Schiff: Evidence of collusion is 'in plain sight'

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffSchiff pleads to Senate GOP: 'Right matters. And the truth matters.' Democrats hammer abuse of power charge, allege Trump put self over country Female impeachment managers say American public know a 'rigged' trial when they see one MORE (D-Calif.) on Monday evening said there is evidence "in plain sight" of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

“There was a big difference between whether there was evidence of collusion — and I think that evidence is in plain sight — and whether you can establish proof beyond a reasonable doubt of a criminal conspiracy,” he told CNN.

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Schiff also questioned whether Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham Barr DOJ says surveillance of Trump campaign adviser Page lacked evidence Senators press DHS over visa approval for Pensacola naval base shooter Democrats sharpen case on second day of arguments MORE would be able to come to an unbiased conclusion about special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSchiff: Trump acquittal in Senate trial would not signal a 'failure' Jeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay MORE's findings.

"You have [an] attorney general who applied for the job by talking down any potential obstruction conviction or indictment who then went to a Senate confirmation and refused to recuse himself," Schiff said. “He has now done the job he applied for, which is attempt to exonerate Mr. Trump. That ought to deeply concern people.”

Mueller on Friday submitted to Barr his highly anticipated report on Russian interference in the 2016 elections and whether there was coordination between the Trump campaign and Moscow.

Barr on Sunday sent a letter to Congress with his summary of the findings. He said in the four-page letter that Mueller did not find evidence of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia. Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinRosenstein says he authorized release of Strzok-Page texts Journalist alleging Obama administration spied on her seeks to reopen case Rosenstein on his time in Trump administration: 'We got all the big issues right' MORE also determined there was not sufficient evidence in Mueller's report to charge President TrumpDonald John TrumpSchiff pleads to Senate GOP: 'Right matters. And the truth matters.' Anita Hill to Iowa crowd: 'Statute of limitations' for Biden apology is 'up' Sen. Van Hollen releases documents from GAO investigation MORE with obstruction of justice.

Democrats, meanwhile, have called for releasing the full report. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (Calif.), the top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, has asked Barr to turn over the full report by April 1.