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Schiff: Evidence of collusion is 'in plain sight'

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffCyber concerns dominate Biden-Putin summit Senate on collision course over Trump DOJ subpoenas Lawmakers urge Biden to be tough on cybersecurity during summit with Putin MORE (D-Calif.) on Monday evening said there is evidence "in plain sight" of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

“There was a big difference between whether there was evidence of collusion — and I think that evidence is in plain sight — and whether you can establish proof beyond a reasonable doubt of a criminal conspiracy,” he told CNN.

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Schiff also questioned whether Attorney General William BarrBill BarrSenate Judiciary Democrats demand DOJ turn over Trump obstruction memo Garland strikes down Trump-era asylum decisions What's happened to Merrick Garland? MORE would be able to come to an unbiased conclusion about special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerSenate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel MORE's findings.

"You have [an] attorney general who applied for the job by talking down any potential obstruction conviction or indictment who then went to a Senate confirmation and refused to recuse himself," Schiff said. “He has now done the job he applied for, which is attempt to exonerate Mr. Trump. That ought to deeply concern people.”

Mueller on Friday submitted to Barr his highly anticipated report on Russian interference in the 2016 elections and whether there was coordination between the Trump campaign and Moscow.

Barr on Sunday sent a letter to Congress with his summary of the findings. He said in the four-page letter that Mueller did not find evidence of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia. Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinHouse Judiciary to probe DOJ's seizure of data from lawmakers, journalists The Hill's Morning Report - Biden-Putin meeting to dominate the week Media leaders to meet with Garland to discuss leak investigations MORE also determined there was not sufficient evidence in Mueller's report to charge President TrumpDonald TrumpNorth Carolina Senate passes trio of election measures 14 Republicans vote against making Juneteenth a federal holiday Border state governors rebel against Biden's immigration chaos MORE with obstruction of justice.

Democrats, meanwhile, have called for releasing the full report. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (Calif.), the top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, has asked Barr to turn over the full report by April 1.