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Schiff: Evidence of collusion is 'in plain sight'

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffHouse Democrats want to silence opposing views, not 'fake news' White House defends not sanctioning Saudi crown prince over Khashoggi What good are the intelligence committees? MORE (D-Calif.) on Monday evening said there is evidence "in plain sight" of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

“There was a big difference between whether there was evidence of collusion — and I think that evidence is in plain sight — and whether you can establish proof beyond a reasonable doubt of a criminal conspiracy,” he told CNN.

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Schiff also questioned whether Attorney General William BarrBill BarrPolitics in the Department of Justice can be a good thing Majority of Republicans say 2020 election was invalid: poll Biden administration withdraws from Connecticut transgender athlete case MORE would be able to come to an unbiased conclusion about special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerWhy a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel CNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump MORE's findings.

"You have [an] attorney general who applied for the job by talking down any potential obstruction conviction or indictment who then went to a Senate confirmation and refused to recuse himself," Schiff said. “He has now done the job he applied for, which is attempt to exonerate Mr. Trump. That ought to deeply concern people.”

Mueller on Friday submitted to Barr his highly anticipated report on Russian interference in the 2016 elections and whether there was coordination between the Trump campaign and Moscow.

Barr on Sunday sent a letter to Congress with his summary of the findings. He said in the four-page letter that Mueller did not find evidence of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia. Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinRosenstein: Zero tolerance immigration policy 'never should have been proposed or implemented' Comey argues Trump shouldn't be prosecuted after leaving Oval Office Trump turns his ire toward Cabinet members MORE also determined there was not sufficient evidence in Mueller's report to charge President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump announces new tranche of endorsements DeSantis, Pence tied in 2024 Republican poll Lawmakers demand changes after National Guard troops at Capitol sickened from tainted food MORE with obstruction of justice.

Democrats, meanwhile, have called for releasing the full report. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (Calif.), the top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, has asked Barr to turn over the full report by April 1.