Clyburn: Question of obstruction of justice is 'still on the table'

House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) said Tuesday that Democratic lawmakers plan to move forward with their investigation of President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump defends Stephanopolous interview Trump defends Stephanopolous interview Buttigieg on offers of foreign intel: 'Just call the FBI' MORE over his firing of former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyFive memorable moments from Sarah Sanders at the White House Five memorable moments from Sarah Sanders at the White House Under Trump, our democracy is for sale MORE in 2017.

In an interview with CNN's "New Day," Clyburn said Democrats on the House Oversight and Reform Committee and the House Judiciary Committee would continue their efforts to investigate whether Trump obstructed justice with Comey's firing. Trump, at the time, said his firing of Comey was related to the former FBI director's investigation into Russia's election interference and possible coordination between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin.

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“The question [of] obstruction of justice is still on the table. And that is something these committees will get into," Clyburn said, adding that he had spoken with Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerWatergate figure John Dean earns laughter for responses to GOP lawmakers The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by MAPRx - Nadler gets breakthrough deal with DOJ on Mueller docs The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by MAPRx - Nadler gets breakthrough deal with DOJ on Mueller docs MORE (D-N.Y.) and Oversight and Reform Committee Chairman Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsHouse Democrats question DHS over using facial recognition tech on US citizens House Democrats question DHS over using facial recognition tech on US citizens Democrats lash out at Trump's bombshell remarks MORE (D-Md.). "They will get into that," he added.

Clyburn said that, as a member of other committees, his immediate focus would remain on fixing problems in the health care system involving the Affordable Care Act, as well as reaching out to Republicans on an infrastructure bill.

"It may be that [those investigations] are chapter five, six [in the story]," Clyburn said. "But let's get to chapter two and three at this point."

Clyburn's comments come days after special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerKamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Kamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump MORE submitted his final conclusions to Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrTrump's Justice Department should change its tune on antitrust policy Schiff blasts DOJ over memo on withholding Trump tax returns Trump remarks deepen distrust with intelligence community MORE on his investigation into Russia's election interference and possible obstruction of justice by the president. Barr, in a four-page summary, said Mueller did not conclude Trump had obstructed justice, but added that the report did not exonerate Trump.

Other Democrats have left open the possibility of continuing investigations against the president even with no intent of finding evidence of criminality.

“We may still have some responsibility to examine the conduct at issue here, even if it doesn’t rise to the level of criminality,” Rep. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineOvernight Defense: Trump doubles down on claim Iran attacked tankers | Iran calls accusations 'alarming' | Top nuke official quietly left Pentagon | Pelosi vows Congress will block Saudi arms sale Overnight Defense: Trump doubles down on claim Iran attacked tankers | Iran calls accusations 'alarming' | Top nuke official quietly left Pentagon | Pelosi vows Congress will block Saudi arms sale Pelosi: Congress will block Trump's arms sales to Saudi Arabia MORE (R.I.) said Monday.