The 8 Republicans who voted against Trump's anti-ObamaCare push

Eight House Republicans on Wednesday joined Democrats to vote in favor of a resolution decrying the Trump administration's push to have the courts invalidate ObamaCare.

The measure passed in a 240-186 vote.

ADVERTISEMENT

The group of eight GOP lawmakers, largely made up of centrist Republicans, opted to support the nonbinding measure led by freshman Rep. Colin Allred (D-Texas) rebuking the Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it backs a district court’s ruling deeming the Affordable Care Act (ACA) unconstitutional.

Here are the Republicans who crossed the aisle to vote against Trump.

Rep. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickFlorida Democrat introduces bill to recognize Puerto Rico statehood referendum DCCC reserves new ad buys in competitive districts, adds new members to 'Red to Blue' program 2020 Global Tiger Day comes with good news, but Congress still has work to do MORE (Pa.)

Rep. John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoThis week: House returns for pre-election sprint Hillicon Valley: Simulated cyberattack success | New bill for election security funding | Amazon could be liable for defective products Lawmakers introduce bill to help election officials address cyber vulnerabilities MORE (N.Y.)

Rep. Tom ReedThomas (Tom) W. ReedCentrist House group offers bipartisan COVID-19 relief deal House approves two child care bills aimed at pandemic Diabetes Caucus co-chairs say telehealth expansion to continue beyond pandemic MORE (N.Y.)

Rep. Denver RigglemanDenver RigglemanVirginians wait up to four hours to cast early voting ballots Five things we learned from this year's primaries The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - First lady casts Trump as fighter for the 'forgotten' MORE (Va.)

Rep. Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithChina sanctioning Rubio, Cruz in retaliatory move over Hong Kong China sanctions Cruz, Rubio, others over Xinjiang legislation New Jersey incumbents steamroll progressive challengers in primaries MORE (N.J.)

Rep. Pete StauberPeter (Pete) Allen StauberTrump, Biden vie for Minnesota Minnesota Rep. Pete Stauber glides to victory in GOP primary OVERNIGHT ENERGY: EPA rule extends life of toxic coal ash ponds | Flint class action suit against Mich. officials can proceed, court rules | Senate Democrats introduce environmental justice bill MORE (Minn.)

Rep. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikRepublicans cast Trump as best choice for women The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Pence rips Biden as radical risk GOP women offer personal testimonials on Trump MORE (N.Y.)

Rep. Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonOn Paycheck Protection Program, streamlined forgiveness is key Hispanic Caucus campaign arm endorses slate of non-Hispanic candidates Progressives soaring after big primary night MORE (Mich.)

Upton, who previously served as chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, explained his vote by citing the lack of an alternative to former President Obama’s landmark health care legislation.

“Pulling the safety net out from under our fellow Americans by repealing Obamacare without a replacement plan ready to go on day one would be cruel and irresponsible," he said in a statement to The Hill.

"There are a lot of problems with Obamacare, for sure," he added. “That is why I have voted for responsible plans to repeal and replace it -- but always with replacement plans that protect those with pre-existing conditions, kids in school, and Medicaid-expansion state recipients."

Reed, a co-chairman of the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus, said he would like to see the administration put forward a replacement plan before the ACA is repealed.

“We must have a plan to reduce costs, ensure access and protect people with pre-existing conditions prior to taking a position on the Constitutionality of the ACA and potentially blowing up our healthcare system," he told The Hill in a statement. "This is only fair for the people we all care about and represent.”

Fitzpatrick said there should be no debate over issues like pre-existing conditions and essential health benefits.

"These are things that everybody needs," he said."The ACA is the law of the land, we ought to improve it where we can."

Other GOP lawmakers did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Updated at 7:09 p.m.