The 8 Republicans who voted against Trump's anti-ObamaCare push

Eight House Republicans on Wednesday joined Democrats to vote in favor of a resolution decrying the Trump administration's push to have the courts invalidate ObamaCare.

The measure passed in a 240-186 vote.

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The group of eight GOP lawmakers, largely made up of centrist Republicans, opted to support the nonbinding measure led by freshman Rep. Colin Allred (D-Texas) rebuking the Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it backs a district court’s ruling deeming the Affordable Care Act (ACA) unconstitutional.

Here are the Republicans who crossed the aisle to vote against Trump.

Rep. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickDemocrats seek to calm nervous left Biden's corporate tax hike is bad for growth — try a carbon tax instead Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting MORE (Pa.)

Rep. John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoSenators introduce bipartisan bill to secure critical groups against hackers House erupts in anger over Jan. 6 and Trump's role McCarthy yanks all GOP picks from Jan. 6 committee MORE (N.Y.)

Rep. Tom ReedTom ReedThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate path uncertain after House approves Jan. 6 panel Lawmakers brace for battles with colleagues as redistricting kicks off Hundreds of businesses sign on to support LGBTQ rights legislation MORE (N.Y.)

Rep. Denver RigglemanDenver RigglemanThe Hill's Morning Report - Pelosi considers adding GOP voices to Jan. 6 panel Democrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probe, eyeing new GOP reinforcements Gosar to hold fundraiser with white nationalist Nick Fuentes MORE (Va.)

Rep. Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithBipartisan congressional commission urges IOC to postpone, relocate Beijing Games The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate path uncertain after House approves Jan. 6 panel The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by Facebook — Biden delivers 100 million shots in 58 days, doses to neighbors MORE (N.J.)

Rep. Pete StauberPeter (Pete) Allen StauberOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Supreme Court rules that pipeline can seize land from New Jersey | Study: EPA underestimated methane emissions from oil and gas development | Kevin McCarthy sets up task forces on climate, other issues Gosar is the Republican that Democrats want to avoid 3 congressmen on Air Force One with Trump took commercial flight after president's diagnosis MORE (Minn.)

Rep. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikGOP's Banks burnishes brand with Pelosi veto Former speed skater launches bid for Stefanik seat House GOP leaders say vaccine works but shouldn't be mandated MORE (N.Y.)

Rep. Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonEquilibrium/ Sustainability — Presented by NextEra Energy — West Coast wildfires drive East Coast air quality alerts OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Western wildfires prompt evacuations in California, Oregon| House passes bill requiring EPA to regulate 'forever chemicals' in drinking water | Granholm announces new building energy codes House passes bill requiring EPA to regulate 'forever chemicals' in drinking water MORE (Mich.)

Upton, who previously served as chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, explained his vote by citing the lack of an alternative to former President Obama’s landmark health care legislation.

“Pulling the safety net out from under our fellow Americans by repealing Obamacare without a replacement plan ready to go on day one would be cruel and irresponsible," he said in a statement to The Hill.

"There are a lot of problems with Obamacare, for sure," he added. “That is why I have voted for responsible plans to repeal and replace it -- but always with replacement plans that protect those with pre-existing conditions, kids in school, and Medicaid-expansion state recipients."

Reed, a co-chairman of the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus, said he would like to see the administration put forward a replacement plan before the ACA is repealed.

“We must have a plan to reduce costs, ensure access and protect people with pre-existing conditions prior to taking a position on the Constitutionality of the ACA and potentially blowing up our healthcare system," he told The Hill in a statement. "This is only fair for the people we all care about and represent.”

Fitzpatrick said there should be no debate over issues like pre-existing conditions and essential health benefits.

"These are things that everybody needs," he said."The ACA is the law of the land, we ought to improve it where we can."

Other GOP lawmakers did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Updated at 7:09 p.m.