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Pelosi declines to say whether Mueller should testify

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiVoters want a strong economy and leadership, Democrats should listen On The Money: Biden to nominate Yellen for Treasury secretary | 'COVID cliff' looms | Democrats face pressure to back smaller stimulus Democrats face increasing pressure to back smaller COVID-19 stimulus MORE (D-Calif.) on Thursday declined to say whether special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE should testify before Congress, as House Democrats clamor to obtain his final report.

“I’m not going into that. I think they should release the report. That’s where the evidence is, the information is. Let’s see the report,” Pelosi told reporters when asked if Mueller appear before lawmakers. “If they don’t have anything to hide, they shouldn’t worry.”

Her comments come a day after the House Judiciary Committee voted to approve a subpoena to compel the Justice Department to provide Congress with Mueller’s report, including accompanying exhibits and its underlying evidence. The resolution also empowers Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerDemocrats accuse GSA of undermining national security by not certifying Biden win Barr sparks DOJ firestorm with election probes memo Marijuana stocks see boost after Harris debate comments MORE (D-N.Y.) to subpoena testimony related to the special counsel's report.

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Attorney General William BarrBill BarrMerrick Garland on list to be Biden's attorney general: report DOJ dropping charges against ex-Mexican defense minister DOJ watchdog finds Louisiana inmates with coronavirus were not isolated for a week MORE has said he will hand over Mueller’s final conclusions to Congress by mid-April or sooner after he redacts any classified information and grand jury materials. Democrats have expressed frustration with his timeline.

“If we cannot reach an accommodation then we will have no choice but to issue subpoenas for these materials,” Nadler said. “And if the department still refuses, then it should be up to a judge — not the president and not his political appointee — to decide whether the committee can review the complete record.”

Mueller finished his 22-month investigation in March. The probe examined possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia in 2016 and obstruction of justice.

Barr has said Mueller did not find any evidence of collusion, but that the special counsel did not make a determination on obstruction, adding that he and Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinTrump turns his ire toward Cabinet members Ex-deputy attorney general says Justice Dept. 'will ignore' Trump's threats against political rivals The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump's erratic tweets upend stimulus talks; COVID-19 spreads in White House MORE determined there was no evidence to support obstruction charges after reviewing Mueller’s report.

Democrats have pounced on Barr and Rosenstein’s determination, saying it should not be up to two Trump appointees to make that call. Reports have also surfaced that members of Mueller’s team are unsatisfied with the four-page summary that Barr sent to Congress, saying the evidence they found regarding obstruction of justice was stronger than he suggested.

“In the public domain there are comments that people on the Mueller team think that there’s a mischaracterization by the attorney general, I don’t know. There’s an easy answer to this: Release the Mueller report as soon as possible,” Pelosi said Thursday.