Pelosi declines to say whether Mueller should testify

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiHouse Democrat pushes for censuring Trump in closed-door meeting Trump: I don't have a racist bone in my body Ocasio-Cortez responds to fresh criticism from Trump MORE (D-Calif.) on Thursday declined to say whether special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTop Republican considered Mueller subpoena to box in Democrats Kamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump MORE should testify before Congress, as House Democrats clamor to obtain his final report.

“I’m not going into that. I think they should release the report. That’s where the evidence is, the information is. Let’s see the report,” Pelosi told reporters when asked if Mueller appear before lawmakers. “If they don’t have anything to hide, they shouldn’t worry.”

Her comments come a day after the House Judiciary Committee voted to approve a subpoena to compel the Justice Department to provide Congress with Mueller’s report, including accompanying exhibits and its underlying evidence. The resolution also empowers Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerTrump knocks Mueller after deal struck for him to testify House Democrats request briefing on Epstein, Acosta Nadler apologized after repeatedly calling Hope Hicks 'Ms. Lewandowski' at hearing MORE (D-N.Y.) to subpoena testimony related to the special counsel's report.

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Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - House to vote to condemn Trump tweet House poised to hold Barr, Ross in contempt Harris campaign accepts money from partners of law firm she criticized over Epstein case MORE has said he will hand over Mueller’s final conclusions to Congress by mid-April or sooner after he redacts any classified information and grand jury materials. Democrats have expressed frustration with his timeline.

“If we cannot reach an accommodation then we will have no choice but to issue subpoenas for these materials,” Nadler said. “And if the department still refuses, then it should be up to a judge — not the president and not his political appointee — to decide whether the committee can review the complete record.”

Mueller finished his 22-month investigation in March. The probe examined possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia in 2016 and obstruction of justice.

Barr has said Mueller did not find any evidence of collusion, but that the special counsel did not make a determination on obstruction, adding that he and Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinFeds will not charge officer who killed Eric Garner The Hill's Morning Report — Trump retreats on census citizenship question Judiciary issues blitz of subpoenas for Kushner, Sessions, Trump associates MORE determined there was no evidence to support obstruction charges after reviewing Mueller’s report.

Democrats have pounced on Barr and Rosenstein’s determination, saying it should not be up to two Trump appointees to make that call. Reports have also surfaced that members of Mueller’s team are unsatisfied with the four-page summary that Barr sent to Congress, saying the evidence they found regarding obstruction of justice was stronger than he suggested.

“In the public domain there are comments that people on the Mueller team think that there’s a mischaracterization by the attorney general, I don’t know. There’s an easy answer to this: Release the Mueller report as soon as possible,” Pelosi said Thursday.