Speaker in waiting? Rapid rise of Hakeem Jeffries fuels talk

Rep. Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesCalls for police reform sparks divisions in Congress Democrats call for Congress to take action following death of George Floyd Harris, Jeffries question why Manafort, Cohen released while others remain in prison MORE (D-N.Y.) is a study in contrasts.

The unflappable head of the House Democratic Caucus has emerged as a fiercely disciplined party spin doctor, proficient in promoting the Democrats’ ambitious agenda and attacking President TrumpDonald John TrumpFormer employees critique EPA under Trump in new report Fired State Department watchdog says Pompeo aide attempted to 'bully' him over investigations Virginia senator calls for Barr to resign over order to clear protests MORE in cataclysmic terms, often in the same breath.

To get him off message would amount to a coup.

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Yet the four-term lawmaker has climbed quickly through the ranks in part by taking strategic political risks that bucked the party establishment even as he was rising through it. Jeffries challenged an incumbent in his first run for Congress; endorsed a long-shot presidential candidate over his home-state senator in the 2008 primary and defeated a popular veteran Democrat to win the caucus chairmanship last year.

His rapid ascension has sparked talk that Jeffries, 48, is in line to succeed Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi scoffs at comparison between Trump and Churchill: 'I think they're hallucinating' Republicans stand by Esper after public break with Trump Pelosi joins protests against George Floyd's death outside Capitol MORE (D-Calif.) whenever she chooses to bow out. If he reaches that pinnacle, Jeffries would make history as the nation’s first African-American Speaker.

“Hakeem’s ceiling is unlimited,” said Rep. Ted LieuTed W. LieuTed Lieu responds to viral video: 'Costco has a right to require that customers wear a mask' Bipartisan Senate group offers new help to state, local governments California Democrat blasts Huntington Beach protesters: They 'undoubtedly spread the virus' MORE (D-Calif.), who serves with Jeffries in leadership. “He has terrific interpersonal skills; he is good in the media … [and] he doesn’t tend to make mistakes.”

Jeffries is mum about his future plans, saying he’s looking no further than his task as party chairman heading into the crucial 2020 elections.

“Haven’t given that any thought, because the only responsible thing to do is to focus on the job that you’re privileged to have,” he said during an hourlong interview in his office in the Longworth House Office Building on Capitol Hill.

An unruly caucus

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Jeffries is helping to lead a caucus shaped by an insurgent liberal base determined to protest Trump, as well as centrist freshmen who flipped GOP seats in red-leaning districts.

 In the new Congress, those factions have clashed over issues as diverse as climate change, health care policy and anti-Semitism, laying bare the party divisions and creating headaches for leadership. Jeffries said he saw those battles coming.

 “One of the reasons why I ran for this position is because I knew that in order for House Democrats to be successful in the majority, we had to message with discipline, legislate with precision and proceed with operational unity,” he said.

 The push for unity has emerged as another minefield for Democrats this year, after the party’s campaign arm, led by Rep. Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosGOP pulls support from California House candidate over 'unacceptable' social media posts Republican flips House seat in California special election GOP's Don Bacon and challenger neck and neck in Democratic poll MORE (D-Ill.), codified new rules barring official party vendors from working on behalf of primary candidates challenging sitting incumbents. It’s a move that has infuriated a number of liberal lawmakers, including Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOcasio-Cortez endorses Engel primary challenger Forget politics — America needs a realistic debate about our energy future Ocasio-Cortez to Washington Redskins on 'Blackout Tuesday' post: 'Change your name' MORE (D-N.Y.), whose shocking primary victory over Joseph Crowley last year opened up the caucus chairmanship that Jeffries now occupies.

Ocasio-Cortez’s victory angered a number of Crowley allies, but Jeffries said she’s been “welcomed with open arms.”

“Once you arrive, you are a member of Congress, and you are a part of the team,” he said.

No sure bet

Jeffries’s path to the No. 5 leadership job was not without some controversy, and some say he’s no shoo-in to take the party reins.

While Pelosi has imposed a cap on her own leadership reign, her two lieutenants, Reps. Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerCalls for police reform sparks divisions in Congress Hoyer wins Maryland House primary Hoyer: Gassing of protestors 'worthy' of Trump censure MORE (D-Md.) and James Clyburn (D-S.C.), have declined to follow suit.

Jeffries, a former corporate lawyer, ruffled plenty of feathers in the left-leaning caucus in defeating Rep. Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeMinority caucuses call for quick action on police reform Democrats call for Congress to take action following death of George Floyd Black Caucus member unveils bill to create commission addressing legacy of slavery MORE (D-Calif.), a liberal institution and feminist trailblazer, for the party chairmanship in 2018 — a razor-close contest that led to charges from Lee and some of her closest allies that ageism and sexism were at play.

“I think there are lots of future Speakers of the House,” said Rep. Jackie SpeierKaren (Jackie) Lorraine Jacqueline SpeierAir Force documents acknowledged 'persistent' racial bias in justice system HHS watchdog says actions should be free from political interference Five factors influencing when the House returns MORE (D-Calif.), who was seen consoling Lee, a fellow Bay Area Democrat, after her defeat by Jeffries last fall. “Hakeem certainly has talent, and a lot of others have talent.”

Both sides say they’ve moved on, but there are whispers of lingering resentment. Speier said Jeffries never reached out to her after the contentious race, and she lamented the “duplicitous” members who vowed support to Lee they didn’t give. The idea that gender and generation bias governed the race clearly crawled under Jeffries’s skin, as well.

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“There’s no reason to believe that fellow members of the House Democratic Caucus would make decisions anchored in sexism or ageism,” he said.

Taking risks

Political success did not come immediately for Jeffries.

 He lost his first two races for the statehouse. A third run, though, took him to Albany, and as a freshman assemblyman in 2007 he did the unthinkable, endorsing a backbenching senator, Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaTrump calls Mattis 'overrated' after ex-Defense secretary issues scathing rebuke Obama calls for police reforms, doesn't address Trump Watch live: Obama addresses George Floyd's death and police reform MORE, at a time when most Democrats, especially those in New York, were rallying behind Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden opens widest lead over Trump in online betting markets Trump, Biden battle to shape opinion on scenes of unrest Sessions accepts 'Fox News Sunday' invitation to debate, Tuberville declines MORE.

 Jeffries challenged incumbent Rep. Edolphus Towns (D-N.Y.) in a primary in 2012 to represent parts of Brooklyn and Queens. (Towns subsequently announced his retirement, precluding that face-off.)

 These days, however, Jeffries has adopted the role of team player, backing the new rules to protect incumbents.

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Political awakening 

It was rare to hear politics discussed around the dinner table when Jeffries was growing up in Brooklyn’s Crown Heights neighborhood. But the 1010 WINS news radio station was on every morning when he sat down for breakfast.

And evidence of social and racial inequality were all around him. Jeffries’s mother was a caseworker for the city; his father was a substance abuse counselor for the state. Crown Heights in the 1970s and ’80s was plagued by poverty, a drug epidemic and gun violence.

But Jeffries’s political awakening didn’t occur until many years later, in April 1992, when he was a student at Binghamton University. Jeffries returned home one night, flipped on the TV and saw Los Angeles in flames — riots sparked by the acquittal of white police officers who had been caught on video severely beating a black motorist, Rodney King.

“That moment, with the acquittal of those four officers in the face of clear videotape evidence, crystallized for me once again that there were social, racial and economic injustices that remain stubbornly part of our system,” Jeffries said. “And I hope one day to be a part of addressing those things.”

Jeffries is already having an impact. He scored an enormous legislative victory last year when a sweeping criminal justice reform proposal he’d championed was signed into law — a rare bipartisan triumph that hinged on the buy-in of an unusually diverse group of proponents, including Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump poses for controversial photo op at DC church amid protests Tucker Carlson tees off on Trump, Kushner: 'People will not forgive weakness' Trump's strategy to stay in office MORE, Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser.

Jeffries characterized Kushner as “a straight shooter” on the topic and voiced some optimism that similar cooperation is possible this Congress on other big-ticket issues, like drug pricing and infrastructure.

“Those areas are not nearly as controversial as criminal justice reform,” he said. “And the elements to come together certainly exist.”