Dem lawmakers form Black Maternal Health Caucus

Reps. Lauren UnderwoodLauren UnderwoodHouse Dems introduce bill to fight social media disinformation House passes bill to revamp medical screenings for migrants at border The Hill's 12:30 Report: All eyes on Pelosi as calls for impeachment grow MORE (D-Ill.) and Alma AdamsAlma Shealey AdamsTo boost minority serving institutions, bipartisan Future Act needs immediate action Ensuring AI benefits everyone, tech must have a diverse pipeline Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment MORE (D-N.C.) announced Tuesday morning that they have created a Black Maternal Health Caucus. 

At least 57 members of Congress had joined the caucus Tuesday afternoon, including House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerHillicon Valley: Google, Reddit to testify on tech industry protections | Trump joins Amazon-owned Twitch | House to vote on bill to combat foreign interference Overnight Health Care — Presented by Coalition Against Surprise Medical Billing — Judge blocks Trump 'public charge' rule | Appeals court skeptical of Trump arguments for Medicaid work requirements | CDC offers guidance for treating vaping-related cases House to vote this month on legislation to combat foreign interference in elections MORE (D-Md.) and Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.), according to Underwood's office.

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Underwood said the high maternal death rate among black women in the U.S. prompted her to co-found the caucus. 

"Our caucus will elevate black maternal health as a national priority and explore and advocate for effective, evidence-based, culturally competent policies and best practices for improving black maternal health," Underwood said at a press conference.

Adams tweeted that she was "thrilled" to help introduce the caucus.  

“The facts are simple. Black women are dying of preventable, pregnancy-related complications at an alarming rate, and as Black mother and grandmother, it’s personal to me," Adams said in a statement. "Maternal mortality disproportionately impacts Black women, and I started this caucus, so my colleagues and I can work together to find culturally-competent solutions specific to the Black community."

Clyburn also cheered the caucus's creation on Twitter:

The Hill has reached out to Underwood and Adams for additional comment. 

The U.S. has a higher rate of maternal deaths than any other developed country, with 26.4 deaths per 100,000 births. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 60 percent of these fatalities can be prevented. Black women are four times as likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than white women. 

—Updated at 4:56 p.m.