Republicans call for ex-Trump lawyer Cohen to be referred to DOJ

House Republicans are demanding that a transcript of former Trump personal attorney Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenMichael Cohen to sell prison badge as NFT Sunday shows - Spotlight shifts to omicron variant Cohen says Weisselberg not 'key' to Trump case MORE's testimony before lawmakers be sent to the Department of Justice (DOJ) for a potential perjury investigation.

Rep. Mark GreenMark GreenNearshoring: Panacea, quick fix or something in between? Cities become pawns in redistricting game GOP senators seek to block dishonorable discharges for unvaccinated troops MORE (R-Tenn.) introduced the privileged resolution on Wednesday. It directs Oversight and Reform Committee Chairman Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsFormer GOP congressional candidate Kimberly Klacik suing Candace Owens for defamation Former Cummings staffer unveils congressional bid McCarthy, GOP face a delicate dance on Jan. 6 committee MORE (D-Md.) to send a copy of the Cohen transcript to the DOJ for review.

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Supporters of the measure argue Cummings failed to live up to his promise to hold Cohen accountable after they accused him of lying under oath, arguing the former lawyer to President TrumpDonald TrumpMan sentenced to nearly four years for running scam Trump, Biden PACs Meadows says Trump's blood oxygen level was dangerously low when he had COVID-19 Trump endorses David Perdue in Georgia's governor race MORE misled the panel at least seven times while testifying in February.

“We're making a simple request today that Democrats protect the integrity of the House of Representatives and refer Michael Cohen to the Department of Justice for perjury. Why is this controversial?” Green, who was joined by a group of House Oversight Republicans, told reporters at a press conference.

“Michael Cohen swore under oath to tell the truth before the House Oversight Committee, but he lied and multiple times. Ranking Member [Jim] Jordan [R-Ohio] and the rest of us warned the Democrats that we couldn't trust a man who was going to jail for lying to Congress — that's just common sense," he said.

Jordan, the top Republican on the Oversight panel, told reporters he doesn’t believe there is any disagreement between parties over whether Cohen lied to Congress, adding, “I just think they're not willing to do what they said they were going to do.”

Cohen, who was the first witness called before the committee after Democrats took control of the panel this year, repeatedly told lawmakers that he “never” asked for a pardon before backtracking on his remarks.

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyPressure grows to remove Boebert from committees Senate leaders face pushback on tying debt fight to defense bill News reporting in an age of rampant mendacity MORE (R-Calif.) blasted Democrats on the committee for failing to act swiftly to refer Cohen to the DOJ, adding they should have been wary of bringing a witness in who was slated to go to prison for lying under oath.

“If you [Cummings] were not willing to stand up to someone who lied before your committee, you should not have told the American public that,” he said.

Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanWith extreme gerrymanders locking in, Biden needs to make democracy preservation job one Jim Jordan reveals he had COVID-19 this summer The Memo: Gosar censured, but toxic culture grows MORE has been patient, Jim Jordan has worked with this chairman. Forty-two days is patient enough,” McCarthy said.

Rep. Mark MeadowsMark MeadowsMeadows says Trump's blood oxygen level was dangerously low when he had COVID-19 Trump came in contact with 500 people between first positive test and hospitalization: report Kevin McCarthy is hostage to the GOP's 'exotic wing' MORE (R-N.C.), the chairman of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, said it’s critical to get members on the record on the issue. He argued lawmakers need to hold witnesses accountable to uphold the integrity of the panel.

"Hopefully, we will see the Democrats have come together in a bipartisan way to say that we will not allow a witness to come in here and lie and lie and admit, even by his own attorney's admission, that perhaps the testimony he gave was not exactly the truth,” he said.

“And and so we have this particular resolution that in two weeks will be having a vote on. And it will be up to Speaker [Nancy] Pelosi [D-Calif.] to decide on whether that's going to be a bipartisan vote, standing up for this institution, or whether it will be exercised in a privileged manner to make sure that everyone goes on record,” Meadows said.

Cohen is scheduled to report to prison on May 6 after pleading guilty last year to a series of crimes while working for Trump. He was sentenced in December to 36 months in jail and used his congressional testimony earlier this year to further implicate Trump in a hush money scheme before the 2016 election.