House Judiciary chair to call on McGahn to testify before Congress

House Judiciary Committee chair Jerry NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerBiden to raise refugee cap to 125,000 in October Ocasio-Cortez, Bush push to add expanded unemployment in .5T spending plan Angelina Jolie spotted in Capitol meeting with senators MORE (D-N.Y.) said Sunday that Democrats would call former White House counsel Don McGahn to testify about his testimony for special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerSenate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel MORE's investigation. 

Nadler made the announcement on NBC's "Meet The Press" while saying that Congress needed to hear from people such as Mueller and Attorney General William BarrBill BarrBarr-Durham investigation again fails to produce a main event Virginia governor's race enters new phase as early voting begins Clinton lawyer's indictment reveals 'bag of tricks' MORE

"We have to hear from other people like Don McGahn, who we’re going to call," Nadler added. 

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The Democratic lawmaker, a frequent critic of President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump takes shot at new GOP candidate in Ohio over Cleveland nickname GOP political operatives indicted over illegal campaign contribution from Russian national in 2016 On The Money — Dems dare GOP to vote for shutdown, default MORE's, argued on Sunday that Barr had "clearly misled the American people" on Mueller's investigation into obstruction of justice. 

Among other things, Nadler said that Trump's possible obstruction, "if proven, would be impeachable."

The comments come just days after the Justice Department released a redacted version of Mueller's report into Russian interference and Trump. The report stated that the special counsel was unable to “conclusively determine” that no criminal conduct occurred in regards to obstruction of justice.

It also included several instances of possible obstruction of justice, including Trump's alleged request of McGahn to fire Mueller. McGahn refused to follow through on the request, according to Mueller's report, saying "that he would resign rather than trigger what he regarded as a potential Saturday Night Massacre."

Trump's attorney, Rudy Giuliani, said Sunday that Trump would not have committed obstruction of justice if he fired Mueller because "there were very good reasons to fire" him. 

“Mueller hired a staff in which he had people that I would find very, very questionable as people that should be investigating Donald Trump," Giuliani said.