House Judiciary chair to call on McGahn to testify before Congress

House Judiciary Committee chair Jerry NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerDem committee chairs blast Trump G-7 announcement Top Democrat holds moment of silence for Cummings at hearing Barr to speak at Notre Dame law school on Friday MORE (D-N.Y.) said Sunday that Democrats would call former White House counsel Don McGahn to testify about his testimony for special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerFox News legal analyst says Trump call with Ukraine leader could be 'more serious' than what Mueller 'dragged up' Lewandowski says Mueller report was 'very clear' in proving 'there was no obstruction,' despite having 'never' read it Fox's Cavuto roasts Trump over criticism of network MORE's investigation. 

Nadler made the announcement on NBC's "Meet The Press" while saying that Congress needed to hear from people such as Mueller and Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrMulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe Mulvaney ties withheld Ukraine aid to political probe sought by Trump Matthew Shepard's parents blast Barr's LGBTQ record in anniversary of hate crime law MORE

"We have to hear from other people like Don McGahn, who we’re going to call," Nadler added. 

The Democratic lawmaker, a frequent critic of President TrumpDonald John TrumpFlorida GOP lawmaker says he's 'thinking' about impeachment Democrats introduce 'THUG Act' to block funding for G-7 at Trump resort Kurdish group PKK pens open letter rebuking Trump's comparison to ISIS MORE's, argued on Sunday that Barr had "clearly misled the American people" on Mueller's investigation into obstruction of justice. 

Among other things, Nadler said that Trump's possible obstruction, "if proven, would be impeachable."

The comments come just days after the Justice Department released a redacted version of Mueller's report into Russian interference and Trump. The report stated that the special counsel was unable to “conclusively determine” that no criminal conduct occurred in regards to obstruction of justice.

It also included several instances of possible obstruction of justice, including Trump's alleged request of McGahn to fire Mueller. McGahn refused to follow through on the request, according to Mueller's report, saying "that he would resign rather than trigger what he regarded as a potential Saturday Night Massacre."

Trump's attorney, Rudy Giuliani, said Sunday that Trump would not have committed obstruction of justice if he fired Mueller because "there were very good reasons to fire" him. 

“Mueller hired a staff in which he had people that I would find very, very questionable as people that should be investigating Donald Trump," Giuliani said.