House Judiciary chair to call on McGahn to testify before Congress

House Judiciary Committee chair Jerry NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerTrump defense team signals focus on Schiff Impeachment has been a dud for Democrats Nadler calls Trump a 'dictator' on Senate floor MORE (D-N.Y.) said Sunday that Democrats would call former White House counsel Don McGahn to testify about his testimony for special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSchiff: Trump acquittal in Senate trial would not signal a 'failure' Jeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay MORE's investigation. 

Nadler made the announcement on NBC's "Meet The Press" while saying that Congress needed to hear from people such as Mueller and Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham Barr DOJ says surveillance of Trump campaign adviser Page lacked evidence Senators press DHS over visa approval for Pensacola naval base shooter Democrats sharpen case on second day of arguments MORE

"We have to hear from other people like Don McGahn, who we’re going to call," Nadler added. 

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The Democratic lawmaker, a frequent critic of President TrumpDonald John TrumpKaine: Obama called Trump a 'fascist' during 2016 campaign Kaine: GOP senators should 'at least' treat Trump trial with seriousness of traffic court Louise Linton, wife of Mnuchin, deletes Instagram post in support of Greta Thunberg MORE's, argued on Sunday that Barr had "clearly misled the American people" on Mueller's investigation into obstruction of justice. 

Among other things, Nadler said that Trump's possible obstruction, "if proven, would be impeachable."

The comments come just days after the Justice Department released a redacted version of Mueller's report into Russian interference and Trump. The report stated that the special counsel was unable to “conclusively determine” that no criminal conduct occurred in regards to obstruction of justice.

It also included several instances of possible obstruction of justice, including Trump's alleged request of McGahn to fire Mueller. McGahn refused to follow through on the request, according to Mueller's report, saying "that he would resign rather than trigger what he regarded as a potential Saturday Night Massacre."

Trump's attorney, Rudy Giuliani, said Sunday that Trump would not have committed obstruction of justice if he fired Mueller because "there were very good reasons to fire" him. 

“Mueller hired a staff in which he had people that I would find very, very questionable as people that should be investigating Donald Trump," Giuliani said.