Dems see GOP effort to drive them to impeach Trump

House Democratic leaders facing liberal calls for impeaching President TrumpDonald John TrumpSarah Huckabee Sanders becomes Fox News contributor The US-Iranian scuffle over a ship is a sideshow to events in the Gulf South Korea: US, North Korea to resume nuclear talks 'soon' MORE are confronting increasing pressure from an unlikely faction: Republicans who appear eager to goad them into it.  

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiCutting tariffs is better than cutting payroll taxes to boost the economy Pelosi speaks with Israeli president after Trump controversy In debate over internet speech law, pay attention to whose voices are ignored MORE (D-Calif.) and her leadership team have repeatedly sought to defuse the appeals for impeachment hearings, deeming them premature, and some Democrats sense the Republicans are setting a political trap to boost their ally in the White House.

But recent stonewalling actions by the administration have only fueled the liberal push to oust the president, complicating leadership efforts to keep a lid on the campaign.

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GOP leaders know impeachment divides Democrats and see a clear political advantage in promoting the debate. The Republicans’ campaign arm is steadily blasting emails linking moderate Democrats in swing districts to the impeachment effort. And a growing number of GOP lawmakers are all but daring Democratic leaders to launch the process while it remains unpopular with voters — a strategy not overlooked by top Democrats vowing to resist the bait.

“They would love to drive this to an impeachment because they think it will be their political salvation,” Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinHouse panel investigating decision to resume federal executions Pelosi, allies seek to keep gun debate focused on McConnell Pelosi backers feel vindicated after tumultuous stretch MORE (D-Md.), a Judiciary Committee member, said of Republicans.

“If we get there, we will get there on our own time and our own way. We're not going to be baited into it,” Raskin said.

Those dynamics appeared front and center last week during the partisan fight over Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrBarr says he has seen 'nothing' to undercut Epstein autopsy findings Prosecutors are mainly to blame for the criminal justice crisis The Hill's Morning Report - Trump hews to NRA on guns and eyes lower taxes MORE’s scheduled testimony before the House Judiciary Committee. Behind Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerSecond Democrat representing Trump district backs impeachment GOP memo deflects some gun questions to 'violence from the left' House Democrats urge Trump to end deportations of Iraqis after diabetic man's death MORE (D-N.Y.), Democrats had demanded that Barr submit to interviews by staff attorneys from both parties. Barr declined, refusing to appear at all, and Republicans quickly accused Democrats of trying to employ the legal powers provided by impeachment before they’ve formally launched the process.

Rep. Doug CollinsDouglas (Doug) Allen CollinsThe United States broken patent system is getting worse Democratic Women's Caucus calls for investigation into Epstein plea deal Activist groups push House Judiciary leaders to end mass phone data collection MORE (Ga.), the top Republican on the Judiciary panel, seemed to challenge Nadler to take that step, saying in a Fox News interview that Democrats “don't have the fortitude to actually bring an impeachment inquiry.”

“The procedural and legal perks of impeachment do not apply, and the chairman can’t have it both ways. He can’t try to pacify his liberal base by pretending to do impeachment without actually taking the plunge,” Collins wrote in prepared remarks for Thursday’s hearing. “The reality of our chamber and this distinguished committee is that when it comes to impeachment, you’re either in, Mr. Chairman, or you’re out, and, right now, you’re out.”

Collins was hardly the only Republican to invoke impeachment while attacking House Democrats’ treatment of Barr.

“Chairman Nadler decided to change the rules to satisfy the very obvious desire to impeach President Trump,” House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyOmar says US should reconsider aid to Israel I'm not a Nazi, I'm just a dude: What it's like to be the other Steve King Trump finds consistent foil in 'Squad' MORE (R-Calif.) told reporters at a press conference on Thursday. “Nadler has been wanting to impeach the day after the election. He can't have the facts to prove why he should, but he will not stop.”

“I view this as nothing more than a trial run for impeachment,” echoed Rep. Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.).

Democrats face a balancing act as they seek to unite their diverse caucus in response to the release of special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerMueller report fades from political conversation Trump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony MORE’s report on Russia's interference in the 2016 elections.

Pelosi, joined by an overwhelming majority of Democrats, favors an aggressive investigative approach that seeks to gather more evidence of potential administrative wrongdoing — and swing more voters against the president — before they consider impeaching him.

A recent Quinnipiac University Poll hints at the logic in that design, finding that 66 percent of voters currently oppose impeachment, versus just 29 percent who support it.

“Obviously, impeachment is the ultimate [option],” said House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerOmar says US should reconsider aid to Israel Liberal Democrat eyes aid cuts to Israel after Omar, Tlaib denied entry Lawmakers blast Trump as Israel bars door to Tlaib and Omar MORE (D-Md.). “But we need to pursue this in a very, very vigorous way. Because this goes to the very essence of the relationship between two co-equal branches of government.”

Yet the Democrats' tough talk has done little to prompt new cooperation from the administration. Trump has vowed to fight “all the subpoenas.” And Barr’s refusal to testify last week — combined with the recent airing of Mueller’s evident grievances with Barr's assessment of the investigators' findings — have left Democrats inching ever closer to impeachment proceedings.  

“If the Trump administration wants impeachment, they're doing a good job of pushing the Democrats there,” Rep. Ted LieuTed W. LieuLawmakers urge DNC to name Asian American debate moderator Cities are the future: We need to coordinate their international diplomacy George Conway opposes #unfollowTrump movement MORE (D-Calif.), a Judiciary Committee member, told CNN on Thursday. “We want to first gather facts to decide if we should impeach. If we can't gather facts, then we're going to launch an Article III impeachment.”

Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenDanish prime minister: Trump's idea to buy Greenland 'absurd'  Juan Williams: Democrats finally hit Trump where it hurts We need a climate plan for agriculture MORE (D-Texas) is threatening again to force another House floor vote on impeachment. And Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibIsrael should resist Trump's efforts to politicize support Jewish Democrats decry Trump's 'loyalty' remarks Poll: Voters split on whether it's acceptable for Israel to deny Omar, Tlaib visas MORE (D-Mich.), a progressive freshman who has proposed legislation requiring the Judiciary Committee to begin examining potentially impeachable offenses, said interest in her resolution has spiked in the last week.

“For me, the Mueller letter to Barr, that is confirmation that Attorney General Barr works for Trump, not the country,” she said. “This is more and more looking like a cover-up, right?”

Putting even more pressure on Democratic leaders, some presidential primary contenders are advocating for impeachment, particularly if the administration continues to refuse requests for information from the investigative committees. Joe BidenJoe BidenSarah Huckabee Sanders becomes Fox News contributor Poll shows Biden, Warren tied with Trump in Arizona Giuliani says he discussed Biden with Ukrainian official MORE, the former vice president and now front-runner in the primary race, joined that chorus last week.

Few Democrats on Capitol Hill are sounding that alarm, however, weighing lesser legal options to gather documents and compel witness testimony, including Nadler’s recent threat to hold Barr in contempt of Congress.

“There's a process that's involved here,” Pelosi said Thursday. “The committee will act upon how we will proceed.”

Even Democrats who already support impeachment say the investigations effectively serve a similar purpose.

“In terms of the immediate next steps, I think functionally all the same things I would want to see in an impeachment inquiry are already under way,” said Rep. Jared HuffmanJared William HuffmanDemocrats see window closing for impeachment Appetite for Democratic term limits fizzling out The Hill's Morning Report — Mueller testimony gives Trump a boost as Dems ponder next steps MORE (D-Calif.). “Speaker Pelosi is making it clear that she's not pulling any punches on President Trump. She's not giving him any passes. We're going to hold him accountable.”

Whatever route the Democrats choose, they’re insistent that the Republicans’ pressure campaign will play no role whatsoever.

“If they want to impeach the president, they should go ahead and introduce the articles,” Raskin said. “As for us, we'll take our actions on our own schedule and on our own volition.”