Trump tweets — and Dems pull two bills from floor

House Democrats pulled two bills from the floor schedule on Wednesday after President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump pushes back on recent polling data, says internal numbers are 'strongest we've had so far' Illinois state lawmaker apologizes for photos depicting mock assassination of Trump Scaramucci assembling team of former Cabinet members to speak out against Trump MORE tweeted his opposition and encouraged Republicans to vote against one of the measures.

Trump’s tweets heightened the possibility that the measures would be defeated on the floor, particularly since they were being considered under the suspension of House rules — and would have required two-thirds majorities for passage.

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Trump urged Republicans to vote against a measure that would end a legal challenge to the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe’s reservation in Massachusetts. Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenTop Sanders adviser: Warren isn't competing for 'same pool of voters' Eight Democratic presidential hopefuls to appear in CNN climate town hall In shift, top CEOs say shareholder value not top goal MORE (D-Mass.), a presidential candidate who Trump has repeatedly feuded with, backs the bill and Trump used her support to press his party to oppose it.

“Republicans shouldn’t vote for H.R. 312, a special interest casino Bill, backed by Elizabeth (Pocahontas) Warren,” Trump tweeted, using his derisive nickname for Warren. “It is unfair and doesn’t treat Native Americans equally!”

The measure would end a legal challenge to the tribe’s reservation that has been brought by opponents of its proposed casino. The proposed casino would be built by the Malaysian gaming conglomerate Genting.

The Department of the Interior reversed plans to reserve 321 acres for the tribe after a lawsuit was filed, according to The Cape Cod Times.

The measure backed by Warren also has GOP support in the House, but had drawn opposition from conservatives even before Trump’s tweet.

Critics of the bill have taken issue with Genting’s involvement in the casino.

“They have fronted the Mashpee tribe over $500 million, and it's all about this casino in Taunton,” Rep. Paul GosarPaul Anthony GosarConservatives call on Pelosi to cancel August recess The 27 Republicans who voted with Democrats to block Trump from taking military action against Iran Conservatives ask Barr to lay out Trump's rationale for census question MORE (R-Ariz.) said in an interview.

The second bill pulled from the schedule was backed by Rep. Tom ColeThomas (Tom) Jeffrey ColeTo fix retirement, we need to understand it On The Money: Trump banks on Fed, China to fuel 2020 economy | Judge orders parties to try to reach deal in lawsuit over Trump tax returns | Warren targets corporate power with plan to overhaul trade policy Lawmakers point to entitlements when asked about deficits MORE (R-Okla.) and would have affirmed the federal government’s right to place land into a trust for a tribe’s benefit.

Democrats criticized Trump’s tweet and said they would consider the bill opposed by Trump and backed by Warren in a simple House vote next week that would not require a two-thirds majority.

They said they would still consider the Cole bill under suspension next week.

“The president he sent out a tweet, which was silly — I'm trying to use the kind of words I can use — it was the wrong thing to do,” House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerLiberal Democrat eyes aid cuts to Israel after Omar, Tlaib denied entry Lawmakers blast Trump as Israel bars door to Tlaib and Omar Israel denies Omar and Tlaib entry after Trump tweet MORE (D-Md.) told reporters.

Rep. Ruben GallegoRuben GallegoCongressional Hispanic Caucus calls for answers on Mississippi ICE raids Congressional Hispanic Caucus members call for diversity within the Fed Overnight Energy: Warren edges past Sanders in poll of climate-focused voters | Carbon tax shows new signs of life | Greens fuming at Trump plans for development at Bears Ears monument MORE (D-Ariz.) criticized Trump’s tweet given lobbying on the bill by Matthew Schlapp, who is married to White House director of strategic communications Mercedes Schlapp.

“With this tweet, President Trump is not only allowing special interest lobbyists like Matt Schlapp – who happens to be married to his staffer – to direct federal policy, but reinforcing the federal government’s ugly history of oppression towards Indian tribes,” Gallego said.

Matthew Schlapp, a lobbyist for Cove Strategies, is one of four lobbyists representing Twin River Management Group, which owns two casinos in Rhode Island.

Twin River has Cove Strategies on a $30,000 retainer and also retains Black Diamond Strategies and Locke Lord Public Policy Group, both at $30,000. Hans Klingler with Black Diamond Strategies, former chief of staff to former Sen. Connie Mack (R-Fla.), is another familiar lobbyist on retainer.

Alex Gangitano contributed.