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Nadler: 'We are now in a constitutional crisis'

Nadler: 'We are now in a constitutional crisis'
© Greg Nash

After voting to hold Attorney General William BarrBill BarrPolice accountability board concludes that Seattle police officers used excessive force during encounters with protesters Trump hasn't asked Barr to open investigation into Bidens, McEnany says Seattle, Portland, NYC sue Trump administration over threat to pull federal money MORE in contempt of Congress Wednesday, House Judiciary Chair Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerMarijuana stocks see boost after Harris debate comments Jewish lawmakers targeted by anti-Semitic tweets ahead of election: ADL Democrats shoot down talk of expanding Supreme Court MORE (D-N.Y.) declared that the nation is in a "constitutional crisis" as the Trump administration digs in against Democrats' attempts at congressional oversight.

"We’ve talked for a long time about approaching a Constitutional crisis. We are now in it,” Nadler said in an afternoon press conference. 

"Now is the time of testing whether we can keep a republic, or whether this republic is destined to change into a different, more tyrannical form of government," he added "We must resist this."

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Nadler's Judiciary panel voted to hold Barr in contempt for failing to produce an un-redacted version of special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's report and its underlying evidence. The vote came the same day that President TrumpDonald John TrumpGiuliani goes off on Fox Business host after she compares him to Christopher Steele Trump looks to shore up support in Nebraska NYT: Trump had 7 million in debt mostly tied to Chicago project forgiven MORE moved to exert executive privilege over the report, which was released in redacted form last month.

Nadler's statements echo similar comments he made Wednesday morning before the House panel voted.

"The phrase constitutional crisis has been overused, but certainly," he said Wednesday morning, according to CNN. "Certainly, it's a constitutional crisis, although I don't like to use that phrase because it's been used for far less dangerous situations."

"We are in one because the president is disobeying the law, is refusing all information to Congress," he added.