Nadler: 'We are now in a constitutional crisis'

Nadler: 'We are now in a constitutional crisis'
© Greg Nash

After voting to hold Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrProsecutors are mainly to blame for the criminal justice crisis The Hill's Morning Report - Trump hews to NRA on guns and eyes lower taxes 10 declassified Russia collusion revelations that could rock Washington this fall MORE in contempt of Congress Wednesday, House Judiciary Chair Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerSecond Democrat representing Trump district backs impeachment GOP memo deflects some gun questions to 'violence from the left' House Democrats urge Trump to end deportations of Iraqis after diabetic man's death MORE (D-N.Y.) declared that the nation is in a "constitutional crisis" as the Trump administration digs in against Democrats' attempts at congressional oversight.

"We’ve talked for a long time about approaching a Constitutional crisis. We are now in it,” Nadler said in an afternoon press conference. 

"Now is the time of testing whether we can keep a republic, or whether this republic is destined to change into a different, more tyrannical form of government," he added "We must resist this."

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Nadler's Judiciary panel voted to hold Barr in contempt for failing to produce an un-redacted version of special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerMueller report fades from political conversation Trump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony MORE's report and its underlying evidence. The vote came the same day that President TrumpDonald John Trump Former US ambassador: 'Denmark is not a big fan of Donald Trump and his politics' Senate Democrats push for arms control language in defense policy bill Detroit county sheriff endorses Booker for president MORE moved to exert executive privilege over the report, which was released in redacted form last month.

Nadler's statements echo similar comments he made Wednesday morning before the House panel voted.

"The phrase constitutional crisis has been overused, but certainly," he said Wednesday morning, according to CNN. "Certainly, it's a constitutional crisis, although I don't like to use that phrase because it's been used for far less dangerous situations."

"We are in one because the president is disobeying the law, is refusing all information to Congress," he added.