Nadler: 'We are now in a constitutional crisis'

Nadler: 'We are now in a constitutional crisis'
© Greg Nash

After voting to hold Attorney General William BarrBill BarrWe haven't seen how low it can go Trump lashes out at Toomey, Romney after Roger Stone clemency criticism GOP senator says Trump commuting Stone was a 'mistake' MORE in contempt of Congress Wednesday, House Judiciary Chair Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerTexas Democrat proposes legislation requiring masks in federal facilities Nadler: Barr dealings with Berman came 'awfully close to bribery' Nadler wins Democratic primary MORE (D-N.Y.) declared that the nation is in a "constitutional crisis" as the Trump administration digs in against Democrats' attempts at congressional oversight.

"We’ve talked for a long time about approaching a Constitutional crisis. We are now in it,” Nadler said in an afternoon press conference. 

"Now is the time of testing whether we can keep a republic, or whether this republic is destined to change into a different, more tyrannical form of government," he added "We must resist this."

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Nadler's Judiciary panel voted to hold Barr in contempt for failing to produce an un-redacted version of special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's report and its underlying evidence. The vote came the same day that President TrumpDonald John TrumpWayfair refutes QAnon-like conspiracy theory that it's trafficking children Stone rails against US justice system in first TV interview since Trump commuted his sentence Federal appeals court rules Trump admin can't withhold federal grants from California sanctuary cities MORE moved to exert executive privilege over the report, which was released in redacted form last month.

Nadler's statements echo similar comments he made Wednesday morning before the House panel voted.

"The phrase constitutional crisis has been overused, but certainly," he said Wednesday morning, according to CNN. "Certainly, it's a constitutional crisis, although I don't like to use that phrase because it's been used for far less dangerous situations."

"We are in one because the president is disobeying the law, is refusing all information to Congress," he added.