Congressional leaders to launch budget talks with White House

Congressional leaders to launch budget talks with White House
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The top four congressional leaders of both parties are expected to meet with White House officials next week to discuss a two-year budget deal, a pair of sources confirmed Friday.
 
Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSupreme Court rulings reignite Trump oversight wars in Congress Pelosi on Baltimore's Columbus statue: 'If the community doesn't want the statue, the statue shouldn't be there' Pelosi says House won't cave to Senate on worker COVID-19 protections MORE (D-Calif.), House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthySupreme Court rulings reignite Trump oversight wars in Congress The Hill's Campaign Report: Florida's coronavirus surge raises questions about GOP convention McCarthy calls NY requests for Trump tax returns political MORE (R-Calif.), Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHouse chairman asks CDC director to testify on reopening schools during pandemic Senate GOP hedges on attending Trump's convention amid coronavirus uptick Pelosi says House won't cave to Senate on worker COVID-19 protections MORE (R-Ky.) and Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerA renewed emphasis on research and development funding is needed from the government Data shows seven Senate Democrats have majority non-white staffs Trump may be DACA participants' best hope, but will Democrats play ball? MORE (D-N.Y.) will kick off talks as deadlines to avoid another government shutdown and raise the debt ceiling loom this fall.
 
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A congressional source added that Hill leadership had agreed to meet with Mnuchin and other administration officials to discuss the budget caps on defense and non-defense spending.
 
The meeting comes after Mulvaney met with McConnell on Thursday to discuss spending and amid growing concerns on Capitol Hill about avoiding across-the-board cuts known as sequestration.
 
Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyFinger-pointing, gridlock spark frustration in Senate Democrats sidestep budget deal by seeking 0B in emergency spending Fights over police reform, COVID-19 delay Senate appropriations markups MORE (R-Ala.) indicated on Thursday that leadership was trying to set up a meeting with the White House next week to discuss a budget cap deal.
 
"What could come out of it is an agreement, where we can move our approps, a number," Shelby told The Hill when asked what could come out of the White House talks. "Or nothing could come out if, you've been here, you've seen."
 
A senior White House official told The Hill that "it’s still too early to speculate on what the outcome of these discussions will be, but as deficit spending continues to drive up our national debt, the Administration will continue to push for fiscal responsibility."
 
 
Lawmakers have been sounding the alarm about the need to keep the government open, with current funding set to expire at the end of September. They'll also need to raise the debt ceiling later this year to avoid defaulting, with the Treasury Department expected to be able to extend the deadline until September or October.
 
Unless lawmakers reach a deal on spending, about $120 billion in automatic cuts to defense and domestic programs would go into effect under sequestration. 
 
Separately, Pelosi and Schumer plan to meet with Trump next Wednesday to follow up on their recent meeting about a $2 trillion infrastructure plan.
 
—Updated at 4:26 p.m. Brett Samuels contributed.