More Dems press Pelosi on impeachment proceedings: reports

House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiAs coronavirus surges, Trump tries to dismantle healthcare for millions Sunday shows preview: Coronavirus poses questions about school safety; Trump commutes Roger Stone sentence Pelosi plans legislation to limit pardons, commutations after Roger Stone move MORE (D-Calif.) is facing increased pressure to support impeachment from Democratic House colleagues but has counseled other Democratic leaders to let investigations of President TrumpDonald John TrumpDeSantis on Florida schools reopening: 'If you can do Walmart,' then 'we absolutely can do schools' NYT editorial board calls for the reopening of schools with help from federal government's 'checkbook' Mueller pens WaPo op-ed: Roger Stone 'remains a convicted felon, and rightly so' MORE run their course, according to a Politico report.

During a leadership meeting on Monday, Pelosi and allies in House leadership, including Reps. Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesReparations bill gains steam following death of George Floyd Karen Bass's star rises after leading police reform push The Hill's 12:30 Report: Supreme Court ruling marks big win for abortion rights groups MORE (D-N.Y.) and Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosTime for a Democratic reckoning on race  Karen Bass's star rises after leading police reform push GOP pulls support from California House candidate over 'unacceptable' social media posts MORE (D-Ill.), pushed back on calls from other Democratic leaders, including Reps. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineNadler: Barr dealings with Berman came 'awfully close to bribery' OVERNIGHT ENERGY: DOJ whistleblower says California emissions probe was 'abuse of authority' | EPA won't defend policy blocking grantees from serving on boards | Minnesota sues Exxon, others over climate change DOJ whistleblower: California emissions probe was 'abuse of authority' MORE (D-R.I.) and Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinDemocrats start cracking down on masks for lawmakers Clyburn threatens to end in-person coronavirus committee hearings if Republicans won't wear masks The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Dems, GOP dig in on police reform ahead of House vote MORE (D-Md.), to begin impeachment proceedings, Politico reported, citing multiple sources.

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According to a Washington Post report, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerNadler: Barr dealings with Berman came 'awfully close to bribery' Nadler wins Democratic primary Voters must strongly reject the president's abuses by voting him out this November MORE (D-N.Y.) has met privately with Pelosi to recommend starting an impeachment inquiry but was reportedly rebuffed by the Speaker, who argued the move lacks support among other caucus members and it could undermine other ongoing House investigations.

After his meeting with Pelosi, Nadler, while he did not rule out impeachment, appeared sympathetic to Pelosi’s perspective, according to the Post, citing a Monday ruling from a federal judge upholding a Democratic subpoena as evidence other institutions could support oversight of the Trump administration.

“We have an active inquiry going, and we have to enforce the right to our testimony through the courts, which is the only way you can do it,” Nadler said, according to the Post. “And right now we’re having very good success with it.”

Pelosi and her allies argued the dispute over impeachment is stealing oxygen from Democratic messaging on other political issues.

Raskin, a former law professor, argued that even if the House did not outright impeach Trump, an impeachment inquiry could allow the party to both make the case for removing Trump and pursue its legislative agenda at the same time, according to Politico.

Pelosi reportedly pushed back, asking Raskin if he wanted to “tell Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsFacial recognition tools under fresh scrutiny amid police protests The sad spectacle of Trump's enablers Democrat Kweisi Mfume wins House primary in Maryland MORE to go home,” referencing ongoing investigations into the Trump administration by the House Oversight and Reform Committee chairman, as well as four other committees engaged in similar investigations.