Muslim lawmakers host Ramadan iftar to break fast at Capitol

Muslim lawmakers host Ramadan iftar to break fast at Capitol
© Greg Nash

Three Muslim members of Congress hosted a historic iftar dinner on Monday to celebrate the holy month of Ramadan and honor the contributions of the Muslim American community.

Reps. André Carson (D-Ind.), Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibHillicon Valley: Biden calls for revoking tech legal shield | DHS chief 'fully expects' Russia to try to interfere in 2020 | Smaller companies testify against Big Tech 'monopoly power' Michigan governor urges Zuckerberg to enforce community guidelines after hate speech, threats surface Ayanna Pressley's 'squad' of congresswomen offers support after she opens up about alopecia MORE (D-Mich.) and Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarAyanna Pressley's 'squad' of congresswomen offers support after she opens up about alopecia With surge in anti-Semitism, political leaders need to be aggressive and reflective in response Congressional Progressive Caucus co-chair endorses Sanders MORE (D-Minn.) hosted the meal to break Monday's Ramadan fast, the first time Muslim lawmakers have hosted an iftar.

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Civil rights organization Muslim Advocates co-hosted the event.

Among the guests were Reps. Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerHouse poised to hand impeachment articles to Senate House to vote on Iran war powers bills sought by progressives Khanna: Timing of Iran bill being weighed against getting bigger majority MORE (D-Md.), Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezAyanna Pressley's 'squad' of congresswomen offers support after she opens up about alopecia Here are the 10 senators who voted against Trump's North American trade deal Artist paints Michelle Obama, other women as battered in campaign against domestic violence MORE (D-N.Y.) and Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalHouse to investigate Trump 'Remain in Mexico' policy Democrats don't expect to do 2020 budget House to vote Thursday on war powers resolution after Iran attacks MORE (D-Wash.), Senate Minority Whip Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinOvernight Defense: Book says Trump called military leaders 'dopes and babies' | House reinvites Pompeo for Iran hearing | Dems urge Esper to reject border wall funding request Senate Dems urge Esper to oppose shifting Pentagon money to border wall Trump's trial a major test for McConnell, Schumer MORE (D-Ill.) and Mayor Sadaf Jaffer of Montgomery Township, New Jersey.

Speaker of the House Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiRepublicans will pay on Election Day for politicizing Trump's impeachment Trump chooses high-profile but controversial legal team Trump: Impeachment timing intended to hurt Sanders MORE (D-Calif.) was scheduled to attend but could not.

"This was a historic night. For the first time, three Muslim-American Members of Congress hosted an iftar in the United States Capitol during the holy month of Ramadan—joined by leaders of both Houses of Congress," Omar said in a statement.

"It was a reminder that we are a nation founded on religious liberty, where people seeking opportunity and a better life can find it, regardless of their faith. And it demonstrated that Muslim-Americans are a vital part of the American fabric, worthy of representation at our highest levels of government."

“It’s important to take a moment to recognize how historic this iftar is," Tlaib added. "My existence, along with the other dynamic Muslim members of Congress go beyond the lines of our districts, our presence challenges the narrative of who’s at the table and who deserves to have a voice in our government. This event lifts an entire community that has felt unseen for far too long."

President TrumpDonald John TrumpNational Archives says it altered Trump signs, other messages in Women's March photo Dems plan marathon prep for Senate trial, wary of Trump trying to 'game' the process Democratic lawmaker dismisses GOP lawsuit threat: 'Take your letter and shove it' MORE hosted his own iftar last week which some of the largest Muslim organizations in the country said they were not invited to.

The White House didn't release a guest list for the event.