Muslim lawmakers host Ramadan iftar to break fast at Capitol

Muslim lawmakers host Ramadan iftar to break fast at Capitol
© Greg Nash

Three Muslim members of Congress hosted a historic iftar dinner on Monday to celebrate the holy month of Ramadan and honor the contributions of the Muslim American community.

Reps. André Carson (D-Ind.), Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibClimate advocates turn sights on Wall Street House progressives call on Biden to end all new fossil fuel permitting Ilhan Omar to Biden: 'Deliver on your promise to cancel student debt' MORE (D-Mich.) and Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarDozens of Democrats call for spending bill to pass 'climate test' House progressives call on Biden to end all new fossil fuel permitting Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by the American Petroleum Institute — Democrats address reports that clean energy program will be axed MORE (D-Minn.) hosted the meal to break Monday's Ramadan fast, the first time Muslim lawmakers have hosted an iftar.

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Civil rights organization Muslim Advocates co-hosted the event.

Among the guests were Reps. Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerPelosi: Democrats within striking distance of deal Powerful Democrats push back on one-year extension of child tax credit The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Uber - Democrats optimistic after Biden meetings MORE (D-Md.), Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezRepublican spin on Biden is off the mark House progressives call on Biden to end all new fossil fuel permitting Schumer endorses democratic socialist India Walton in Buffalo mayor's race MORE (D-N.Y.) and Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalMatt Stroller: Amazon's Bezos likely lied under oath before Congress Which proposals will survive in the Democrats' spending plan? Proposals to reform supports for parents face chopping block MORE (D-Wash.), Senate Minority Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinManchin: Negotiators to miss Friday target for deal on reconciliation bill Democrats look for plan B on filibuster The Memo: Cuts to big bill vex Democrats MORE (D-Ill.) and Mayor Sadaf Jaffer of Montgomery Township, New Jersey.

Speaker of the House Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDems look to keep tax on billionaires in spending bill Sunday shows - Democrats' spending plan in the spotlight Pelosi won't say if she'll run for reelection in 2022 MORE (D-Calif.) was scheduled to attend but could not.

"This was a historic night. For the first time, three Muslim-American Members of Congress hosted an iftar in the United States Capitol during the holy month of Ramadan—joined by leaders of both Houses of Congress," Omar said in a statement.

"It was a reminder that we are a nation founded on religious liberty, where people seeking opportunity and a better life can find it, regardless of their faith. And it demonstrated that Muslim-Americans are a vital part of the American fabric, worthy of representation at our highest levels of government."

“It’s important to take a moment to recognize how historic this iftar is," Tlaib added. "My existence, along with the other dynamic Muslim members of Congress go beyond the lines of our districts, our presence challenges the narrative of who’s at the table and who deserves to have a voice in our government. This event lifts an entire community that has felt unseen for far too long."

President TrumpDonald TrumpSix big off-year elections you might be missing Twitter suspends GOP Rep. Banks for misgendering trans health official Meghan McCain to Trump: 'Thanks for the publicity' MORE hosted his own iftar last week which some of the largest Muslim organizations in the country said they were not invited to.

The White House didn't release a guest list for the event.