Judiciary Democrat: 'Most of us have been led to the position that an impeachment inquiry is warranted'

Judiciary Democrat: 'Most of us have been led to the position that an impeachment inquiry is warranted'
© Greg Nash

House Judiciary Committee member Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinEx-Trump aide on Russia testifies for 10 hours as part of impeachment inquiry Oversight panel to subpoena Trump officials next week over deportation deferrals Democrats plow ahead as Trump seeks to hobble impeachment effort MORE (D-Md.) said Wednesday that an impeachment inquiry into President TrumpDonald John TrumpBusiness school deans call for lifting country-specific visa caps Bolton told ex-Trump aide to call White House lawyers about Ukraine pressure campaign: report Federal prosecutors in New York examining Giuliani business dealings with Ukraine: report MORE is "warranted."

Raskin cited the Trump administration's "aggressive obstruction" of congressional attempts to get information in a number of congressional subpoenas

Raskin, asked by The Washington Post whether a majority of the caucus was on board yet with impeachment, said it was "hard to know."

ADVERTISEMENT

"Hard to know, but this conversation is built into the committee system," he said. "We are intimately familiar with the president’s aggressive obstruction of the congressional fact-finding function," he added. "So most of us have been led to the position that an impeachment inquiry is warranted."

Raskin added that he believes there should be an impeachment inquiry based on "overwhelming evidence" presented in special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerFox News legal analyst says Trump call with Ukraine leader could be 'more serious' than what Mueller 'dragged up' Lewandowski says Mueller report was 'very clear' in proving 'there was no obstruction,' despite having 'never' read it Fox's Cavuto roasts Trump over criticism of network MORE's report into Russian election interference and possible obstruction of justice by Trump.

"Overwhelming evidence has been presented to us in the Mueller report, and outside of it too, of high crimes and misdemeanors, and we should launch an impeachment inquiry," he said. "Remember, an inquiry doesn’t prejudge the outcome. We’re not talking about articles of impeachment." 

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffEx-Trump aide on Russia testifies for 10 hours as part of impeachment inquiry Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Trump to slap sanctions on Turkey for Syria offensive | Trump calls on Turkey to broker ceasefire | Pelosi, Graham seek deal on sanctions | Ex-Trump aide testifies in impeachment probe GOP rep says he was kicked out of Trump aide's deposition MORE (D-Calif.) said Tuesday that he believes the case for an impeachment inquiry is "getting stronger" as the administration continues to "stonewall" Congress.

His comments come after the Trump administration rejected several congressional subpoenas in recent weeks.

Last week, the White House rejected a House Judiciary Committee subpoena for oversight records. The Treasury Department also defied a congressional demand for Trump's tax returns, and, on Tuesday, former White House counsel Don McGahn did not appear to testify before the House despite a subpoena. 

Schiff, who was once skeptical of impeachment, said Sunday that impeachment could be a "tool" to gain information. 

An impeachment inquiry is an investigation and is not an impeachment floor vote to bring charges against the president.