Judiciary Democrat: 'Most of us have been led to the position that an impeachment inquiry is warranted'

Judiciary Democrat: 'Most of us have been led to the position that an impeachment inquiry is warranted'
© Greg Nash

House Judiciary Committee member Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinHouse erupts in anger over Jan. 6 and Trump's role Oversight Democrats launch investigation into GOP Arizona election audit Sanders on Richardson Olympic suspension: 'Speaks to the problems' of the 'war on drugs' MORE (D-Md.) said Wednesday that an impeachment inquiry into President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump hails Arizona Senate for audit at Phoenix rally, slams governor Arkansas governor says it's 'disappointing' vaccinations have become 'political' Watch live: Trump attends rally in Phoenix MORE is "warranted."

Raskin cited the Trump administration's "aggressive obstruction" of congressional attempts to get information in a number of congressional subpoenas

Raskin, asked by The Washington Post whether a majority of the caucus was on board yet with impeachment, said it was "hard to know."

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"Hard to know, but this conversation is built into the committee system," he said. "We are intimately familiar with the president’s aggressive obstruction of the congressional fact-finding function," he added. "So most of us have been led to the position that an impeachment inquiry is warranted."

Raskin added that he believes there should be an impeachment inquiry based on "overwhelming evidence" presented in special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerSenate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel MORE's report into Russian election interference and possible obstruction of justice by Trump.

"Overwhelming evidence has been presented to us in the Mueller report, and outside of it too, of high crimes and misdemeanors, and we should launch an impeachment inquiry," he said. "Remember, an inquiry doesn’t prejudge the outcome. We’re not talking about articles of impeachment." 

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffHouse erupts in anger over Jan. 6 and Trump's role Six takeaways: What the FEC reports tell us about the midterm elections Lobbying world MORE (D-Calif.) said Tuesday that he believes the case for an impeachment inquiry is "getting stronger" as the administration continues to "stonewall" Congress.

His comments come after the Trump administration rejected several congressional subpoenas in recent weeks.

Last week, the White House rejected a House Judiciary Committee subpoena for oversight records. The Treasury Department also defied a congressional demand for Trump's tax returns, and, on Tuesday, former White House counsel Don McGahn did not appear to testify before the House despite a subpoena. 

Schiff, who was once skeptical of impeachment, said Sunday that impeachment could be a "tool" to gain information. 

An impeachment inquiry is an investigation and is not an impeachment floor vote to bring charges against the president.