WHIP LIST: The 228 House Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry

More than 90 percent of the House Democratic caucus has said they support an impeachment inquiry for President TrumpDonald John TrumpRepublicans consider skipping witnesses in Trump impeachment trial Bombshell Afghanistan report bolsters calls for end to 'forever wars' Lawmakers dismiss Chinese retaliatory threat to US tech MORE.

While Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump trade deal likely to sow division in Democratic presidential field Trump supporters at Pa. rally 'upset' after Democrats introduce impeachment articles California GOP candidate arrested on stalking charges MORE (D-Calif.) for months resisted calling for an inquiry, in part from worries that doing so could imperil Democrats who won swing districts in 2018, she announced Sept. 24 that she supports a formal impeachment inquiry.

"The President must be held accountable. No one is above the law," she said.

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Former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump says he'll release financial records before election, knocks Dems' efforts House impeachment hearings: The witch hunt continues Speier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump MORE's testimony in July led to a new wave of Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry, and the president's attacks on Democratic members of Congress, including Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsTrump request for Ukrainian 'favor' tops notable quote list Impeachment can't wait Adam Schiff's star rises with impeachment hearings MORE (D-Md.), almost certainly led more support to the charge.

A flurry of Democrats including Pelosi and Democratic leaders came out in favor of an impeachment inquiry in September shortly after reports that Trump pressured his Ukrainian counterpart to investigate Joe BidenJoe BidenRepublicans consider skipping witnesses in Trump impeachment trial Trump trade deal likely to sow division in Democratic presidential field Trump supporters at Pa. rally 'upset' after Democrats introduce impeachment articles MORE and the Democratic presidential frontrunner’s son.

Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashGroup of Democrats floating censure of Trump instead of impeachment: report Democrats gear up for high-stakes Judiciary hearing Here are the Senate Republicans who could vote to convict Trump MORE (Mich.) is the only non-Democrat in the House to back an impeachment inquiry. He became the first Republican to say Trump has engaged in impeachable conduct — but later quit the GOP and became an independent. 

It would take 218 votes in the House to impeach Trump, and 67 votes in the Senate to convict him. 

Though there are 228 Democrats in favor of having launched the inquiry, not all have come out in favor of impeachment.

Here's a tally of which Democratic lawmakers endorse launching an impeachment inquiry of Trump.

This list will be updated.

Democrats calling for impeachment inquiry (228)

 

Alma AdamsAlma Shealey AdamsDemocrats likely to gain seats under new North Carolina maps Giving light to the insulin crisis GOP senator blasts Dem bills on 'opportunity zones' MORE (N.C.)

"Impeachment is not off the table. However, before we move forward the American people deserve all the facts. That is why I support an impeachment inquiry. Congress has a sacred responsibility to obtain the information necessary to determine the next steps," Adams said in a statement two days after Mueller's remarks.

 

Pete AguilarPeter (Pete) Ray AguilarHispanic Caucus dedicates Day of the Dead altar to migrants who died in US custody Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to testify on Libra | Extremists find home on Telegram app | Warren blasts Facebook for not removing anti-Biden ad | California outlaws facial recognition in police body cameras | China rips US tech sanctions House Democrats introduce new legislation to combat foreign election interference MORE (Calif.)

"Special Counsel Mueller's report and testimony clearly outlined unacceptable, inappropriate and potentially criminal conduct by the president, including obstruction of justice," Aguilar said in a statement Aug. 1.

"After careful consideration and conversations with members of my community, I believe it is time for the House to begin proceedings to determine whether the president's conduct meets the standards of impeachment.

 

Colin Allred (Texas)

Allred on Sept. 24 called on the acting director of national intelligence to turn over the whistleblower complaint against Trump to the House Intelligence Committee upon appearing for a scheduled hearing. “If he does not, and this Administration continues to violate the law and obstruct Congress’s constitutional duty, I will be forced to conclude that the only remaining option is for the House to begin impeachment proceedings," Allred said.

 

Cindy AxneCindy AxneIowa Democrat tops Ernst in third-quarter fundraising for Senate race Pelosi-backed group funding ads for vulnerable Democrats amid impeachment inquiry Centrist House Democrats press for committees to follow pay-go rule MORE (Iowa)

Axne, who flipped a GOP-held district last fall, endorsed an impeachment inquiry on Sept. 24. “For the sake of our national security and our democracy, these serious allegations require independent Congressional investigation unobstructed by this Administration. Congress has a responsibility to uphold the rule of law and to take appropriate steps to open an impeachment inquiry," Axne said.

 

Nanette Diaz Barragán (Calif.)

A spokeswoman for Barragán confirmed to The Hill that the California Democrat supports an impeachment inquiry.

 

Karen BassKaren Ruth BassThe US treats asylum seekers so poorly Lawmakers visit African migrants at US-Mexico border Preventative measures are needed in child welfare policy, data shows MORE (Calif.)

“Ever since Trump set foot in the Oval Office, he has been on a mission to rip apart decades of policies that protect civil rights, the environment, public lands and more," Bass said in a Sept. 24 statement. "He has embarrassed our nation in the eyes of the world with his regular display of ignorance of treaties and historic alliances along with his horrific treatment of families and violation of international laws at our borders.

“It is time for a formal impeachment inquiry against this lawless and unstable President.”

 

Joyce BeattyJoyce Birdson BeattyProgressive group unveils first slate of 2020 congressional endorsements Action needed to protect women in the workforce Stars turn out as Chappelle receives Mark Twain Prize MORE (Ohio)

"I support Congress continuing to use our oversight and investigative tools to get to the bottom of any wrongdoing. I ultimately believe this process will lead to an impeachment inquiry, which I would support for the people and to keep America great," Beatty said in a statement on May 31.

 

Ami BeraAmerish (Ami) Babulal BeraKrystal Ball: New Biden ad is everything that's wrong with Democrats Overnight Defense: Trump cancels presser, cuts short NATO trip | Viral video catches leaders appearing to gossip about Trump | Dem witnesses say Trump committed impeachable offenses | Trump reportedly mulling more troops in Middle East Pelosi to Democrats: 'Are you ready?' MORE (Calif.)

Bera said Sept. 24 that supports an impeachment inquiry and that he believes Trump has committed impeachable offenses. “After reading the Mueller Report and witnessing the President’s actions, it has been clear to me that President Trump has committed impeachable offenses and went to great lengths to commit obstruction of justice on several occasions," Bera said. "Multiple committees with jurisdiction have been conducting important and necessary oversight, including investigating and holding hearings into obstruction, corruption, and abuse of power by President Trump. I have supported the committees' actions and will continue to do so, including an impeachment inquiry."

 

Don Beyer (Va.)

Beyer previously endorsed an impeachment inquiry in May, but on June 24 went further and said that he would support articles of impeachment in light of the intelligence community whistleblower allegations against Trump. “I really don’t see any alternative to actual Articles of Impeachment right now,” Beyer told ARLNow on Sept. 24. “If we don’t act now, I think we lose all credibility as elected representatives and we violate our oath of office.”

 

Sanford Bishop (Ga.)

"The allegations that the President withheld Congressionally appropriated taxpayer dollars for national security as leverage against a foreign power to pursue unfounded allegations against a political opponent at home are extremely alarming. Taken with the Mueller report and the facts discovered by the other ongoing Committee investigations, we have reached a point where Congress must move forward with an impeachment inquiry," Bishop said Sept. 24.



Earl BlumenauerEarl BlumenauerLobbying world Hillicon Valley: Progressives oppose funding bill over surveillance authority | Senators call for 5G security coordinator | Facebook gets questions over location tracking | Louisiana hit by ransomware attack Progressives oppose spending stopgap measure over surveillance authority extension MORE (Ore.)

Blumenauer signed on to Tlaib’s resolution.

 

Lisa Blunt Rochester (Del.)
 
“During Director Mueller’s seven hours of testimony yesterday, he made it very clear that President Trump was not exonerated in his investigation and that the President wasn’t always truthful in the written answers he submitted. These uncertainties, along with the evident misconduct of the President, warrant an impeachment inquiry so that the American people can finally hear the whole truth that they are entitled to,” Blunt Rochester said in a statement on July 25. 

 

Suzanne BonamiciSuzanne Marie BonamiciPelosi heading to Madrid for UN climate change convention Scientists join Democrats in panning EPA's 'secret science' rule Overnight Energy: Democrats call for Ross to resign over report he threatened NOAA officials | Commerce denies report | Documents detail plan to decentralize BLM | Lawmakers demand answers on bee-killing pesticide MORE (Ore.)

"The House of Representatives must begin an impeachment inquiry," Bonamici tweeted.

 

Brendan Boyle (Pa.)

"It’s clear now that Congress must hold hearings on the findings of the Special Counsel, including the witnesses who gave testimony to investigators. It’s time to officially start Impeachment Hearings," Boyle tweeted on May 29 after Mueller spoke.

 

Anthony BrownAnthony Gregory BrownSunday Show Preview: Trump's allies and administration defend decision on Syria A dozen House Democrats call on EU ambassador to resign amid Ukraine scandal Assault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress MORE (Md.)

"I fully support the House Judiciary Committee’s formal inquiry into whether to recommend impeachment of President Trump, and I know they will continue to do the hard work to protect our democracy, constitution, and the American people," Brown tweeted on Aug. 16.

 

Julia BrownleyJulia Andrews BrownleyPelosi heading to Madrid for UN climate change convention A dozen House Democrats call on EU ambassador to resign amid Ukraine scandal Katherine Clark quietly eyes leadership ascent MORE (Calif.)

"I believe the Mueller report, on its own, shows egregious encouragement for a foreign adversary to undermine our democracy, and irrefutable evidence of obstruction of justice," Brownley said in a statement on July 23, the day before special counsel Robert Mueller was set to testify before Congress. "Further, President Trump’s repeated statements that he invites future illegal, foreign interference in our elections, his repeated current attempts to obstruct Congress’ oversight authority, and his clear intent to continue to obstruct justice and the will of Congress, create an urgency of action. I am, therefore, calling for the immediate opening of an impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump."

 

Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Pelosi accuses Trump of 'bribery' in Ukraine dealings DCCC adds senior staffers after summer departures DCCC raises more than M in October MORE (Ill.)

"I support the House Intelligence Committee’s search for the truth in this impeachment inquiry," Bustos, the chairwoman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, said Sept. 25.

 

G.K. ButterfieldGeorge (G.K.) Kenneth ButterfieldDemocrats likely to gain seats under new North Carolina maps North Carolina poised to pass new congressional maps Black leaders say African American support in presidential primary is fluid MORE (N.C.)

“The evidence that has been produced so far is sufficient in my opinion to support an impeachment inquiry and impeachment and removal,” Butterfield told McClatchy on May 30. “I am prepared to vote for an impeachment inquiry ... and I will vote for impeachment and removal.”

 

Salud CarbajalSalud CarbajalOvernight Energy: Lawmakers show irritation over withheld Interior documents | Republican offers bipartisan carbon tax bill | Scientists booted from EPA panel form new group GOP congressman introduces bipartisan carbon tax bill Hispanic Democrats: ICE raids designed to distract from Trump ties to Epstein MORE (Calif.)

Carbajal said on Aug. 2 that he backed an impeachment inquiry, stating that Trump cannot be "above the law."

 

Tony Cárdenas (Calif.)

"After carefully studying the Mueller report and watching how this President instructs current and former officials to ignore Congressional subpoenas and to act unlawfully, Congress has no choice but to open an impeachment inquiry into President Trump," Cárdenas said in a statement on June 20.

 

Andre CarsonAndré CarsonPelosi's whiplash moment brings praise and criticism Adam Schiff's star rises with impeachment hearings Live coverage: Schiff closes with speech highlighting claims of Trump's corruption MORE (Ind.)

Carson voted in favor of an impeachment resolution from Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenDemocrats reach cusp of impeachment Feehery: Losing faith in the people and the Constitution Warren, Buttigieg fight echoes 2004 campaign, serves as warning for 2020 race MORE (D-Texas) on July 17. A spokesman for Carson confirmed to The Hill that he supports launching an impeachment inquiry.

 

Matt CartwrightMatthew (Matt) Alton CartwrightPETA asks DOJ to stop conducting training that harms animals Lawmakers express concern to DOJ over training involving 'stabbing, burning and shooting' animals Assault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress MORE (Pa.)

“At some point, it becomes necessary to announce certain conduct by an American president as unacceptable. There have been credible allegations this week that the President abused the power of his office, on the international stage, for his own political gain," Cartwright said in a statement on Sept. 24. "We need to get to the bottom of these serious allegations through comprehensive impeachment proceedings and document production. Whether such hearings result in actual impeachment of the president and/or senior cabinet officials remains to be seen.”

 

Ed CaseEdward (Ed) CaseMORE (Hawaii)

"Together with other claimed breaches and the President's continued obstruction of Congressional oversight, they fully justify Congress reviewing potential impeachment," Case said of the Ukraine controversy on Sept. 24.

 

Sean CastenSean CastenPelosi warns of 'existential' climate threat, vows bold action Pelosi heading to Madrid for UN climate change convention Democrat unveils bill requiring banks to identify suspicious activity related to guns MORE (Ill.)

"I do not celebrate this moment but neither do I shirk from this responsibility; the truth must prevail," he said in a statement on June 20.

 

Kathy CastorKatherine (Kathy) Anne CastorOvernight Energy: Pelosi vows bold action to counter 'existential' climate threat | Trump jokes new light bulbs don't make him look as good | 'Forever chemicals' measure pulled from defense bill Pelosi warns of 'existential' climate threat, vows bold action Overnight Energy: Pelosi vows to push for Paris climate goals | Senate confirms Brouillette to succeed Perry at Energy | EPA under attack from all sides over ethanol rule MORE (Fla.)

“Withholding foreign aid to Ukraine in an attempt to encourage interference in the next U.S. presidential election is a breach of the public trust. And blocking a U.S. intelligence complaint labeled ‘urgent concern’, filed with the independent inspector general and flagged to the Office of the Director of National Intelligence is against the law," Castor said in a Sept. 24 statement.

"Trump has violated his oath of office. He operates for himself, in his personal interest – and not in the interest of the American people," she added. "The impeachment inquiry should be put on the fast track and all of the facts made plain.”

 

Joaquin CastroJoaquin CastroHispanic Democrats demand flu vaccines for detained migrants Pelosi faces tough choices on impeachment managers Hillicon Valley: Google to limit political ad targeting | Senators scrutinize self-driving car safety | Trump to 'look at' Apple tariff exemption | Progressive lawmakers call for surveillance reforms | House panel advances telecom bills MORE (Texas)

“It’s time for Congress to open an impeachment inquiry. There is political risk in doing so, but there’s a greater risk to our country in doing nothing,” Castro tweeted. “This is a fight for our democracy.”

 

Judy ChuJudy May ChuHillicon Valley: FCC moves against Huawei, ZTE | Dem groups ask Google to reconsider ads policy | Bill introduced to increase data access during probes Dems call out Oracle for lack of diversity on its board Bicameral group of Democrats introduces bill to protect immigrant laborers MORE (Calif.)

"I believe it is time for Congress to open an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. The proceedings must be deliberate and transparent. We have a sacred duty as members of Congress to ensure that nobody is above the law. To do nothing given what we know is unacceptable,” she said in part in a statement July 31. Chu is chair of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus. 

 

David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineHouse Democrats expected to unveil articles of impeachment Tuesday Tempers flare at tense Judiciary hearing on impeachment Hillicon Valley: Amazon alleges Trump interfered in Pentagon contract to hurt Bezos | Federal council warns Trump of cyber threats to infrastructure | China to remove foreign technology from government offices MORE (R.I.)

Cicilline, a member of Democratic leadership and the House Judiciary Committee, called for starting an impeachment inquiry if McGahn didn't appear for the hearing.

“If Don McGahn does not testify tomorrow, it will be time to begin an impeachment inquiry of @realDonaldTrump,” Cicilline tweeted on the eve of McGahn's absence from the Judiciary Committee hearing.

 

Gil CisnerosGilbert (Gil) Ray CisnerosMORE (Calif.)

Cisneros and six other freshman House Democrats largely representing competitive districts wrote in a Washington Post op-ed on Sept. 23 that if the allegations that Trump pressed Ukraine's leader to investigate Biden "are true, we believe these actions represent an impeachable offense." "We do not arrive at this conclusion lightly, and we call on our colleagues in Congress to consider the use of all congressional authorities available to us, including the power of “inherent contempt” and impeachment hearings, to address these new allegations, find the truth and protect our national security," they wrote.

 

Katherine ClarkKatherine Marlea ClarkThe Hill's Morning Report - Fallout from day one of Trump impeachment hearing 'Squad' members recruit Raskin to run for Oversight gavel House passes third bill aimed at preventing foreign election interference MORE (Mass.)

Clark, the Democratic caucus vice chair, on July 25 became the highest-ranking member of leadership to back an impeachment inquiry.

"I deeply respect the committee work of House Democrats to hold the president accountable, including hearings, subpoenas and lawsuits. All of our efforts to put the facts before the American people, however, have been met with unprecedented stonewalling and obstruction. That is why I believe we need to open an impeachment inquiry that will provide us a more formal way to fully uncover the facts," Clark said in a statement the day after Mueller's testimony.

 

Yvette ClarkeYvette Diane ClarkeThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - Democrats to release articles of impeachment today Lawmakers visit African migrants at US-Mexico border Democratic lawmaker introduces bill to tackle online terrorist activity MORE (N.Y.)

"America is better than having a lying, corrupt, Bigot-in-Chief. Enough with 45’s nonsense. It’s time for an impeachment inquiry. #notmypresident" Clarke tweeted on June 18. She also co-sponsored Tlaib's resolution.

 

Wm. Lacy ClayWilliam (Lacy) Lacy ClayLawmakers honor JFK on 56th anniversary of his death Trump tax breaks for low-income neighborhoods draw scrutiny Maloney wins vote for Oversight chairwoman MORE (Mo.)

"Impeachment is the only constitutionally available remedy that would directly address President Trump's blatant and repeated attempts to obstruct justice and repeatedly lied to Congress, and most importantly lied to the American people," Clay said in a statement on June 21. Clay co-sponsored both Tlaib's resolution and an article of impeachment from Rep. Brad ShermanBradley (Brad) James ShermanThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by UANI — GOP, Democrats square off at final impeachment hearing Live coverage: Democrats, Republicans seek to win PR battle in final House impeachment hearing Mnuchin expresses concerns about proposed taxes on financial trades MORE (D-Calif.) that accuses Trump of obstructing justice.

 

Emanuel Cleaver (Mo.)

"After reading Special Counsel Mueller’s redacted report and listening to his testimony, it’s clear to me that they indicate the President committed one or more instances of obstruction of justice while in office," he said in a July 29 statement. "When looking at the evidence presented, there is obviously enough smoke to investigate the potential fire of corruption."

 

James Clyburn (S.C.)

The majority whip echoed Pelosi on Sept. 24, saying that "this is about protecting our national security, standing up for the rule of law, and patriotism. I support the official impeachment inquiry announced by the Speaker today."

 

Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenOvernight Defense: Dems unveil impeachment articles against Trump | Saudi military flight students grounded after shooting | Defense bill takes heat from progressives | Pentagon watchdog to probe use of personnel on border Democrats unveil articles of impeachment against Trump The Hill's Morning Report - Dem dilemma on articles of impeachment MORE (Tenn.)

Cohen introduced articles of impeachment in the previous session of Congress that accused Trump of obstructing justice. “I think he's committed impeachable offenses and he ought to be impeached,” said Cohen, a Judiciary Committee member.

 

Lou CorreaJose (Lou) Luis CorreaDemocrats reach cusp of impeachment Blue Dogs issue new call for House leaders to abide by pay-go rule FBI chief says racist extremists fueling one another, making connections overseas MORE (Calif.)

"Congress must act quickly and judiciously to ascertain all the facts about this egregious abuse of power by a sitting President. No one is above the law,” he said in a statement on Sept. 25.

 

Jim CostaJames (Jim) Manuel CostaChina, US officials: 'Phase one' trade deal could slide into next year Fresno congressman calls for Senate to take up gun legislation after deadly mass shooting at football party Overnight Defense: Protests at Trump's NYC Veterans Day speech | House Dems release Pentagon official's deposition transcript | Lawmakers ask Trump to rescind Erdogan invite MORE (Calif.)

"I support an official impeachment investigation," Costa said in a statement on Sept. 24. "We should not jump to premature conclusions. We must follow the facts where they lead."

 

Bonnie Watson ColemanBonnie Watson ColemanAllegations of bed bugs at Trump's Doral resort swarm Twitter A dozen House Democrats call on EU ambassador to resign amid Ukraine scandal Democrats seize on viral Sharpie hashtags to mock Trump map edit MORE (N.J.)

"The President has shown a disregard not only for Congress's oversight powers, but disregard for the rulings of the Supreme Court. I promised to fight for my constituents and that's why I'm calling for an #ImpeachmentInquiryNow. Keep speaking up, keep standing up, keep showing up," Watson Coleman tweeted on July 11.

 

Gerry ConnollyGerald (Gerry) Edward ConnollyDemocrats debate scope of impeachment charges House Democrats rebuke State Department for 'reversal' on Israeli settlements Maloney wins House Oversight gavel MORE (Va.)

"We stand at a perilous moment for our country. No individual should be above the law. No individual should act the way this president behaves without consequence. No administration should be allowed to disregard the constitution at their whim. Now more than ever, Congress must assert its constitutional role and that is why I believe we must immediately start an impeachment inquiry into President Trump,” he said in a statement on Aug. 8.

 

Jim CooperJames (Jim) Hayes Shofner CooperOvernight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Buttigieg targets Warren, Sanders on health care ahead of debate | Judge overturns ObamaCare transgender protections | Poll sees support drop for 'Medicare for All' The Memo: Democrats plunge into politics of impeachment Taylor Swift 'obsessed' with politics, says she's cautious about celebrity support backfiring for Democrats MORE (Tenn.)

"It’s time for the House of Representatives to begin the impeachment process against President Trump. The President’s invitation to yet another foreign power—this time Ukraine—to undermine U.S. elections requires that Congress begin the process in our Constitution to levy formal charges against him," Cooper wrote on Twitter on Tuesday, Sept. 24. "This is a very serious step, but the President’s continuing misconduct requires that Congress uphold our Constitution and the laws of the land. No one, not even the President, is above the law."

 

Joe CourtneyJoseph (Joe) D. CourtneyHouse passes bill tackling workplace violence in health care, social services sectors This week: Round 2 of House impeachment inquiry hearings State dinner highlights the enduring importance of US-Australia alliance MORE (Conn.)

"We are at a critical moment for our nation, involving a ‘credible’ complaint concerning the actions of a sitting president happening in real-time. That is why I now believe it is time to elevate this process to a formal inquiry on the President and his potential misconduct, and to follow the facts wherever they may lead – which includes the most serious action the House can take under the Constitution: impeachment," Courtney said in a statement on Sept. 24.

 

TJ Cox (Calif.)

"An impeachment inquiry will allow us to break through the President’s stonewalling and obstruction and get the answers the American people deserve," Cox tweeted on Sept. 24.

 

Angie Craig (Minn.)

Craig, who represents a district Trump carried in 2016, also endorsed impeachment proceedings after Trump acknowledged discussing Biden with the Ukrainian leader. "It is clear that the sitting president of the United States placed his own personal interests above the national security of the United States. We must safeguard our electoral process and our very democracy from outside threats. For this reason, the current investigations into corruption must continue. And when there is an abuse of power of this magnitude, it is our responsibility to stand up for what is right. This is why I am calling to open impeachment proceedings — immediately, fairly, and impartially," Craig said in a statement on Sept. 23.

 

Charlie CristCharles (Charlie) Joseph CristRepublicans disavow GOP candidate who said 'we should hang' Omar The Hill's Morning Report — Trump's new controversy Florida Rep. Charlie Crist endorses Biden MORE (Fla.)

Crist called for an impeachment inquiry against Trump on Sept. 24. "“Today, I join the People of Florida’s 13th Congressional District in calling for the House to launch formal impeachment proceedings against President Trump," he said. "I do not reach this conclusion lightly. The urgency of accountability is laid bare by the President’s ongoing willingness to abuse the immense power of the Office of the United States President. Someone who believes there is nothing wrong with soliciting foreign interference in American elections – again – can cause unthinkable harm to our national security, our country, and our Constitution during the remaining 15 months of his term in office." 

 

Jason CrowJason CrowColorado rep planning sunrise run to possible sites for military memorial Bill introduced to give special immigrant visas to Kurds who helped US in Syria Congress set for showdown with Trump over Kurds MORE (Colo.)

"After reading Robert Mueller’s report, hearing his testimony, and responding to President Trump’s repeated stonewalling of Congress, it’s clear that our democracy faces substantial risks that require congressional action," Crow said in a Medium post on July 30. Crow also joined six other freshman House Democrats in writing an op-ed on Sept. 23 endorsing impeachment if the allegations that Trump pressed Ukraine's leader to investigate Biden are true.

 

Henry Cuellar (Texas)

"I agree with Speaker Pelosi that the respective committees in Congress must continue their investigations to see if these allegations are true before we proceed with impeachment. No one is above the law and if investigations prove that impeachment is the necessary course of action, then I will be forced to act on impeachment proceedings," Cuellar said in a statement on Sept. 26.

 

Elijah Cummings (D-Md.)

Cummings, the powerful chairman of the Oversight and Reform Committee, came out in favor of impeachment in a Sep. 24 statement. “When the history books are written about this tumultuous era, I want them to show that I was among those in the House of Representatives who stood up to lawlessness and tyranny," he wrote.

 

Sharice DavidsSharice DavidsWarren adds Ayanna Pressley as campaign co-chair Overnight Health Care: Democratic group to only endorse AG candidates who back abortion rights | Protect Our Care launches seven-figure ad buy to boost vulnerable Dems | California sues Juul Group launches seven-figure ad buy boosting vulnerable Democrats on drug prices MORE (Kan.)

"After careful deliberation, I am supporting the House of Representatives taking the first step in an impeachment process, beginning an impeachment inquiry," Davids said in a statement on Sept. 25.

 

Danny K. Davis (Ill.)

Davis announced on May 28 that he would sign on to Tlaib's resolution, saying that "I believe it is time" that the House begin an impeachment inquiry. "President Trump’s actions are challenging the very essence of our democracy," Davis said in a statement.

 

Susan DavisSusan Carol DavisOvernight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by USAA — House Dems subpoena Giuliani associates Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to testify on Libra | Extremists find home on Telegram app | Warren blasts Facebook for not removing anti-Biden ad | California outlaws facial recognition in police body cameras | China rips US tech sanctions MORE (Calif.)

“It is time to open an impeachment inquiry. To not move forward would make Congress complicit in the President's behavior," Davis said in a Sept. 23 statement. "The President admitted he made the call, leveraging the power of his office to get what he wanted from a head of State. The Director of National Intelligence has refused to send the whistleblower complaint to Congress as required by law."

 

Madeleine DeanMadeleine DeanImpeachment inquiry enters critical new phase Democrat unveils bill requiring banks to identify suspicious activity related to guns Democratic lawmakers call on Judiciary Committee to advance 'revenge porn' law MORE (Pa.)

Dean, a member of the Judiciary Committee, in an appearance on MSNBC's "Hardball," said she backed launching an impeachment inquiry.

 

 
"I believe that the time has come for the Judiciary Committee to open a formal impeachment inquiry and collect the evidence necessary to build a strong case against President Trump. His presidency is a danger to our national security and a threat to our democracy," DeFazio, the House Transportation Committee chairman, said in a statement on July 25 roughly 24 hours after Mueller's testimony before Congress.
 

Diana DeGetteDiana Louise DeGetteDemocrats request info on Google-Ascension partnership Trump health chief declines to detail ObamaCare replacement plan A dozen House Democrats call on EU ambassador to resign amid Ukraine scandal MORE (Colo.)

“The facts laid out in the Mueller report, coupled with this administration’s ongoing attempts to stonewall Congress, leave us no other choice: It is time for Congress to officially launch an impeachment inquiry against the President of the United States,” DeGette tweeted. She formally signed on to Tlaib's measure on May 23.

 

Rosa DeLauroRosa Luisa DeLauro'Medicare for All' backers notch win with high-profile hearing Republicans push back on expanding paid family leave beyond federal workers Overnight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — Deal on surprise medical bills faces obstacles | House GOP unveils rival drug pricing measure ahead of Pelosi vote | Justices to hear case over billions in ObamaCare payments MORE (Conn.)

"As with many of my colleagues, I have been reluctant to call for an impeachment inquiry because it would further divide the country, be perceived as overturning the 2016 election, and go to the United States Senate where Republicans would acquit President Trump regardless of the evidence," DeLauro, a close Pelosi ally, said Sept. 23. "An impeachment inquiry may be the only recourse Congress has if the president is enlisting foreign assistance in the 2020 election."

 

Suzan Delbene (Wash.)

“It gives me no pleasure to announce that I am calling for the House of Representatives to begin an impeachment inquiry into the President of the United States," Delbene said in a statement on July 28.

“The notion that a sitting President would attempt to derail an investigation of a direct attack on our democracy is shocking, unpatriotic, and a violation of the oath we share. The President has taken virtually no action to try to prevent Russia or other foreign powers from meddling in our free and fair elections in the future."

 

Antonio DelgadoAntonio Ramon DelgadoPowerful House panel to hold 'Medicare for All' hearing next week Overnight Health Care: Democratic group to only endorse AG candidates who back abortion rights | Protect Our Care launches seven-figure ad buy to boost vulnerable Dems | California sues Juul Group launches seven-figure ad buy boosting vulnerable Democrats on drug prices MORE (N.Y.)

Delgado released a statement on Sept. 24 saying that articles of impeachment were warranted hours after news broke that Trump allegedly held up aid to Ukraine before a controversial phone call with that country's leader in which he pressed for an investigation of former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter.

 

Val DemingsValdez (Val) Venita DemingsPelosi faces tough choices on impeachment managers Impeachment inquiry enters critical new phase Lawmakers turn attention to potential witnesses at Judiciary impeachment hearings MORE (Fla.)

Demings, a Judiciary Committee member, said last month after the Mueller report's release that “I think we have enough” to move forward with impeachment. “I think we have great evidence that the president has blatantly violated so many laws. It’s just ridiculous,” Demings said during a Democratic caucus conference call. 

 

Mark DeSaulnierMark James DeSaulnierDemocratic lawmaker laments Hunter Biden's business dealings in Ukraine House Democrat expects impeachment vote before 2020 Democratic congressman talks latest developments in impeachment inquiry MORE (Calif.)

"Congress must do its job, which includes overriding the DOJ policy that protects the president under any circumstance, and beginning an impeachment inquiry," DeSaulnier said in a statement after Mueller's May 29 appearance.

 

Ted DeutchTheodore (Ted) Eliot DeutchBipartisan lawmakers condemn Iran, dispute State Department on number of protesters killed Bipartisan lawmakers introduce amendment affirming US commitment to military aid to Israel Ethics sends memo to lawmakers on SCIF etiquette MORE (Fla.)

A spokesman for Deutch on Aug. 1 told The Hill that he would support an impeachment inquiry, though the congressman believes the House Judiciary Committee has already effectively started one with its investigation. "While he believes that there’s no need for a formal vote to open an inquiry and that we’ve been in one since the Committee started its investigation, he would support a vote to do so," the spokesman said. 

  

Debbie DingellDeborah (Debbie) Ann DingellProgressives hopeful for deal with Pelosi to avert showdown on drug prices Pro-trade group launches media buy as Trump and Democrats near deal on new NAFTA Pelosi gets standing ovation at Kennedy Center Honors MORE (Mich.)

"This country is divided. We cannot be divided on the rule of law. As an elected official my oath is to protect national security and the Constitution," Dingell, who co-leads House Democrats' messaging arm, said Sept. 23. "After recent revelations, I support an impeachment inquiry because we must follow the facts and hold the president accountable."

 

Lloyd DoggettLloyd Alton DoggettProgressive leader warns members could vote no on drug price bill as it stands White House talking new tax cuts with GOP On The Money: Lawmakers hammer Zuckerberg over Facebook controversies | GOP chair expects another funding stopgap | Senate rejects Dem measure on SALT deduction cap workarounds MORE (Texas)

Doggett's office confirmed to The Hill that he supports opening an impeachment inquiry. “What Mueller thought he could not do, Congress can no longer avoid," Doggett said in a statement.

 

Mike DoyleMichael (Mike) F. DoyleDemocrats demand FCC act over leak of phone location data Hillicon Valley: Google, Reddit to testify on tech industry protections | Trump joins Amazon-owned Twitch | House to vote on bill to combat foreign interference Reddit, Google to testify before House panel on tech's legal protections MORE (Pa.)

"Congress has the authority to subpoena any information necessary to carry out its oversight responsibilities. But the Administration refuses to comply with subpoenas and continues to prevent witnesses from testifying. I believe that it’s time to initiate an #Impeachment inquiry," Doyle tweeted on June 21.

 

Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelBombshell Afghanistan report bolsters calls for end to 'forever wars' House Democrats expected to unveil articles of impeachment Tuesday House approves two-state resolution in implicit rebuke of Trump MORE (N.Y.)

"The President abused the power of his office in an effort to stymie a legitimate investigation into his campaign’s involvement with Russia," Engel, chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, said in a statement on July 30. "The American people want, and deserve, the truth. I believe the House must pursue a formal impeachment inquiry." 

 

Veronica EscobarVeronica EscobarFive questions looming over impeachment Rep. Veronica Escobar elected to represent freshman class in House leadership Brindisi, Lamb recommended for Armed Services, Transportation Committees MORE (Texas)

“I personally feel like we cannot tolerate this level of obstruction, that if we do, then we have lowered the bar to the point where any criminal can be president of the United States and that should be unacceptable to all of us,” tweeted Escobar, a Judiciary Committee member. “I believe we need to begin an impeachment inquiry.”

 

Anna EshooAnna Georges EshooPowerful House panel to hold 'Medicare for All' hearing next week Democrats request info on Google-Ascension partnership Democrats demand FCC act over leak of phone location data MORE (Calif.)

"I fully support the Speaker’s announcement of a new impeachment inquiry. The circumstances surrounding the President’s phone call with a foreign leader requires it and we are obligated to go wherever the facts lead," Eshoo tweeted on Sept. 24.

 

Adriano EspaillatAdriano de Jesus Espaillat CabralDemocrats vow court victories won't slow impeachment timeline Overnight Defense: Protests at Trump's NYC Veterans Day speech | House Dems release Pentagon official's deposition transcript | Lawmakers ask Trump to rescind Erdogan invite Bipartisan House members call on Trump to rescind Erdoğan invitation MORE (N.Y.)

"We cannot slow down – the American people deserve the truth, and @realDonaldTrump deserves to be held accountable for his actions. #Impeach" Espaillat tweeted on May 29 after Mueller delivered his statement. Espaillat also previously co-sponsored articles of impeachment against Trump in 2017.

 

Dwight EvansDwight (Dewey) EvansOvernight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Buttigieg targets Warren, Sanders on health care ahead of debate | Judge overturns ObamaCare transgender protections | Poll sees support drop for 'Medicare for All' A dozen House Democrats call on EU ambassador to resign amid Ukraine scandal House Democrats blur lines on support for impeachment MORE (Pa.)

"The heavily redacted #MuellerReport reveals and details repeated disturbing conduct by the president, & it shouldn't go unnoticed — an impeachment vote would begin the process & allow House Judiciary to have broader investigative availability, which is certainly warranted!" Evans tweeted.

 

Abby FinkenauerAbby Lea FinkenauerSecond-tier Democrats face do-or-die phase Freshman Iowa lawmaker engaged to Warren staffer Iowa Democrat tops Ernst in third-quarter fundraising for Senate race MORE (Iowa)

“I have always supported Congress and our House committees in defending our democracy and Constitution. The impeachment inquiry requested today is needed to continue that work. It’s imperative we stand up for our country and hold those accountable who hurt our democracy," Finkenauer, who flipped a GOP-held district last fall, said Sept. 24.

 

Lizzie Fletcher (Texas)

"The facts we have learned recently are matters of utmost importance for our national security, country, and Constitution. The House should act swiftly to investigate and should be prepared to use the remedy exclusively in its power: impeachment," Fletcher, who flipped a GOP-held district in 2018, said in a statement Sept. 24.

 
 
 
Foster said in an interview with the Chicago Sun-Times on Aug. 27 that he supports an impeachment inquiry, citing Trump's desire to host the G-7 summit at his Doral Miami resort. “To my mind, looks to be a clear violation of the emoluments clause and the amount of money that’s at stake here seems non-trivial enough to quickly get the attention of Congress. And so there’s a long list of things here. Each one of which deserve, I believe, an inquiry into whether or not they should become an article of impeachment,” Foster said.
 
 
 
Frankel, a close ally of Pelosi, joined the growing calls for an impeachment inquiry on Sept. 24. "The latest allegations that the President pressured the President of Ukraine to investigate a political opponent and is blocking a whistleblower’s complaint detailing those actions, if true, represent a clear abuse of power and impeachable offense. The American people deserve the truth. I join all those calling for impeachment proceedings," Frankel said.

 

Marcia FudgeMarcia Louise FudgeBooker unveils legislation for federal bill to ban discrimination against natural hair Kamala Harris aide says in resignation letter: 'I have never seen an organization treat its staff so poorly' Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to testify on Libra | Extremists find home on Telegram app | Warren blasts Facebook for not removing anti-Biden ad | California outlaws facial recognition in police body cameras | China rips US tech sanctions MORE (Ohio)

Fudge signed on to Tlaib's resolution on June 6. She also co-sponsored articles of impeachment against Trump in 2017.

 

Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardGabbard knocks Trump over handling of Pensacola air station shooting Gabbard calls for congressional inquiry over Afghanistan war report The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by UANI — House Dems charge Trump with abuse, obstruction of Congress in impeachment articles MORE (Hawaii)

The presidential candidate came out for impeachment on Sept. 27.

“Up to this point, I have been opposed to pursuing impeachment because it will further divide our already badly divided country. However, after looking carefully at the transcript of the conversation with Ukraine’s President, the whistleblower complaint, the Inspector General memo, and President Trump’s comments about the issue, unfortunately, I believe that if we do not proceed with the inquiry, it will set a very dangerous precedent," Gabbard said. She added that the inquiry "cannot be turned into a long, protracted partisan circus that will further divide our country and undermine our democracy.”

 

Ruben GallegoRuben GallegoTrump officials defend use of fake university to lure foreign students ICE emerges as stumbling block in government funding talks Lawmakers press for ICE reforms after fake school report MORE (Ariz.)

"No president in the history of our country has ever been subject to as many credible allegations of illegal conduct as Donald Trump. Given the serious nature of these crimes, and the president's refusal to cooperate with congressional investigations, it's time for the House of Representatives to begin an impeachment inquiry," Gallego said in a House floor speech on July 11.

 

John GaramendiJohn Raymond GaramendiBombshell Afghanistan report bolsters calls for end to 'forever wars' Krystal Ball: New Biden ad is everything that's wrong with Democrats The Hill's Morning Report - Impeachment of Trump resumes MORE (Calif.) 

“The Mueller testimony is one further step in the process. The next step, in my opinion, is the undertaking of an impeachment inquiry, a formal process of inquiry following up on the Mueller testimony and other issues that have been brought to our attention. And then we will see where we go with an impeachment, a formal resolution. An impeachment inquiry is comparable to grand jury proceedings," Garamendi said in a statement after Mueller's July 24 testimony.
 

Jesús "Chuy" Garcia (Ill.)

“After careful consideration and deliberation, I’ve come to the conclusion that the House of Representatives must execute its constitutionally mandated responsibility and begin a formal inquiry,” Garcia told WBEZ in an interview on May 28.

 

Sylvia GarciaSylvia GarciaHillicon Valley: Senators ask Trump to halt Huawei licenses | Warren criticizes Zuckerberg over secret dinner with Trump | Senior DHS cyber official to leave | Dems offer bill on Libra oversight On The Money: Trump signs short-term spending bill to avoid shutdown | Pelosi casts doubt on USMCA deal in 2019 | California high court strikes down law targeting Trump tax returns Lawmakers introduce bill to 'protect' consumers from Facebook's digital currency MORE (Texas)

"Let's be clear. I've never said I'm not for the inquiry. I've not made a decision whether to impeach or not," Garcia told CNN on Sept. 25. "I've been for the impeachment inquiry that we've been doing in Judiciary since before the summer break."

 

Jimmy GomezJimmy GomezHouse Democrats offer bill to expand the estate tax House Democrats blur lines on support for impeachment Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment MORE (Calif.)

"We will NOT stand idly by as this administration runs roughshod over the Constitution. I have voted TWICE to start debate on articles of impeachment. And I would do it again in a heartbeat," Gomez tweeted after Mueller's statement.

 

Vicente Gonzalez (Texas)
 
“It is my duty as a patriot and as a member of Congress to defend the Constitution, and that is why today I must support the formal impeachment inquiry,” Gonzalez said Sept. 25. 

 

Josh GottheimerJoshua (Josh) GottheimerGroup of Democrats floating censure of Trump instead of impeachment: report Bipartisan lawmakers introduce amendment affirming US commitment to military aid to Israel Progressive group unveils first slate of 2020 congressional endorsements MORE (N.J.)

"The serious allegations that have surfaced about communication between President Trump and the Ukrainian President put our national security at risk and merit an immediate inquiry. We must let the facts guide our work," Gottheimer tweeted on Sept. 24.

 

Al Green (Texas)

Green has been a vocal supporter of impeachment since 2017. He forced two House floor votes on impeachment in 2017 and 2018 while Republicans held the majority and has threatened to force a third.

 

Raúl Grijalva (Ariz.)

"President Trump is not exonerated, and his administration is deliberately misleading the American people about the findings of the Special Counsel. If this isn’t a reason for an #ImpeachmentInquiryNow, I don’t know what is," Grijalva, the Natural Resources Committee chairman, tweeted hours after Mueller's statement.

 

Deb HaalandDebra HaalandWarren bill would revoke Medals of Honor for Wounded Knee massacre Warren adds Ayanna Pressley as campaign co-chair Progressive freshmen jump into leadership PAC fundraising MORE (N.M.)

"There is growing evidence of impeachable offenses and I believe we have a responsibility to defend our Constitution and our Democracy. We must move forward with an impeachment inquiry. The President is not above the law," Haaland said in a statement Aug. 14.

 

Josh Harder (Calif.)

Harder joined the swelling ranks of Democrats calling for an inquiry on Sept. 24. "Last week, we found out that the president himself may have put our national security at risk, invited another foreign government to interfere in our election, and used American tax dollars to further his own political agenda," he said in a statement. “Anyone willing to sacrifice the national security interests of the United States for their own benefit is unfit to be president. If these allegations are true, it’s time for the House to open impeachment proceedings."

 

Alcee HastingsAlcee (Judge) Lamar HastingsDemocrat unveils bill requiring banks to identify suspicious activity related to guns Ethics panel investigating Rep. Hastings over relationship with staffer The 13 House Democrats who back Kavanaugh's impeachment MORE (Fla.)

“This continued insistence on undermining our democracy must be met with the full force and strength possessed by the United States Congress as set forth by our founding fathers in the Constitution, up to and including, Articles of Impeachment," Hastings said in a statement on Sept. 24.

 

Jahana HayesJahana HayesIlhan Omar, Ayanna Pressley dance to Lizzo's 'Truth Hurts' in video Democratic rep slams news outlets for 'exaggerated headlines' about threats Lawmakers put spotlight on youth homelessness MORE (Conn.)

"Despite what the whistleblower complaint may or may not reveal, the president’s obstruction of Congress in carrying out our constitutional oversight duty is concerning," Hayes said in a statement on Sept. 24. “The actions of this President lead me to no other conclusion than to support formal impeachment proceedings.”

 

Denny HeckDennis (Denny) Lynn HeckExclusive: Guccifer 2.0 hacked memos expand on Pennsylvania House races Heck enjoys second political wind Incoming lawmaker feeling a bit overwhelmed MORE (Wash.)

"There is no question that the President encouraged, welcomed and benefited from the interference of a foreign adversary in our 2016 election. Furthermore, he has both refused to fully acknowledge it occurred and even suggested he might welcome such interference again," Heck said in a statement on July 28, days after special counsel Robert Mueller testified before the House Intelligence panel, of which he's a member. “The President has also engaged in an aggressive and active cover-up of the effort to reveal all the facts. 

“Accordingly, I support initiation of an impeachment inquiry by the House Judiciary Committee and will support measures to accomplish this when Congress returns to Washington, D.C.”

 

Brian HigginsBrian Higgins'Medicare for All' backers notch win with high-profile hearing Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment On The Money: Sanders unveils plan to wipe .6T in student debt | How Sanders plan plays in rivalry with Warren | Treasury watchdog to probe delay of Harriet Tubman bills | Trump says Fed 'blew it' on rate decision MORE (N.Y.)

Higgins mentioned the defiance of subpoenas by government employees in backing an impeachment inquiry.

“Beyond the verified instances of obstruction detailed by the Special Counsel, over the past several months, the President has stonewalled every Congressional request and forbid government employees from complying with congressional subpoenas," he said in a June 19 statement. "These actions further seek to obstruct the transparent and lawful government Americans deserve, representing a deliberate irreverence for the Constitution that forces the House to exercise its impeachment responsibility as set forth in Article 1.”

Katie HillKatherine (Katie) Lauren HillKatie Hill pens op-ed about Congress resignation, toxic marriage, mental health and resilience Young Turks founder: Past remarks on women were attempt 'to be a stupid, politically incorrect Republican' Feinstein endorses Christy Smith for Katie Hill's former House seat MORE (Calif.)

Hill, who flipped a GOP-held district that Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump trade deal likely to sow division in Democratic presidential field Trump supporters at Pa. rally 'upset' after Democrats introduce impeachment articles Hillary Clinton documentary to premiere at Sundance MORE carried in 2016, said she would vote in favor of impeaching Trump if the allegations about pressuring the Ukrainian government to investigate Biden are corroborated. "I strongly support the House of Representatives moving forward with impeachment proceedings ‚ it is what the Constitution, my constituents, and my conscience demands. If Congress confirms reports of egregious misconduct that threaten the security of our country or undermine faith in our democracy, I will vote to impeach the president."

 

Jim HimesJames (Jim) Andres HimesPelosi faces tough choices on impeachment managers This week: Impeachment inquiry moves to Judiciary Committee Juan Williams: Trump has nothing left but smears MORE (Conn.) 

“The time has come for the House of Representatives to begin an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. From the moment of his inauguration, this President has shown contempt for the truth, has attacked our institutions, and has ignored the Constitution he swore to defend," Himes, a member of the Intelligence Committee, said in a statement on June 24. At the same time, Himes made sure to praise Pelosi: "My motive today is not to pressure the Speaker of the House, whose leadership in this Congress has been superb."

 

Steven HorsfordSteven Alexander HorsfordProgressive freshmen jump into leadership PAC fundraising Mass shootings have hit 158 House districts so far this year Pelosi announces launch of formal impeachment inquiry into Trump MORE (Nev.)

Horsford, in a joint statement with fellow Nevada Democratic Rep. Susie LeeSuzanne (Susie) Kelley LeeMORE, said that the allegations that Trump pressured the Ukrainian leader to investigate Biden would warrant impeachment. "If these allegations are true, as the President has admitted, he threatened our national security and abused hundreds of millions of American taxpayer dollars," they said in a Sept. 24 statement. “By law, the Administration is required to turn over the whistleblower report to Congress. If the President interferes, Congress has the constitutional duty to begin impeachment proceedings and we will exercise our solemn responsibility as Members of Congress to support those proceedings."

 

Chrissy Houlahan (Pa.)

“If the allegations are found to be true, or if the Administration continues to refuse to comply with reasonable Congressional requests for information, I will take the grave step of calling for a formal authorization of an impeachment investigation. This investigation should look into the President's obstruction so that we can get to the bottom of what happened and have transparency for the American people. If the investigation discovers that these reports are true, we should then consider articles of impeachment on the House floor," Houlahan said in a statement on Sept. 23 in light of the Ukraine allegations.

 

Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by UANI — House Dems charge Trump with abuse, obstruction of Congress in impeachment articles Hoyer predicts impeachment vote next week Pelosi announces support for new Trump NAFTA deal MORE (Md.)

The majority leader echoed Pelosi on Sept. 24 in officially expressing support for an impeachment inquiry. “I fully support Congress moving forward with an official impeachment inquiry. I have grave concerns about the President’s troubling admission that he sought Ukrainian interference in the 2020 election, undermining America’s national security," Hoyer said. “As the relevant committees continue their investigations under the umbrella of the impeachment inquiry, we will continue to pursue the facts and follow them wherever they lead - including to articles of impeachment." 

 

Jared HuffmanJared William HuffmanDemocrats reach cusp of impeachment Democrats gear up for high-stakes Judiciary hearing Pelosi heading to Madrid for UN climate change convention MORE (Calif.)

“The Constitution created our impeachment authority for exactly this kind of circumstance. And it's really damaging to the country and to our institutions if we punt on something like this,” Huffman told "PBS NewsHour" after the Mueller report became public. Huffman is a co-sponsor of Tlaib’s resolution.

 

Sheila Jackson LeeSheila Jackson LeeOvernight Defense: Trump leaves door open to possible troop increase in Middle East | Putin offers immediate extension of key nuclear treaty Lawmakers to watch during Wednesday's impeachment hearing Lawmakers honor JFK on 56th anniversary of his death MORE (Texas)

Jackson Lee, a Judiciary Committee member, introduced a resolution in May that would authorize the panel to "investigate whether sufficient grounds exist" for moving forward with impeachment. She also voted in favor of Green's impeachment resolution on July 17.

 

Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalPelosi reaches deal with progressives to avert showdown over drug price bill Overnight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — Progressives hope to avoid drug-pricing showdown with Pelosi | 'Medicare for All' backers get high-profile hearing | Dems take victory lap after eliminating drug protections in trade deal Progressives hopeful for deal with Pelosi to avert showdown on drug prices MORE (Wash.)

“We are now at the point where we must begin an impeachment inquiry. I don't say that lightly. We've taken every step we can w/subpoenas and witnesses,” tweeted Jayapal, a Judiciary Committee member and Progressive Caucus leader.

 

Hakeem Jeffies (N.Y.)

The House Democratic caucus chairman tweeted on Sept. 24 that "the Constitution gives Congress the responsibility to rein in a lawless President. We will do our job #ImpeachmentInvestigation."

 

Eddie Bernice JohnsonEddie Bernice JohnsonPelosi heading to Madrid for UN climate change convention What has EPA been hiding about formaldehyde? Overnight Energy: House Science Committee hits EPA with subpoenas | California sues EPA over Trump revoking emissions waiver | Interior disbands board that floated privatization at national parks MORE (Texas)

Johnson, who chairs the House Science, Space and Technology Committee, said that she would endorse impeachment proceedings if the Trump administration doesn't turn over documents related to the intelligence community whistleblower complaint. “If the decision is made by the President and his Administration to withhold this information from Congress, or if the allegations of his abuse of power are substantiated, I will be placed in a position where I must fulfill my constitutional duty and support impeachment proceedings," Johnson said in a Sept. 24 statement.

 

Hank JohnsonHenry (Hank) C. JohnsonBlack lawmakers condemn Trump's 'lynching' remarks Maloney to serve as acting Oversight chairwoman after Cummings's death The 13 House Democrats who back Kavanaugh's impeachment MORE (Ga.)

Johnson, a member of the Judiciary Committee, told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Sept. 24 that Trump's admission that he pressed Ukraine's president to investigate Biden and his family "crosses a red line." “President Trump’s repeated obstruction and flagrant disregard of his oath of office demands the issuance of Articles of Impeachment,” Johnson said.

 

Marcy KapturMarcia (Marcy) Carolyn KapturAppropriators face crucial weekend to reach deal Congress races to beat deadline on shutdown Overnight Defense: Trump clashes with Macron at NATO summit | House impeachment report says Trump abused power | Top Dem scolds military leaders on Trump intervention in war crimes cases MORE (Ohio)

Kaptur expressed support for the Judiciary Committee's vote to formalize procedures for its impeachment investigation. "I support the House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerGOP calls for minority hearing on impeachment, threatens procedural measures READ: Articles of impeachment against Trump Trump, White House rip Democrats over impeachment articles MORE and the Judiciary Committee’s decision to define the scope of their oversight investigation and set the parameters of a formal impeachment inquiry. I look forward to thoroughly examining any conclusions reached by the committee," Kaptur said Sept. 12.

 

Bill KeatingWilliam (Bill) Richard KeatingLawmakers spar over surveillance flight treaty with Russia Overnight Defense: Protests at Trump's NYC Veterans Day speech | House Dems release Pentagon official's deposition transcript | Lawmakers ask Trump to rescind Erdogan invite Bipartisan House members call on Trump to rescind Erdoğan invitation MORE (Mass.)

"The Mueller report reveals several instances of obstruction of justice, certainly enough to move forward with an impeachment investigation," Keating wrote in a series of tweets on Aug. 22.

 

Robin KellyRobin Lynne KellyHillicon Valley: FCC moves against Huawei, ZTE | Dem groups ask Google to reconsider ads policy | Bill introduced to increase data access during probes Dems call out Oracle for lack of diversity on its board Overnight Health Care: GOP senator says drug price action unlikely this year | House panel weighs ban on flavored e-cigs | New York sues Juul MORE (Ill.)

Kelly said she supports opening an "impeachment investigation" but acknowledged that it's unlikely Trump will actually be impeached. “The publication of the Mueller report has only strengthened my resolve and proved that the President obstructed justice. I support efforts to open an impeachment investigation but I know we don’t have the votes in the GOP-controlled Senate. We need to keep investigating, keep showing the facts to the American people and ‘impeach’ him at the ballot box in 2020," Kelly said, according to WBEZ.

 

Joe KennedyJoseph (Joe) Patrick KennedyOvernight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — Deal on surprise medical bills faces obstacles | House GOP unveils rival drug pricing measure ahead of Pelosi vote | Justices to hear case over billions in ObamaCare payments Trump escalates fight over tax on tech giants Sanders's Massachusetts state director 'moves on' from campaign MORE (Mass.)

"It's a dark day for our country when its Commander-in-Chief is accused of high crimes. But after reading the Mueller report in full, reviewing the facts and consulting with legal experts, I believe Congress has a responsibility to act decisively," Kennedy said in a statement on June 28.

 

Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaBombshell Afghanistan report bolsters calls for end to 'forever wars' Armed Services chair calls defense bill 'most progressive in the history of the country' after criticism Lawmakers release defense bill with parental leave-for-Space Force deal MORE (Calif.)

"I support the impeachment inquiry," Khanna told MSNBC on Aug. 13. "Now we're in an inquiry and I support [Nadler] on that."

 

Dan KildeeDaniel (Dan) Timothy KildeeOvernight Energy: Dems unveil first bill toward goal of net-zero emissions by 2050 | Oversight panel asks EPA for plans on 'forever chemicals' | EPA finalizes rule easing chemical plant safety regulations Oversight Democrats ask EPA to turn over plans for regulating toxic 'forever chemicals' Mark Ruffalo's environmental drama 'Dark Waters' gets DC premiere MORE (Mich.)

Kildee, a chief deputy whip, came out in favor of an impeachment inquiry after Trump told ABC News he'd accept dirt on political rivals from foreign entities.

"[T]he president's actions have taken us to a moment where I believe Congress must open an impeachment inquiry to defend the rule of law," Kildee said in a statement. "And the President's recent comments welcoming and encouraging foreign interference in our elections were absolutely chilling. The President's statements are not only unpatriotic, they are illegal."

 

Derek KilmerDerek Christian KilmerHouse extends Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress for another year Progressive freshmen jump into leadership PAC fundraising Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to testify on Libra | Extremists find home on Telegram app | Warren blasts Facebook for not removing anti-Biden ad | California outlaws facial recognition in police body cameras | China rips US tech sanctions MORE (Wash.)

"The incidents of obstruction of justice cited in the Mueller report are too serious to be dismissed based on politics, party biases, or the fear of a predicted outcome," Kilmer tweeted on July 28. "I support the House of Representatives beginning an impeachment inquiry into President Trump."

 

Andy Kim (N.J.) 

"By urging the Ukrainian government to take action to influence our Democracy, Trump has violated that power and the trust of the American people. If the facts are corroborated, that violation, and my understanding of its implications, has led me to come to the conclusion that the President has committed an impeachable offense," he said in a statement on Sept. 24.

 

Ann KirkpatrickAnn KirkpatrickAdam Schiff's star rises with impeachment hearings Swing-seat Democrats oppose impeachment, handing Pelosi leverage McSally gets new primary challenger MORE (Ariz.)

Kirkpatrick, a GOP target in 2020, said on July 16 that she decided to support an impeachment inquiry after speaking with constituents and legal scholars, reading the Mueller report, and watching Trump administration officials defy subpoenas. "I know impeachment is risky, but allowing this president to defy the law is even more risky," Kirkpatrick said in a House floor speech.

 

Raja KrishnamoorthiSubramanian (Raja) Raja KrishnamoorthiOvernight Health Care — Presented by Johnson & Johnson — Virginia moves to suspend Medicaid work rules | Powerful House panel sets 'Medicare for All' hearing | Hospitals sue over Trump price rule | FDA official grilled on vaping policy FDA official dodges question on future of Trump administration's vaping flavors ban Oversight Subcommittee to question FDA tobacco director over status of Trump's vaping ban MORE (Ill.)

“I come to this conclusion with a heavy heart, and it is not a conclusion I relish or desire, but if the 'rule of law' is to have any meaning in this country, it is the only appropriate course of action,” he said in a statement.

 

Annie Kuster (N.H.)

"The Special Counsel reiterated that he did not exonerate the President, and that because of Department of Justice Policy, he could not charge the President with a crime even if he had the evidence to do so," Kuster said in a statement two days after Mueller's July 24 testimony. "Given the Special Counsel's testimony, and the evidence outlined in his report, I support the House of Representatives opening a formal inquiry."

 

Conor Lamb (Pa.)

"Congress must continue our work to get the truth. I fully support the House Intelligence Committee's inquiry, and I believe that at each step of the way we must follow the evidence where it leads," Lamb tweeted on Sept. 27.

 

Jim LangevinJames (Jim) R. LangevinHillicon Valley: Commerce extends Huawei waiver | Senate Dems unveil privacy bill priorities | House funding measure extends surveillance program | Trump to tour Apple factory | GOP bill would restrict US data going to China Trump makes social media a player in impeachment Bill introduced to give special immigrant visas to Kurds who helped US in Syria MORE (R.I.)

"After careful reflection & interaction with my constituents, I believe we must move forward with an impeachment inquiry in President Trump’s actions. The American people deserve the full truth, and they deserve a President who respects the rule of law," Langevin tweeted on Aug. 21.

 

Rick LarsenRichard (Rick) Ray LarsenAviation chairmen cite safety, new tech among concerns for the future The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Better Medicare Alliance - Diplomat's 'powerful' testimony and 'lynching' attract headlines The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Better Medicare Alliance - Trump's impeachment plea to Republicans MORE (Wash.)

Larsen said in a statement on July 18, a day after Trump's rally where the crowd chanted "send her back" in reference to a freshman congresswoman, that the president's statement "degrading the dream of citizenship" led him to endorse impeachment. "The president has no concept of this widely and tightly held belief of Americans. His comments do not protect the concept of U.S. citizenship. They undermine it. He should not be the president of the United States." Larsen also voted in favor of Green's impeachment resolution on July 17.


John Larson John Barry Larson Retirees should say 'no thanks' to Romney's Social Security plan The Hill's 12:30 Report: All eyes on Pelosi as calls for impeachment grow More Democrats threaten impeachment over Trump's dealings with Ukraine MORE (Conn.)

Larson, a former Democratic Caucus chairman, said Sept. 23 that he would endorse impeachment if the acting director of national intelligence refuses to turn over the whistleblower complaint to Congress by a Sept. 26 hearing with the House Intelligence Committee. "If the Director refuses to comply at Thursday’s hearing, the Trump Administration has left Congress with no alternative but for the House to begin impeachment proceedings, which I will support," Larson said.

 

Brenda LawrenceBrenda Lulenar LawrenceHouse Democrat walks back remark favoring censure over impeachment Jane Fonda calls for protecting water resources at weekly DC climate protest DCCC adds senior staffers after summer departures MORE (Mich.)

Lawrence cited Trump's efforts to stonewall congressional investigations and Mueller's findings on Trump attempting the undermine the special counsel probe, as well as the president indicating in an ABC News interview that he'd accept dirt from a foreign entity on a political opponent. "That coupled with his recent admission during a network interview that he sees nothing wrong with accepting assistance from a foreign entity, leaves me no choice but to now request that this body proceed with the process of conducting an impeachment inquiry," Lawrence said on June 18, according to the Detroit News.

 

Al LawsonAlfred (Al) James LawsonFlorida Rep. Charlie Crist endorses Biden Warren introduces bill targeted at food insecurity on college campuses Harris hops past Biden in early race for Black Caucus support MORE (Fla.)

"I support a formal impeachment inquiry of President Trump. His recent admission that engaged in unlawful conversations with Ukrainian officials is not only embarrassing, but undermines the integrity of our elections, the dignity of the office and threatens our national security," Lawson said in a statement on Sept. 25.

 

Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeBooker unveils legislation for federal bill to ban discrimination against natural hair Adam Schiff's star rises with impeachment hearings Lawmakers visit African migrants at US-Mexico border MORE (Calif.)

The California progressive, who is a member of the Democratic leadership team, co-sponsored Tlaib's measure on May 23.

 

Susie Lee (Nev.)

Lee, in a joint statement with fellow Nevada Democratic Rep. Steven Horsford, said that the allegations that Trump pressured the Ukrainian leader to investigate Biden would warrant impeachment. "If these allegations are true, as the President has admitted, he threatened our national security and abused hundreds of millions of American taxpayer dollars," they said in a Sept. 24 statement. “By law, the Administration is required to turn over the whistleblower report to Congress. If the President interferes, Congress has the constitutional duty to begin impeachment proceedings and we will exercise our solemn responsibility as Members of Congress to support those proceedings."

 

Andy LevinAndrew (Andy) LevinDemocrats work to bring labor on board trade deal House Democrats rebuke State Department for 'reversal' on Israeli settlements The Hill's Morning Report - Tempers boil over at the White House MORE (Mich.)

Levin tweeted on June 15 that “I have watched the Trump administration’s stonewalling of our oversight activities with growing frustration.”

“I have concluded that, absent an impeachment inquiry, even if our appeals to the courts continue to succeed, they will follow a timeline far too slow to meet the needs of the American people for truth and justice,” Levin wrote.

 

Mike Levin (Calif.)

Levin, who represents a swing district in California, tweeted on July 26 that he "can't ignore the corruption and obstruction we witness every day from President Trump." 

"I now support an impeachment inquiry in order to get the truth for my constituents," he added.

 

John LewisJohn LewisIsakson talks up bipartisanship in Senate farewell speech Trump tax breaks for low-income neighborhoods draw scrutiny Democrats ramp up oversight efforts over 'opportunity zone' incentive MORE (Ga.)

Lewis, the civil rights icon, called for impeachment proceedings in a fiery House floor speech on Sept. 24. "We cannot delay. We must not wait. Now is the time to act. I have been patient while we try every other path to use every other tool," Lewis said. "I truly believe the time to begin impeachment proceedings against this president has come. To delay or to do otherwise would betray the foundation of our democracy."

 

Ted LieuTed W. LieuVideo of Princess Anne shrugging as Queen greets Trump goes viral Lawmakers to watch during Wednesday's impeachment hearing Adam Schiff's star rises with impeachment hearings MORE (Calif.)

Lieu echoed other fellow Judiciary Committee members in endorsing an inquiry. “This inquiry could lead to impeachment, or it could lead to nothing. But I think if McGahn doesn’t show, we have to at least start it,” Lieu told The Washington Post.

 

Dan Lipinski (Ill.)

Lipinski said that the allegations that Trump pressured Ukraine's president to investigate Biden while withholding military aid would merit impeachment. "If President Trump conducted a quid pro quo such as this it would be an impeachable offense. The whistleblower complaint deserves a full investigation," Lipinski said, according to the Chicago Sun-Times on Sept. 24.

 

Dave LoebsackDavid (Dave) Wayne LoebsackHouse committee advances legislation to improve broadband mapping Overnight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Buttigieg targets Warren, Sanders on health care ahead of debate | Judge overturns ObamaCare transgender protections | Poll sees support drop for 'Medicare for All' Genetic counselors save health care dollars when involved in the testing process MORE (Iowa)

“I have felt the need to proceed judiciously given the high constitutional requirements of impeachment, but President Trump’s actions and obstruction require this step of establishing an impeachment inquiry," Loebsack said Sept. 24.

 

Zoe LofgrenZoe Ellen LofgrenHow we compromised to help America's farms Democrats express confidence in case as impeachment speeds forward Sunday shows — Nadler: A jury would convict Trump in 'three minutes flat' MORE (Calif.)

"A formal impeachment inquiry should be undertaken in the House of Representatives. The President has now admitted that he asked the President of Ukraine to take actions to help his re-election. That conduct alone violates his obligations under the Constitution," Lofgren, a senior member of the Judiciary Committee, said Sept. 24.

 

Alan LowenthalAlan Stuart LowenthalHouse moves ahead on long-stalled resolution supporting two states for Israelis and Palestinians This week: Impeachment inquiry moves to Judiciary Committee Pelosi calls for Congress to pass resolution supporting two-state solution to Israeli-Palestinian conflict MORE (Calif.)

"Congress must hold [Trump] accountable. I believe the time has come to consider an impeachment inquiry," Lowenthal tweeted a day after Mueller's statement.

 

Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyOn The Money: Pelosi, Trump tout deal on new NAFTA | McConnell says no trade vote until impeachment trial wraps up | Lawmakers push spending deadline to Thursday Lawmakers push spending deadline to Thursday Little progress as spending talks push past weekend MORE (N.Y.)

The House Appropriations Committee chairwoman came out in support of an impeachment inquiry on July 31, nearly two weeks after she voted with 94 fellow Democrats to go forward with an effort to impeach Trump.

“Since he took office, House Democrats have been aggressively and thoughtfully investigating potentially illegal activity by the President and others on his campaign and in his administration. The administration has done all it can to withhold information, leading to various legal efforts to secure testimony and evidence," she wrote in a statement.

 

Ben Ray Luján (N.M.)
 
"I support moving forward with an impeachment inquiry, which will continue to uncover the facts for the American people and hold this president accountable," Luján, the fourth-ranking House Democrat, said in a statement on Aug. 19.
 
 
 
Luria, a freshman who represents a district Trump carried in 2016, called on the House to move forward with impeachment in a statement on Sept. 23 in light of the allegations that the president pressured Ukraine's leader to investigate Biden. "Allegations of this gross misconduct meet the threshold of high crimes and misdemeanors set by the Constitution. Congress must investigate and use the full extent of its powers to check these alleged abuses of presidential power. The House must move forward with impeachment," Luria said.
 
 
 
"President Trump’s actions, currently undisputed, are an attack on our Democracy, national security and rule of law, and warrant the commencement of formal impeachment proceedings," Lynch tweeted on Sept. 24.
 

Tom MalinowskiThomas (Tom) MalinowskiDemocrats reach cusp of impeachment Pelosi's whiplash moment brings praise and criticism Democrats gear up for high-stakes Judiciary hearing MORE (N.J.)

Malinowski, who represents a competitive swing district, told NBC News that he now supports an impeachment inquiry. "I’ve come to think that it is warranted at this point given what appears to be across-the-board defiance of congressional oversight and the rule of law by the administration," he said. 

 

Carolyn MaloneyCarolyn Bosher MaloneyRepublicans push back on expanding paid family leave beyond federal workers Top Republican requests House hearing with DOJ inspector general Watchdog report finds FBI not motivated by political bias in Trump probe MORE (N.Y.)

“I’ve been thinking about impeachment for a long time. It is not something that Congress, or our country, can undertake lightly - it’s a terrible, weighty thing," Maloney said at a rally on June 15. “After carefully reviewing evidence laid out in the Mueller Report, after attending numerous hearings, after listening to the concerns of my constituents, and after doing as much soul-searching as I’ve ever done in my life - it is my inescapable conclusion that the House of Representatives must open an impeachment inquiry against the President of the United States."

 

Sean Patrick Maloney (N.Y.)

"Unless [the House Intelligence Committee] immediately receives both the whistleblower complaint and the recordings of any calls - and they dispel these allegations - I’m prepared to support an impeachment inquiry,"  Maloney, a member of the Intelligence panel, said on Sept. 24.

 

 
A spokesman confirmed to The Hill that Matsui supports launching an impeachment inquiry. Matsui had voted in favor of Green's impeachment resolution on July 17.
 
Ben McAdams (Utah)
McAdams, a freshman in a competitive district, said Oct. 4 that "we find ourselves today at the point that an inquiry is necessary to get all of the facts on the table," according to the Salt Lake Tribune. "The president’s refusal to further cooperate with congressional oversight, without an impeachment inquiry, is regrettable."
  
 
 
McBath, a Judiciary Committee member who represents a swing district, said in a message to supporters on Sept. 25 that she supports the panel’s impeachment inquiry. “Our president is not above the law, and House Democrats and I will continue the impeachment inquiry we voted to start almost two weeks ago,” McBath said, referring to the committee vote to formalize procedures for impeachment-related hearings.
 
 

"I fully expect the responsible House committees to expedite their investigations and, as soon as possible, formally draft articles of impeachment. It is my belief that the House of Representatives has an absolute obligation under the Constitution to hold a president accountable for illegal conduct, and that includes Mr. Trump," McCollum said in a statement after Mueller delivered his public statement on May 29.

 

Donald McEachinAston (Donale) Donald McEachinDemocrats unveil first bill toward goal of net-zero emissions by 2050 Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to testify on Libra | Extremists find home on Telegram app | Warren blasts Facebook for not removing anti-Biden ad | California outlaws facial recognition in police body cameras | China rips US tech sanctions House Democrats introduce new legislation to combat foreign election interference MORE (Va.)

“It is clear that the sitting president of the United States has repeatedly violated the law and damaged our democracy," he said in a statement on Sept. 24. "Recent reports, if true, about his conversation with the president of Ukraine, demonstrate that he continues to place self-interest ahead of national interests, putting his desire to win re-election above our rule of law and national security. To look the other way is an abrogation of my oath, my duty, and my responsibility.”

 

Jim McGovern (Mass.)

McGovern, the chairman of the powerful House Rules Committee, endorsed impeachment after Mueller’s comments. “We’re beyond talking about this in terms of political implications. We have to do what’s right,” McGovern told WGBH. McGovern previously voted in favor of articles of impeachment offered by Green during the last Congress. He now chairs the committee closely aligned with leadership that controls how legislation is considered on the House floor. 

 

Jerry McNerneyGerlad (Jerry) Mark McNerneyDemocrats demand FCC act over leak of phone location data Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Lawmakers grow impatient for FDA cannabis rules MORE (Calif.)

"To fulfill our sworn duty, Congress must move forward with an impeachment inquiry. Brazen lies have been a hallmark of this presidency and it is now time for a reckoning," McNerney tweeted on Sept. 24.

 

Gregory MeeksGregory Weldon MeeksOn The Money: House passes monthlong stopgap | Broader spending talks stall | Judge orders Democrats to give notice if they request Trump's NY tax returns | Progressives ramp up attacks on private equity Progressive Democrats ramp up attacks on private equity CNN: Biden likened Clinton impeachment to 'partisan lynching' in 1998 MORE (N.Y.)

Meeks told CNN on Sept. 24 that he now supports an impeachment inquiry in light of the intelligence community whistleblower allegations. “I think that the line has been crossed,” Meeks said. "The only course of action is to go into an impeachment inquiry."

 

Grace MengGrace MengHillicon Valley: Progressives oppose funding bill over surveillance authority | Senators call for 5G security coordinator | Facebook gets questions over location tracking | Louisiana hit by ransomware attack Progressives oppose spending stopgap measure over surveillance authority extension Hillicon Valley: Ocasio-Cortez clashes with former Dem senator over gig worker bill | Software engineer indicted over Capital One breach | Lawmakers push Amazon to remove unsafe products MORE (N.Y.)

Meng, vice chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, voiced support for launching an impeachment inquiry on July 30, nearly two weeks after she voted with 94 fellow Democrats to go forward with an effort to impeach Trump. Meng had joined Green and 93 Democrats to accuse Trump of inflaming racial tensions following a recent episode in which he urged four female lawmakers of color to “go back” to other countries.

"In this regard, I believe it is my duty to seek out truth for the sake of my constituents and our nation, and thereby call for an impeachment inquiry," she said.

 

Gwen MooreGwen Sophia MooreA dozen House Democrats call on EU ambassador to resign amid Ukraine scandal The 13 House Democrats who back Kavanaugh's impeachment On The Money: Senate panel scraps vote on key spending bill amid standoff | Democrats threaten to vote against defense bill over wall funding | Trump set to meet with aides about reducing capital gains taxes MORE (Wis.)

"President Trump has repeatedly demonstrated manifest disrespect for the office he holds, Congress, and the American people," Moore said, according to The Associated Press. "I have long said that Trump should resign. Impeachment is not something that any of us take lightly, but we cannot shrink from our responsibilities either."

 

Joe MorelleJoseph (Joe) MorelleDemocrats divided on surprise medical bill fix House panel delays vote on surprise medical bills legislation Push on 'surprise' medical bills hits new roadblocks MORE (N.Y.)

“The President’s disturbing pattern of unlawful behavior is an offense to the very principles and ideals our nation was founded upon and clearly demonstrates that he believes the laws of the United States do not apply to him. Therefore, I believe it is in the national interest that the United States House of Representatives moves forward with impeachment proceedings," Morelle said on Sept. 24.

 
 

The presidential candidate backs an impeachment investigation. “I'm not calling for a vote on impeachment today. We don't have all the facts yet. But we should be getting those facts and making them transparent for the American people,” Moulton told MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell.

 

Debbie Mucarsel-PowellDebbie Mucarsel-PowellLawmakers to watch during Wednesday's impeachment hearing Democrats set to open new chapter in impeachment Congress extends flood insurance program for 14th time since 2017 MORE (Fla.)

Mucarsel-Powell is both a freshman who flipped a swing district last fall and a Judiciary Committee member. "This President has engaged in behavior that we have not seen, nor would we have allowed, from the other 44 men who have occupied that office. This is why I support opening an impeachment inquiry into the President," she said in a statement on June 21.

 

Stephanie MurphyStephanie MurphyBlue Dogs issue new call for House leaders to abide by pay-go rule Trump administration unveils new plan for notifying public on 2020 election interference Overnight Health Care: House Dems clash over Pelosi drug pricing bill | Senate blocks effort to roll back Trump ObamaCare moves | Number of uninsured children rises MORE (Fla.)

"The White House's own memo of the President's call w/Ukraine confirms the President asked a foreign gov't to investigate his political opponent. This is an abuse of executive power. I support the House's ongoing impeachment inquiry to get the facts for the American people," Murphy, a leader of the Blue Dog Coalition, tweeted Sept. 25.

 

Jerry Nadler (N.Y.)

Nadler, the Judiciary Committee chairman, said in August that his panel is conducting an investigation to determine whether to pursue articles of impeachment against Trump. "This is formal impeachment proceedings," Nadler said in an interview with CNN's Erin Burnett.

 

Grace NapolitanoGraciela (Grace) Flores NapolitanoBicameral group of Democrats introduces bill to protect immigrant laborers Latina leaders: 'It's a women's world more than anything' The Hill's 12:30 Report: Muller testimony dominates Washington MORE (Calif.)

A spokesman for Napolitano confirmed the California Democrat supports opening an impeachment inquiry. She also signed on to Tlaib's resolution on June 4.

 

Richard NealRichard Edmund NealOn The Money: Pelosi, Trump tout deal on new NAFTA | McConnell says no trade vote until impeachment trial wraps up | Lawmakers push spending deadline to Thursday AFL-CIO backs Trump's North American trade pact Pelosi announces support for new Trump NAFTA deal MORE (Mass.)

The chairman of the House Ways & Means Committee backed Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s (D-Calif.) Sept. 24 move to open a formal impeachment inquiry against Trump. "I fully support the Speaker's position,” Neal told reporters.

 

Joseph Neguse (Colo.)

“The findings detailed in the Special Counsel’s report, and the Administration’s pattern of wholesale obstruction of Congress since the report’s release, make clear that it is time to open an impeachment inquiry,” Neguse, a Judiciary Committee member, tweeted after McGahn was a no-show.

 

Donald NorcrossDonald W. NorcrossHere are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment WHIP LIST: The 228 House Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry 2020 Presidential Endorsements MORE (N.J.)

"I remain in favor of the impeachment process. The future of our country is at stake. No one is above the law," Norcross tweeted on June 25.

 

Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezBiden narrowly ahead in Iowa as Sanders surges, Warren drops: poll Democrats reach cusp of impeachment Progressives hopeful for deal with Pelosi to avert showdown on drug prices MORE (N.Y.)

Ocasio-Cortez signed on to Tlaib's resolution after the Justice Department released a partially redacted version of Mueller's report on Russia's election interference that laid out 10 instances of Trump potentially obstructing justice.

“It is just as politicized a maneuver to not impeach in the face of overwhelming evidence as it is to impeach w/o cause,” Ocasio-Cortez tweeted on May 21.

“Just as what happens in the House doesn’t control Senate, what happens in the Senate shouldn’t control the House,” she added.

 

Tom O'Halleran (Ariz.)

“Yesterday, I stated my support for the ongoing impeachment inquiry being taken up in the House of Representatives. I later voted against a resolution condemning the inquiry," O'Halleran said in a Sept. 26 statement. “As a former homicide investigator, I know that hard facts and evidence matter. The whistleblower complaint released today demonstrates that we must pursue this official inquiry and promptly complete the investigation so that Congress has all of the facts. My vote on this matter will be based on the evidence gathered during the inquiry process." 

 

Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarBiden narrowly ahead in Iowa as Sanders surges, Warren drops: poll Sanders, Omar to hit campaign trail in New Hampshire House approves two-state resolution in implicit rebuke of Trump MORE (Minn.)

“We must begin impeachment proceedings and investigate if the president committed impeachable offenses,” Omar tweeted after the Mueller report's release. She also co-sponsored Tlaib's resolution.

 

Frank Pallone (N.J.)

Pallone, who chairs the House Energy and Commerce Committee, endorsed impeachment on Sept. 24. “The president has done more than enough to meet the legal standards to justify impeachment. It’s time for Congress to exercise its constitutional authority and impeach the president in order to protect the rule of law and our democracy,” Pallone said. 

 

Jimmy PanettaJames Varni PanettaProviding more information on the prescription drug supply chain will help lower costs for all Bipartisan group reveals agricultural worker immigration bill Mexican president urges Pelosi to get USMCA trade deal approved MORE (Calif.)

"I support this inquiry because, and as I have always stated, we must secure evidence upon which to base such a significant decision as the impeachment of a sitting president.  If the evidence proves that the President explicitly or implicitly sought improper assistance from a foreign leader for his own personal and political gain, he should be impeached," Panetta said in a statement on Sept. 24.

 

Chris PappasChristopher (Chris) Charles PappasOvernight Health Care: Democratic group to only endorse AG candidates who back abortion rights | Protect Our Care launches seven-figure ad buy to boost vulnerable Dems | California sues Juul Group launches seven-figure ad buy boosting vulnerable Democrats on drug prices Pelosi-backed group funding ads for vulnerable Democrats amid impeachment inquiry MORE (N.H.)

"After weeks of careful consideration and after countless conversations with my constituents, I believe it is imperative that Congress continues its oversight work by opening an impeachment inquiry," he said in a video.

 

Bill PascrellWilliam (Bill) James PascrellOn The Money: Pelosi, Trump tout deal on new NAFTA | McConnell says no trade vote until impeachment trial wraps up | Lawmakers push spending deadline to Thursday House panel to consider temporarily repealing SALT deduction cap Pelosi announces support for new Trump NAFTA deal MORE (N.J.)

"The sitting President has disgraced his office and our nation beyond measure. The sitting President has corrupted our institutions for profit. The sitting President has used his tenure to divide our people and increase fear and hatred of our neighbors. The sitting President and his adjutants have evaded and obstructed legitimate attempts of oversight of their debasement, including over the current executive's tax filings and financial entanglements. The sitting President's crimes and obstruction of justice have not abated but accelerated because of failure to constrain him. It is only Congress that can finally hold him to account. We must do this by commencing impeachment hearings of the President," Pascrell said in a statement on July 18, one day after voting in favor of impeachment.

 

Donald Payne (N.J.)

A spokesman said Aug. 1 that Payne supports an immediate move to impeachment, based on evidence complied in the Mueller report. 

 

Nancy Pelosi (Calif.)

After months of resisting calls for impeachment, Pelosi on Sept. 24 announced that she supports a formal impeachment inquiry.

"The President must be held accountable. No one is above the law," she said.

 

Ed PerlmutterEdwin (Ed) George PerlmutterImpeachment surprise: Bills Congress could actually pass in 2020 Financial sector's work on SAFE Banking Act shows together, everyone achieves more House passes bill to protect cannabis industry access to banks, credit unions MORE (Colo.)

"I have and continue to support the impeachment investigation. President Trump needs to be held accountable and he will be," Perlmutter tweeted on Sept. 24.

 

Scott PetersScott H. PetersStatesmen seek bipartisan solutions to big challenges Pelosi heading to Madrid for UN climate change convention Freer housing is 'fairer housing' — HUD should tie funding to looser zoning MORE (Calif.)

"[N]ow we are assigned another solemn task by the Constitution and by current events. We need to begin impeachment hearings," Peters tweeted on June 26. "Some argue impeachment poses a political risk for Democrats. They say Republicans will claim Trump was vindicated regardless of the outcome. That gives Americans too little credit. I trust them to discern which of us did our patriotic duty and who played to political cynicism."

 

Dean PhillipsDean PhillipsKudlow 'very optimistic' on USMCA prospects USMCA deal close, but not 'imminent,' Democrats say Democrats lead Trump by wide margins in Minnesota MORE (Minn.)

Phillips became one of the first Democrats representing a swing district to endorse impeachment in light of Trump encouraging Ukraine's president to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden. Phillips flipped a GOP-held district in 2018 that Hillary Clinton carried in 2016. However, he said his support for impeachment was contingent upon whether the reports are confirmed. "If the reports are corroborated, we must pursue articles of impeachment and report them to the full House of Representatives for immediate consideration," Phillips said in a statement Sept. 23.

 

Chellie PingreeRochelle (Chellie) PingreeOvernight Energy: EPA chief touts benefits of deregulation for environment | Trump officials weaken fish protections Interior chief once lobbied against | USDA watchdog to probe handling of climate reports USDA's internal watchdog to probe allegedly buried climate change reports Congress pumps brakes on Interior push to relocate Bureau of Land Management MORE (Maine)

“As dozens of serious investigations into President Trump and his business interests are underway in state + federal courts, it is in the public interest that Congress continue its own investigations in the face of unprecedented obstruction and move toward an impeachment inquiry,” Pingree tweeted after Mueller’s public appearance.

 

Mark PocanMark William PocanPelosi reaches deal with progressives to avert showdown over drug price bill Armed Services chair calls defense bill 'most progressive in the history of the country' after criticism Overnight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — Progressives hope to avoid drug-pricing showdown with Pelosi | 'Medicare for All' backers get high-profile hearing | Dems take victory lap after eliminating drug protections in trade deal MORE (Wis.)

“Stonewalling Congress on witnesses and the unredacted Mueller report only enhances the President’s appearance of guilt, and as a result, he has pushed Congress to a point where we must start an impeachment inquiry,” tweeted Pocan, a leader of the Congressional Progressive Caucus.

 

Katie Porter (Calif.)

“After weeks of study, deliberation and conversations with Orange County families, I’ve decided to support an impeachment investigation of the president,” Porter said in a video statement she sent out on Twitter.

 

Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleySanders, Omar to hit campaign trail in New Hampshire Booker unveils legislation for federal bill to ban discrimination against natural hair House approves two-state resolution in implicit rebuke of Trump MORE (Mass.)

Pressley is also a co-sponsor of Tlaib's resolution. “There's a lack of moral fortitude and fitness to even be in this office,” Pressley told Boston Public Radio. “I think what we have seen that is unredacted in this report relative to examples of obstruction of justice also gives us the legal grounds.”

 

David PriceDavid Eugene PriceDemocrats likely to gain seats under new North Carolina maps North Carolina ruling could cost GOP House seats Trump officials say aid to Puerto Rico was knowingly stalled after Hurricane Maria MORE (N.C.)

Price came out in support of an impeachment inquiry on Aug. 13, writing, "This will build upon the investigations of the President's grave offenses already underway, giving these inquiries focus and the maximum ability to obtain information in the face of the president's stonewalling and resistance."

 

Mike QuigleyMichael (Mike) Bruce QuigleyDemocrats vow court victories won't slow impeachment timeline Most US birds are facing extinction unless we take action Pelosi: Trump tweets on Yovanovitch show his 'insecurity as an imposter' MORE (Ill.)

“The President’s unacceptable obstruction and his abuses of power have left Congress only one option to fulfill our Constitutional responsibilities: We must open an impeachment inquiry,” Quigley tweeted the day after Mueller’s appearance. “What the Special Counsel was saying is that the ball is in Congress’s court.”

 

Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinDemocrats gear up for high-stakes Judiciary hearing Lawmakers to watch during Wednesday's impeachment hearing Pelosi faces tough choices on impeachment managers MORE (Md.)

Raskin, a member of the Judiciary Committee and the Oversight and Reform Committee, told The Washington Post that “the logic of an impeachment inquiry is pretty overwhelming at this point.” 

 

Kathleen RiceKathleen Maura RiceButtigieg picks up third congressional endorsement from New York lawmaker Democratic lawmaker introduces bill to tackle online terrorist activity NY attorney general to investigate alleged Long Island housing discrimination MORE (N.Y.)

Rice said on Twitter that "Congress has a moral obligation to put our politics aside and take action," calling on lawmakers to begin impeachment hearings. The New York lawmaker had opposed Pelosi's bid for Speakership.

 

Cedric RichmondCedric Levon RichmondBooker unveils legislation for federal bill to ban discrimination against natural hair Hillicon Valley: Senators ask Trump to halt Huawei licenses | Warren criticizes Zuckerberg over secret dinner with Trump | Senior DHS cyber official to leave | Dems offer bill on Libra oversight Senior DHS cyber official to step down MORE (La.)

A spokeswoman confirmed to The Hill that Richmond, a Judiciary Committee member and former Congressional Black Caucus chairman, "does support starting an impeachment inquiry."

 

Max RoseMax Rose'Minor league cities' need new federal partnership Hillicon Valley: Google to limit political ad targeting | Senators scrutinize self-driving car safety | Trump to 'look at' Apple tariff exemption | Progressive lawmakers call for surveillance reforms | House panel advances telecom bills Democratic lawmaker introduces bill to tackle online terrorist activity MORE (N.Y.)

Rose expressed his support for the impeachment inquiry during a town hall in Staten Island on Oct. 2. ""While the president might be willing to violate the Constitution to get re-elected, I will not... It is for that reason that I intend to fully support this impeachment inquiry and follow the facts," Rose said, according to Washington Post reporter Dave Weigel. 

 

Harley RoudaHarley Edwin RoudaDemocrats reach cusp of impeachment Overnight Energy: Dems unveil first bill toward goal of net-zero emissions by 2050 | Oversight panel asks EPA for plans on 'forever chemicals' | EPA finalizes rule easing chemical plant safety regulations Oversight Democrats ask EPA to turn over plans for regulating toxic 'forever chemicals' MORE (Calif.)

Rouda, another freshman in a swing district, confirmed to The Hill on June 27 that he now supports launching an impeachment inquiry. He had previously said he'd back it by the end of June if the Trump administration continued stonewalling Democratic investigations.

 

Lucille Roybal-AllardLucille Roybal-AllardICE emerges as stumbling block in government funding talks Bicameral group of Democrats introduces bill to protect immigrant laborers Lawmakers skeptical of progress on spending deal as wall battle looms MORE (Calif.)

Roybal-Allard voted in favor of Green's impeachment resolution on July 17. Her office confirmed that she supports an impeachment inquiry to determine if there are grounds for removing the president.

 

Raul RuizRaul RuizHispanic Democrats demand flu vaccines for detained migrants Private equity-funded doctors coalition spends million lobbying on 'surprise' medical billing CBO: Fix backed by doctors for surprise medical bills would cost billions MORE (Calif.)

"I am deeply troubled by the recent reports detailing President Trump’s pressuring of the Ukrainian government to interfere in our elections. The fact that the President himself confirmed these reports adds to the gravity of the situation. This is why, out of respect for our Constitution, concern for our national security, and in the interest of my constituents, I am fully supportive of an official impeachment inquiry," Ruiz said in a Facebook post on Sept. 24.

 

Dutch RuppersbergerCharles (Dutch) Albert RuppersbergerLawmakers toast Greta Van Susteren's new show Hillicon Valley: Senate passes bill to boost cyber help for agencies, businesses | Watchdog warns Energy Department failing to protect grid | FTC sues Match for allegedly conning users Senate approves bill to boost cyber assistance for federal agencies, private sector MORE (Md.)

“It appears to me that Trump has committed impeachable offenses. This includes apparent violations of the emoluments clause, obstructing the Mueller investigation, refusing to comply with Congressional subpoenas and so on. Now, we must prove it by building a case using facts and evidence. The case must transcend politics," Ruppersberger said on Sept. 17, adding that he supports the Judiciary Committee's move to formalize procedures for its impeachment investigation.    

 

Bobby RushBobby Lee RushHillicon Valley: Progressives oppose funding bill over surveillance authority | Senators call for 5G security coordinator | Facebook gets questions over location tracking | Louisiana hit by ransomware attack Progressives oppose spending stopgap measure over surveillance authority extension 50 Cent meets with Pelosi, lawmakers on Capitol Hill MORE (Ill.)

“Congressman Rush believes that President Trump should be impeached,” a spokesperson for Rush told WBEZ. “Congress has a responsibility to protect the constitutional foundation of our government with respect for the laws of this great nation. We must not forget that no one is above the law.”

 

Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanGM among partners planning .3B battery plant in Ohio San Francisco 49ers suspend announcer after reference to quarterback's 'dark skin' More than 100 Democrats sign letter calling for Stephen Miller to resign MORE (Ohio)

“When you think that the president has committed crimes — and I’ve read the Mueller report and think he obstructed [justice] on multiple occasions — we have a responsibility," Ryan, who is running for president, said during a CNN town hall on June 2.

 

Linda SanchezLinda Teresa SánchezFirst major 'Medicare for All' hearing sharpens attacks on both sides WHIP LIST: The 228 House Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry We can accelerate a cure for Alzheimer's MORE (Calif.)

"Congress and the American people deserve to know whether the President encouraged a foreign country to interfere with the 2020 election. If it turns out that he did, I believe that President Trump must be impeached," Sanchez said in a statement on Sept. 24.

 

John SarbanesJohn Peter Spyros SarbanesHouse to vote this month on legislation to combat foreign interference in elections Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to testify on Libra | Extremists find home on Telegram app | Warren blasts Facebook for not removing anti-Biden ad | California outlaws facial recognition in police body cameras | China rips US tech sanctions House Democrats introduce new legislation to combat foreign election interference MORE (Md.)

"By any measure, this is impeachable conduct on the part of the President. Every House committee of relevant jurisdiction must move aggressively to gather the underlying evidence and press forward with our efforts to hold President Trump accountable," Sarbanes said of the alleged intelligence community whistleblower complaint on Sept. 24.

 

Mary Gay ScanlonMary Gay ScanlonOvernight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Buttigieg targets Warren, Sanders on health care ahead of debate | Judge overturns ObamaCare transgender protections | Poll sees support drop for 'Medicare for All' Lewandowski refuses to say whether Trump has offered him a pardon Four House Judiciary members say they will 'move forward' with impeachment MORE (Pa.)

“No one is above the law. The time has come to start an impeachment inquiry because the American people deserve to know the truth and to have the opportunity to judge the gravity of the evidence and charges leveled against the president,” Scanlon, the Judiciary Committee's vice chairwoman, said in a statement after McGahn declined to show up for a hearing. 

 

Jan SchakowskyJanice (Jan) Danoff SchakowskyOvernight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — Progressives hope to avoid drug-pricing showdown with Pelosi | 'Medicare for All' backers get high-profile hearing | Dems take victory lap after eliminating drug protections in trade deal 'Medicare for All' backers notch win with high-profile hearing Democrats declare victory for eliminating drug protections in trade deal MORE (Ill.)

“I believe that the House of Representatives should open an impeachment inquiry,” Schakowsky, a Pelosi ally, said in a video posted to social media on June 19.

 

Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffRepublicans consider skipping witnesses in Trump impeachment trial Trump rails against FBI, impeachment during Pennsylvania rally Democrats reach cusp of impeachment MORE (Calif.)

"It's bad enough Trump sought help from a foreign power in the last election. It's worse still that he obstructed the investigation into his misconduct. Now he's admitted using his office to coerce another country to interfere in 2020," Schiff, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, tweeted on September 24. "I fully support the impeachment inquiry."

 

Brad SchneiderBradley (Brad) Scott SchneiderHouse Democrat pushes back against concerns that impeachment inquiry could spark political backlash Dem Congressman discusses plan to keep the house blue The Hill's Morning Report - New impeachment battle: Pompeo vs. House Dems MORE (Ill.)

“These are serious charges that demand further investigation. I previously believed that Congress’s oversight and investigative efforts—through hearings, subpoenas, and lawsuits—were the appropriate vehicle to uncover the truth. Regrettably, it is clear that the Administration has little regard for the Constitution, is unwilling to provide any information to Congress, and is seeking to play out the clock," Schneider said in a press release announcing his support for an impeachment inquiry on Aug. 22.

 

Kurt Schraeder (Ore.)

“After reading the transcript of President Trump’s conversation with the Ukrainian President; hearing President Trump acknowledge the conversation; understanding the illegal obstruction by the DNI for the Intelligence Committee to see the whistleblower report; hearing the concerns of intelligence committee members from both sides of the aisle after viewing the report; seeing the bipartisan, bicameral universal support to make the detailed whistleblower report public to the American people; and finally, reading the complete whistleblower transcript this morning; I feel an impeachment inquiry is indeed justified," Schraeder said in a Sept. 26 statement.

 

Kim SchrierKimberly (Kim) Merle SchrierSwing-seat Democrats oppose impeachment, handing Pelosi leverage Second Democrat representing Trump district backs impeachment House Democrats inch toward majority support for impeachment MORE (Wash.)

"The people of #WA08 elected me to protect their health care & our environment. Those will always remain my focus while I have the privilege of serving them in Congress," Schrier tweeted July 28. "They also elected me uphold the Constitution. So, I am formally calling for an impeachment inquiry."

 

Bobby ScottRobert (Bobby) Cortez ScottThis week: House impeachment inquiry hits crucial stretch Overnight Health Care: House to vote next week on drug prices bill | Conway says Trump trying to find 'balance' on youth vaping | US spent trillion on hospitals in 2018 House to vote next week on sweeping bill to lower drug prices MORE (Va.)

“Every Member of Congress swore an oath to uphold and defend the Constitution. I therefore support Speaker Pelosi’s call for a formal impeachment inquiry. It is the only appropriate course of action given the severity of recent events," Scott, the Education and Labor Committee chairman, said on Sept. 24.

 

David ScottDavid Albert ScottInside the progressive hunt for vulnerable House Democrats Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Harris hops past Biden in early race for Black Caucus support MORE (Ga.)

"This Ukraine development weighs very heavily and is very concerning to me. I believe it is time now to open an inquiry for impeachment. We have got to get the facts," Scott said in a statement on Sept. 24.

 

José Serrano (N.Y.)

Serrano announced his support for an inquiry in a July 29 statement, writing, "I make this statement with a heavy heart. As one of the few current Members of the House who served during the last impeachment proceedings in 1998, I am particularly aware of the wrenching nature of this constitutional process."

"It puts deep strain on our institution and on our democracy. To take steps towards impeachment is to understand that the threat to our nation is so great, and the ability to find recourse elsewhere is so slim, that we have no other choice. In my opinion, we have now reached that point."

 

Terri SewellTerrycina (Terri) Andrea SewellSenate must take up Voting Rights Advancement Act without delay The missing piece of the current health care debate House passes bill meant to restore Voting Rights Act MORE (Ala.)

In a statement on Sept. 24 labeled "statement on impeachment inquiry," Sewell said. “The events surrounding the whistleblower complaint are the final straw in a series of troubling and disconcerting actions by President Trump and his administration."

 

Donna ShalalaDonna Edna ShalalaOvernight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — Deal on surprise medical bills faces obstacles | House GOP unveils rival drug pricing measure ahead of Pelosi vote | Justices to hear case over billions in ObamaCare payments Three legal scholars say Trump should be impeached; one thinks otherwise Overnight Defense: Trump cancels presser, cuts short NATO trip | Viral video catches leaders appearing to gossip about Trump | Dem witnesses say Trump committed impeachable offenses | Trump reportedly mulling more troops in Middle East MORE (Fla.)

"If the Acting Director of National Intelligence chooses to violate the law and not hand over both the report and complaint to Congress, together with any transcripts related to the allegations in the report, I have no other choice but to support beginning an impeachment investigation," Shalala said Sept. 24.

 

Brad Sherman (Calif.)

A spokeswoman says Sherman supports an impeachment inquiry.

 

Mikie SherrillRebecca (Mikie) Michelle SherrillHillicon Valley: Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract in court | State antitrust investigation into Google expands | Intel agencies no longer collecting location data without warrant Bipartisan bill to secure election tech advances to House floor Our commitment to veterans can help us lead for all Americans MORE (N.J.)

Sherrill and six other freshman House Democrats largely representing competitive districts wrote in a Washington Post op-ed on Sept. 23 that if the allegations that Trump pressed Ukraine's leader to investigate Biden "are true, we believe these actions represent an impeachable offense." "We do not arrive at this conclusion lightly, and we call on our colleagues in Congress to consider the use of all congressional authorities available to us, including the power of “inherent contempt” and impeachment hearings, to address these new allegations, find the truth and protect our national security," they wrote.

 

Albio SiresAlbio B. SiresHouse passes resolution disapproving of Russia being included in future G7 summits House to vote on resolution opposing Russia's inclusion in G-7 Lawmakers spar over surveillance flight treaty with Russia MORE (N.J.)

Sires joined calls for an impeachment inquiry in light of Trump acknowledging that he discussed investigating Biden with Ukraine's president. "Up until now, I wanted to follow the ongoing congressional investigations to their conclusions and using the facts uncovered to make a decision about impeachment. However, these developments raise the urgency to a new level and I join many of my colleagues, and our constituents, in calling for an impeachment inquiry – we must uphold our oaths to protect the country, even if the President will not," Sires said Sept. 24.

 

Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinPelosi's whiplash moment brings praise and criticism Pro-trade group launches media buy as Trump and Democrats near deal on new NAFTA Iran building hidden arsenal of short-range ballistic missiles in Iraq: report MORE (Mich.)

Slotkin and six other freshman House Democrats largely representing competitive districts wrote in a Washington Post op-ed on Sept. 23 that if the allegations that Trump pressed Ukraine's leader to investigate Biden "are true, we believe these actions represent an impeachable offense." "We do not arrive at this conclusion lightly, and we call on our colleagues in Congress to consider the use of all congressional authorities available to us, including the power of “inherent contempt” and impeachment hearings, to address these new allegations, find the truth and protect our national security," they wrote.

 

Xochitl Torres Small (N.M.)

"If we refuse to seek the truth, we risk our safety and the integrity of the very Constitution I swore to support and defend," she wrote in an op-ed on Oct. 10.

 

Adam SmithDavid (Adam) Adam SmithBombshell Afghanistan report bolsters calls for end to 'forever wars' Overnight Defense: Dems unveil impeachment articles against Trump | Saudi military flight students grounded after shooting | Defense bill takes heat from progressives | Pentagon watchdog to probe use of personnel on border Armed Services chair calls defense bill 'most progressive in the history of the country' after criticism MORE (Wash.)

Smith chairs the House Armed Services Committee. “Congressman Smith believes we must move forward with an impeachment inquiry,” Shana Chandler, Smith’s chief of staff, said, according to The Seattle Times. “President Trump has continued his efforts to obstruct justice and undermine Congress as a coequal branch of government and proceeding with an impeachment inquiry — the first step in a lengthy and difficult process — is the best way to demand accountability from this administration.”

 

Darren SotoDarren Michael SotoDemocrats demand FCC act over leak of phone location data Overnight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Buttigieg targets Warren, Sanders on health care ahead of debate | Judge overturns ObamaCare transgender protections | Poll sees support drop for 'Medicare for All' Hispanic voters push campaigns to address gun violence MORE (Fla.)

"Per Chair Nadler, @HouseJudiciary is already in impeachment inquiry," Soto tweeted on Sept. 12. "I'm supportive as it's our oversight duties. Trump is accused of obstructing justice, hush money to cover up affairs, & violating Emoluments Clause. I remain open-minded about impeachment."

 

Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerPro-Trump group targets Democrats with 'End the Witch Hunt' campaign Club for Growth extends advertising against House Dems over impeachment NRCC campaign prank leads to suspicious package investigation MORE (Va.)

Spanberger and six other freshman House Democrats largely representing competitive districts wrote in a Washington Post op-ed on Sept. 23 that if the allegations that Trump pressed Ukraine's leader to investigate Biden "are true, we believe these actions represent an impeachable offense." "We do not arrive at this conclusion lightly, and we call on our colleagues in Congress to consider the use of all congressional authorities available to us, including the power of “inherent contempt” and impeachment hearings, to address these new allegations, find the truth and protect our national security," they wrote.

  

Jackie SpeierKaren (Jackie) Lorraine Jacqueline SpeierPelosi faces tough choices on impeachment managers Speier to call on IG investigation into Navy chief's firing Nunes faces potential ethics review over alleged meeting with Ukrainian official MORE (Calif.)

“I believe that an inquiry into impeachment is required at this point in time,” Speier, a member of the Oversight and Reform Committee, told CNN's “New Day.”

 

Greg StantonGregory (Greg) John StantonWho are the House Democrats backing Trump impeachment? WHIP LIST: The 228 House Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry Arizona Dems ask DHS to appoint 'crisis coordinator' at border MORE (Ariz.)

Stanton, a Judiciary Committee member, endorsed opening an impeachment inquiry a day after Mueller broke his silence. "It is time for the House of Representatives to move to the next stages of holding the President accountable, including the extraordinary step of opening an impeachment inquiry. This is a conclusion I reached only recently, and not one I reached lightly," Stanton said in a statement.

 

Haley StevensHaley Maria StevensRussian judge orders ex-Marine to be detained through December on espionage charges House calls on Russia to release Paul Whelan or else provide evidence of wrongdoing Pelosi-backed group funding ads for vulnerable Democrats amid impeachment inquiry MORE (Mich.)

Stevens said in a statement on Sept. 24 that she was “deeply alarmed by reports of serious abuse of power by President Trump” after a whistleblower complaint sparked reporting that Trump pressured the president of Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden and the 2020 Democratic frontrunner’s son.

 

Tom Suozzi (N.Y.)

“We must now build the case and establish sufficient evidence to garner a majority of the House to support impeachment and sufficient evidence that will require any rational member of the Senate to convict,” he said in a statement on Sept. 24.

 

Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellLawmakers prep ahead of impeachment hearing Trump: Fox News 'panders' to Democrats by having on liberal guests Democrats could introduce articles of impeachment next week MORE (Calif.)

"Congress has no choice: we must begin an impeachment inquiry against @realDonaldTrump. He has invited the Russians to again sabotage our elections. And he has obstructed (& obstructs) justice. Time to be held accountable. Our democracy is worth saving," Swalwell tweeted June 13 after Trump told ABC News he'd accept dirt on political rivals from foreign governments. Swalwell is a Judiciary Committee member and is running for president. 

 

Mark TakanoMark Allan TakanoMark Takano keeps using partisan tactics when legislating veterans issues Hillicon Valley: Google buying Fitbit for .1B | US launches national security review of TikTok | Twitter shakes up fight over political ads | Dems push committee on 'revenge porn' law Progressives urge end to mass phone data collection program MORE (Calif.) 

Takano said he had concluded that the Mueller investigation found that Trump welcomed Russia's help in the 2016 election and obstructed Mueller's investigation.

"That is why today, with solemnity, in accordance with the fundamental duties outlined for me, a Member of Congress, in Article I of the Constitution, I am announcing my support for formally launching impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump," he said in an Aug. 22 video statement to constituents.

 

Bennie ThompsonBennie Gordon ThompsonJudge temporarily halts construction of a private border wall in Texas Hillicon Valley: FCC moves against Huawei, ZTE | Dem groups ask Google to reconsider ads policy | Bill introduced to increase data access during probes House GOP criticizes impeachment drive as distracting from national security issues MORE (Miss.)

The House Homeland Security Committee chairman said after Mueller spoke that "I support impeachment."

"The special counsel did not give any indication that the President is innocent," Thompson said in a statement. "Therefore, it is time for Congress to perform its oversight duties." Thompson previously voted twice in favor of articles of impeachment from Green in 2017 and 2018 on the House floor.

 

Mike ThompsonCharles (Mike) Michael ThompsonOn The Money: Pelosi, Trump tout deal on new NAFTA | McConnell says no trade vote until impeachment trial wraps up | Lawmakers push spending deadline to Thursday House panel to consider temporarily repealing SALT deduction cap Overnight Energy: Mark Ruffalo pushes Congress on 'forever chemicals' | Lawmakers spar over actor's testimony | House Dems unveil renewable energy tax plan | Funding for conservation program passes Senate hurdle MORE (Calif.)

"The President asking for help on his campaign from a foreign government is against the law with or without a quid pro quo. This is a matter of national security and I fully support Speaker Pelosi’s move to an impeachment inquiry," Thompson tweeted on Sept. 24.

 

Dina TitusAlice (Dina) Costandina TitusThe US needs to lead again on disability rights Krystal Ball: New Biden ad is everything that's wrong with Democrats Top Latina adviser quits Biden campaign MORE (Nev.)

"My decision isn't based on my disagreements with the President's policies or my disapproval of his temperament, though I have both," Titus said on July 29. "I'm calling for an impeachment inquiry because of the mounting evidence that Donald Trump has repeatedly broken the law to protect his own interests.

 

Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibBiden narrowly ahead in Iowa as Sanders surges, Warren drops: poll The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by UANI — GOP, Democrats square off at final impeachment hearing Live coverage: Democrats, Republicans seek to win PR battle in final House impeachment hearing MORE (Mich.)

In addition to her impeachment inquiry resolution, Tlaib drew attention on her first day as a member of Congress in January for pledging to a crowd of supporters that “we're going to impeach the motherf---er.”

 

Paul TonkoPaul David TonkoDemocrats unveil first bill toward goal of net-zero emissions by 2050 House committee advances sweeping legislation to battle 'forever chemicals' Overnight Energy: Trump officials suspend oil, gas production on Utah plots after lawsuit | California bucks Trump on lightbulb rollback | Scientists join Dems in panning EPA's 'secret science' rule MORE (N.Y.)

"After careful review of the evidence and testimony currently available, and in service to my oath, it is my judgment that Congress needs to accept the baton being handed to us by now former Special Counsel Mueller and open an impeachment inquiry to more fully assess the Constitutional implications of seemingly criminal actions by the President and his campaign, and to determine whether formal impeachment charges need to be filed," Tonko wrote in a series of tweets five days after Mueller's on-camera statement.

 

Norma TorresNorma Judith TorresTrump keeps Obama immigration program, and Democrats blast him Lawmakers press for ICE reforms after fake school report Adam Schiff's star rises with impeachment hearings MORE (Calif.)

"I think there is enough evidence in front of us to move forward," Torres told The Washington Post after the Mueller report's release. 

 

Lori TrahanLori A. Trahan'Minor league cities' need new federal partnership Ethics panel reviewing freshman Democrat over campaign finance complaint House Democrats inch toward majority support for impeachment MORE (Mass.)

Trahan announced her support for an impeachment inquiry following Mueller's testimony before Congress on July 24. She also voted in favor of Green's impeachment resolution a week earlier.

"Mueller's message to the American people today was clear: his report did not exonerate the president, and that there is ample evidence that the president broke the law by repeatedly engaging in efforts to obstruct the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election," Trahan said in a statement.

 

David TroneDavid John TroneBicameral group of Democrats introduces bill to protect immigrant laborers Overnight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Buttigieg targets Warren, Sanders on health care ahead of debate | Judge overturns ObamaCare transgender protections | Poll sees support drop for 'Medicare for All' Maryland lawmakers slam 'despicable' Trump remark about journalists on newsroom shooting anniversary MORE (Md.)

“The President has abused the office of the presidency and broken our public trust. Because of this, I support the Speaker’s decision to open an impeachment inquiry and do everything in our power to uncover the truth and save our democracy,” Trone said in a statement on Sept. 24.

 

Lauren UnderwoodLauren UnderwoodRep. Veronica Escobar elected to represent freshman class in House leadership Brindisi, Lamb recommended for Armed Services, Transportation Committees Club for Growth extends advertising against House Dems over impeachment MORE (Ill.)

"The petition Chairman Nadler filed on July 26 clearly states that the Judiciary Committee is investigating whether to recommend Articles of Impeachment, essentially an impeachment inquiry. I support this investigation," Underwood, a freshman who flipped a GOP-held seat last fall, said in a statement on Aug. 20. 
 
 

Juan VargasJuan C. VargasLawmakers visit African migrants at US-Mexico border Overnight Defense: Protests at Trump's NYC Veterans Day speech | House Dems release Pentagon official's deposition transcript | Lawmakers ask Trump to rescind Erdogan invite Bipartisan House members call on Trump to rescind Erdoğan invitation MORE (Calif.)

Vargas told The Hill recently that he supports the impeachment inquiry. "I think we should start the impeachment process. … I think it gets us to a place where we can get this information, and then frankly be able to make a determination."

 

Marc VeaseyMarc Allison VeaseyDemocrats decry Trump's push to slash number of accepted refugees Lawmakers beat Capitol Police in Congressional Football Game Why the Helsinki Commission still matters MORE (Texas)

Veasey on Sept. 24 endorsed moving forward with an impeachment inquiry. "While we are still gathering the full facts of what occurred between the president and the foreign leader, I believe Congress must act now in the face of our president's continued dangerous behavior," Veasey said.

 

Filemon VelaFilemon Bartolome VelaA dozen House Democrats call on EU ambassador to resign amid Ukraine scandal Here are the Democrats who aren't co-sponsoring an assault weapons ban DCCC faces mass staff shakeup: 'It's the Monday Night Massacre' MORE (Texas)

Vela has signed on to Tlaib's resolution calling for an impeachment inquiry.

 

Nydia Velázquez (N.Y.)

Velázquez cited the findings in Mueller's investigation, as well as Trump's comments to ABC News expressing openness to accepting dirt from foreign governments on his political opponents. "Today, given the facts available, I believe an impeachment inquiry is the only path forward," Velazquez said in a video posted to her Twitter account on June 20. Velázquez chairs the House Small Business Committee and previously voted in favor of Green's articles of impeachment.

 

Pete Visclosky (Ind.)

"I support Speaker Pelosi’s announcement that the U.S. House of Representatives is moving forward with an official impeachment inquiry," Visclosky tweeted on Sept. 25.

 

Debbie Wasserman SchultzDeborah (Debbie) Wasserman SchultzOn The Money: Trump signs short-term spending bill to avoid shutdown | Pelosi casts doubt on USMCA deal in 2019 | California high court strikes down law targeting Trump tax returns Wasserman Schultz makes bid for House Appropriations Committee gavel Overnight Defense: Erdoğan gets earful from GOP senators | Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract decision in court | Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families MORE (Fla.)

“This President’s reckless and habitual disregard for our laws leaves Congress no choice. Impeachment inquiry hearings must commence immediately. To do otherwise would be a betrayal of our democracy,” the former Democratic National Committee Chairwoman said in a statement on Sept. 24.

 

Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersCalifornia GOP candidate arrested on stalking charges Maxine Waters earns viral praise for steadfast calls for impeachment as articles announced Democrats could introduce articles of impeachment next week MORE (Calif.)

Waters was one of the first Democrats to call for Trump's impeachment. Waters told CNN in a recent interview that Trump has “done everything that one could even think of to be eligible for impeachment.”

 

Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchProviding more information on the prescription drug supply chain will help lower costs for all Impeachment hearing breaks into laughter after Democrat contrasts it to Hallmark movie Diplomat ties Trump closer to Ukraine furor MORE (Vt.)

"On January 20, 2017, President-elect Donald Trump stood on the West Front of the United States Capitol, placed his left hand on two Bibles, raised his right hand, and swore to 'preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.' I have concluded that he has failed to honor that solemn oath which, in my view, merits impeachment under our Constitution," he said in a statement.

 

Jennifer WextonJennifer Lynn WextonPro-trade group launches media buy as Trump and Democrats near deal on new NAFTA Democrat unveils bill requiring banks to identify suspicious activity related to guns Newly-elected official feels 'stronger' than she did when she flipped off Trump's motorcade MORE (Va.)

Wexton, who represents Virginia’s moderate suburban 10th District, announced her support for beginning an impeachment inquiry on July 30. “As a former prosecutor, it is clear to me given the conduct by the president detailed in the Mueller Report and Director Mueller’s recent testimony before Congress that — were he not a sitting president — Donald Trump would be indicted on charges for obstruction of justice," she said. 

“After much deliberation, I believe the time has come for the House of Representatives to assert our constitutional responsibility and begin an impeachment inquiry.”

 

Susan WildSusan WildOvernight Health Care: Democratic group to only endorse AG candidates who back abortion rights | Protect Our Care launches seven-figure ad buy to boost vulnerable Dems | California sues Juul Group launches seven-figure ad buy boosting vulnerable Democrats on drug prices Overnight Defense: Protests at Trump's NYC Veterans Day speech | House Dems release Pentagon official's deposition transcript | Lawmakers ask Trump to rescind Erdogan invite MORE (Pa.)

"Today, I am announcing that, should the administration continue to withhold the whistleblower complaint at the heart of this matter, I will support an impeachment inquiry of the President of the United States," Wild said on Sept. 24.

 

Frederica WilsonFrederica Patricia WilsonBlack lawmakers condemn Trump's 'lynching' remarks Ten notable Democrats who do not favor impeachment Assault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress MORE (Fla.)

“Democrats are the party of law and order, national security and patriotism. This is a matter of urgency. The President has endangered our safety,” Wilson said in a statement released on twitter on Sept. 25. "I fully support the House impeachment inquiry."

 

John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthOvernight Defense: Erdoğan gets earful from GOP senators | Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract decision in court | Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families Kentucky Democrat: McConnell's agenda driven by 'power without a purpose' MORE (Ky.)

“I've been there a long time,” Yarmuth told The Hill when confirming he supports launching an impeachment inquiry, noting he co-sponsored an impeachment resolution in the previous Congress when Republicans controlled the House.

 

Updated on Oct. 10 at 10:21 a.m.