WHIP LIST: The 130 House Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry

More than half the House Democratic caucus is now calling for the beginning of an impeachment inquiry for President Trump.

While Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) has resisted beginning an inquiry, in part from worries that doing so could imperil Democrats who won swing districts in 2018, she is facing growing support for it in her party.

ADVERTISEMENT

Former special counsel Robert Mueller's testimony in July led to a new wave of Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry, and the president's attacks on Democratic members of Congress, including Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsGOP Oversight report says Interior head met with group tied to former clients Nadler asks other House chairs to provide records that would help panel in making impeachment decision Nikki Haley voices 'complete support' for Pence MORE (D-Md.), almost certainly has led more support to the charge.

Some Democrats have signed on to a resolution from Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) that calls on the Judiciary Committee to inquire whether the House should impeach Trump.

Rep. Justin Amash (Mich.) is the only non-Democrat in the House to back an impeachment inquiry. He became the first Republican to say Trump has engaged in impeachable conduct — but later quit the GOP and became an independent. 

It would take 218 votes in the House to impeach Trump, and 67 votes in the Senate to convict him. 

Here's a tally of which lawmakers have endorsed launching an impeachment inquiry of Trump.

This list will be updated.

Democrats calling for impeachment inquiry (130)

 

Alma Adams (N.C.)

"Impeachment is not off the table. However, before we move forward the American people deserve all the facts. That is why I support an impeachment inquiry. Congress has a sacred responsibility to obtain the information necessary to determine the next steps," Adams said in a statement two days after Mueller's remarks.

 

Pete AguilarPeter (Pete) Ray AguilarDemocratic leaders seek balance amid liberal push to go big on immigration Katherine Clark quietly eyes leadership ascent The Hill's Morning Report - Crunch time arrives for 2020 Dems with debates on deck MORE (Calif.)

"Special Counsel Mueller's report and testimony clearly outlined unacceptable, inappropriate and potentially criminal conduct by the president, including obstruction of justice," Aguilar said in a statement Aug. 1.

"After careful consideration and conversations with members of my community, I believe it is time for the House to begin proceedings to determine whether the president's conduct meets the standards of impeachment.

 

Nanette Diaz Barragán (Calif.)

A spokeswoman for Barragán confirmed to The Hill that the California Democrat supports an impeachment inquiry.

 

Joyce Beatty (Ohio)

"I support Congress continuing to use our oversight and investigative tools to get to the bottom of any wrongdoing. I ultimately believe this process will lead to an impeachment inquiry, which I would support for the people and to keep America great," Beatty said in a statement on May 31.

 

Don Beyer (Va.)

“For me, the final two straws were Don McGahn refusing to come forward after a perfectly reasonable request for him to appear and then [Treasury Secretary Steven] Mnuchin writing us back saying he’s not going to honor the subpoena on Trump’s tax returns when the law is crystal clear,” Beyer told The Hill.



Earl BlumenauerEarl BlumenauerAirports already have plenty of infrastructure funding Climate protesters glue themselves to Capitol doors, confront lawmakers Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment MORE (Ore.)

Blumenauer signed on to Tlaib’s resolution.

 

Lisa Blunt Rochester (Del.)
 
“During Director Mueller’s seven hours of testimony yesterday, he made it very clear that President Trump was not exonerated in his investigation and that the President wasn’t always truthful in the written answers he submitted. These uncertainties, along with the evident misconduct of the President, warrant an impeachment inquiry so that the American people can finally hear the whole truth that they are entitled to,” Blunt Rochester said in a statement on July 25. 

 

Suzanne BonamiciSuzanne Marie BonamiciHouse lawmakers introduce bill to help those struggling with student debt Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Lawmakers put spotlight on youth homelessness MORE (Ore.)

"The House of Representatives must begin an impeachment inquiry," Bonamici tweeted.

 

Brendan Boyle (Pa.)

"It’s clear now that Congress must hold hearings on the findings of the Special Counsel, including the witnesses who gave testimony to investigators. It’s time to officially start Impeachment Hearings," Boyle tweeted on May 29 after Mueller spoke.

 

Anthony BrownAnthony Gregory BrownAssault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment The Hill's Morning Report — Trump retreats on census citizenship question MORE (Md.)

"I fully support the House Judiciary Committee’s formal inquiry into whether to recommend impeachment of President Trump, and I know they will continue to do the hard work to protect our democracy, constitution, and the American people," Brown tweeted on Aug. 16.

 

Julia BrownleyJulia Andrews BrownleyKatherine Clark quietly eyes leadership ascent California Democrats unveil redistricting reform bill after Supreme Court partisan gerrymandering ruling WHIP LIST: The 130 House Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry MORE (Calif.)

"I believe the Mueller report, on its own, shows egregious encouragement for a foreign adversary to undermine our democracy, and irrefutable evidence of obstruction of justice," Brownley said in a statement on July 23, the day before special counsel Robert Mueller was set to testify before Congress. "Further, President Trump’s repeated statements that he invites future illegal, foreign interference in our elections, his repeated current attempts to obstruct Congress’ oversight authority, and his clear intent to continue to obstruct justice and the will of Congress, create an urgency of action. I am, therefore, calling for the immediate opening of an impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump."

 

G.K. ButterfieldGeorge (G.K.) Kenneth ButterfieldDemocrats call for increased security after 'send her back' chants The Hill's Morning Report - Trump seizes House impeachment vote to rally GOP Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment MORE (N.C.)
“The evidence that has been produced so far is sufficient in my opinion to support an impeachment inquiry and impeachment and removal,” Butterfield told McClatchy on May 30. “I am prepared to vote for an impeachment inquiry ... and I will vote for impeachment and removal.”

 

Salud CarbajalSalud CarbajalHispanic Democrats: ICE raids designed to distract from Trump ties to Epstein Democrats wary of Trump's 'erratic' approach to Iran WHIP LIST: The 130 House Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry MORE (Calif.)

Carbajal said on Aug. 2 that he backed an impeachment inquiry, stating that Trump cannot be "above the law."

 

Tony Cárdenas (Calif.)

"After carefully studying the Mueller report and watching how this President instructs current and former officials to ignore Congressional subpoenas and to act unlawfully, Congress has no choice but to open an impeachment inquiry into President Trump," Cárdenas said in a statement on June 20.

 

Andre CarsonAndré CarsonTrump crosses new line with Omar, Tlaib, Israel move House Democrats urge Trump to end deportations of Iraqis after diabetic man's death Live coverage: Mueller testifies before Congress MORE (Ind.)

Carson voted in favor of an impeachment resolution from Rep. Al Green (D-Texas) on July 17. A spokesman for Carson confirmed to The Hill that he supports launching an impeachment inquiry.

 

Sean Casten (Ill.)

"I do not celebrate this moment but neither do I shirk from this responsibility; the truth must prevail," he said in a statement on June 20.

 

Joaquin Castro (Texas)

“It’s time for Congress to open an impeachment inquiry. There is political risk in doing so, but there’s a greater risk to our country in doing nothing,” Castro tweeted. “This is a fight for our democracy.”

 

Judy ChuJudy May ChuLawmakers urge DNC to name Asian American debate moderator US must stay true to its values and fight the public charge rule Pelosi predicts Trump public charge rule will be 'swiftly challenged and defeated' MORE (Calif.)

"I believe it is time for Congress to open an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. The proceedings must be deliberate and transparent. We have a sacred duty as members of Congress to ensure that nobody is above the law. To do nothing given what we know is unacceptable,” she said in part in a statement July 31. Chu is chair of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus. 

 

David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineFirst House Republican backs bill banning assault weapons Hillicon Valley: O'Rourke proposal targets tech's legal shield | Dem wants public review of FCC agreement with T-Mobile, Sprint | Voters zero in on cybersecurity | Instagram to let users flag misinformation Democrat calls for public review of T-Mobile-Sprint merger agreement MORE (R.I.)

Cicilline, a member of Democratic leadership and the House Judiciary Committee, called for starting an impeachment inquiry if McGahn didn't appear for the hearing.

“If Don McGahn does not testify tomorrow, it will be time to begin an impeachment inquiry of @realDonaldTrump,” Cicilline tweeted on the eve of McGahn's absence from the Judiciary Committee hearing.

 

Katherine ClarkKatherine Marlea ClarkThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump searches for backstops amid recession worries Fourth-ranking House Democrat backs Trump impeachment Toni Morrison dies at 88 MORE (Mass.)

Clark, the Democratic caucus vice chair, on July 25 became the highest-ranking member of leadership to back an impeachment inquiry.

"I deeply respect the committee work of House Democrats to hold the president accountable, including hearings, subpoenas and lawsuits. All of our efforts to put the facts before the American people, however, have been met with unprecedented stonewalling and obstruction. That is why I believe we need to open an impeachment inquiry that will provide us a more formal way to fully uncover the facts," Clark said in a statement the day after Mueller's testimony.

 

Yvette Clarke (N.Y.)

"America is better than having a lying, corrupt, Bigot-in-Chief. Enough with 45’s nonsense. It’s time for an impeachment inquiry. #notmypresident" Clarke tweeted on June 18. She also co-sponsored Tlaib's resolution.

 

Wm. Lacy Clay (Mo.)

"Impeachment is the only constitutionally available remedy that would directly address President Trump's blatant and repeated attempts to obstruct justice and repeatedly lied to Congress, and most importantly lied to the American people," Clay said in a statement on June 21. Clay co-sponsored both Tlaib's resolution and an article of impeachment from Rep. Brad Sherman (D-Calif.) that accuses Trump of obstructing justice.

 

Emanuel Cleaver (Mo.)

"After reading Special Counsel Mueller’s redacted report and listening to his testimony, it’s clear to me that they indicate the President committed one or more instances of obstruction of justice while in office," he said in a statement. "When looking at the evidence presented, there is obviously enough smoke to investigate the potential fire of corruption."

 

Steve Cohen (Tenn.)
Cohen introduced articles of impeachment in the previous session of Congress that accused Trump of obstructing justice. “I think he's committed impeachable offenses and he ought to be impeached,” said Cohen, a Judiciary Committee member.

 

Bonnie Watson ColemanBonnie Watson ColemanHere are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Racial politics roil Democratic Party Harris hops past Biden in early race for Black Caucus support MORE (N.J.)

"The President has shown a disregard not only for Congress's oversight powers, but disregard for the rulings of the Supreme Court. I promised to fight for my constituents and that's why I'm calling for an #ImpeachmentInquiryNow. Keep speaking up, keep standing up, keep showing up," Watson Coleman tweeted on July 11.

 

Gerry ConnollyGerald (Gerry) Edward ConnollyHistory in the House: Congress weathers unprecedented week Democrat grills DHS chief over viral image of drowned migrant and child Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers struggle to understand Facebook's Libra project | EU hits Amazon with antitrust probe | New cybersecurity concerns over census | Robocall, election security bills head to House floor | Privacy questions over FaceApp MORE (Va.)

"We stand at a perilous moment for our country. No individual should be above the law. No individual should act the way this president behaves without consequence. No administration should be allowed to disregard the constitution at their whim. Now more than ever, Congress must assert its constitutional role and that is why I believe we must immediately start an impeachment inquiry into President Trump,” he said in a statement on Aug. 8.

 

Jason CrowJason CrowSecond Democrat representing Trump district backs impeachment House Democrats request sit-down with McConnell to talk guns Assault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress MORE (Colo.)

"After reading Robert Mueller’s report, hearing his testimony, and responding to President Trump’s repeated stonewalling of Congress, it’s clear that our democracy faces substantial risks that require congressional action," Crow said in a Medium post on July 30.
 

Danny K. Davis (Ill.)

Davis announced on May 28 that he would sign on to Tlaib's resolution, saying that "I believe it is time" that the House begin an impeachment inquiry. "President Trump’s actions are challenging the very essence of our democracy," Davis said in a statement.

 

Madeleine DeanMadeleine DeanDemocratic leaders seek to have it both ways on impeachment Giuliani: Mueller should not testify before Congress Matt Gaetz ahead of Mueller hearing: 'We are going to reelect the president' MORE (Pa.)

Dean, a member of the Judiciary Committee, in an appearance on MSNBC's "Hardball," said she backed launching an impeachment inquiry.

 

 
"I believe that the time has come for the Judiciary Committee to open a formal impeachment inquiry and collect the evidence necessary to build a strong case against President Trump. His presidency is a danger to our national security and a threat to our democracy," DeFazio, the House Transportation Committee chairman, said in a statement on July 25 roughly 24 hours after Mueller's testimony before Congress.
 

Diana DeGette (Colo.)

“The facts laid out in the Mueller report, coupled with this administration’s ongoing attempts to stonewall Congress, leave us no other choice: It is time for Congress to officially launch an impeachment inquiry against the President of the United States,” DeGette tweeted. She formally signed on to Tlaib's measure on May 23.

 

Suzan Delbene (Wash.)

“It gives me no pleasure to announce that I am calling for the House of Representatives to begin an impeachment inquiry into the President of the United States," Delbene said in a statement on July 28.

“The notion that a sitting President would attempt to derail an investigation of a direct attack on our democracy is shocking, unpatriotic, and a violation of the oath we share. The President has taken virtually no action to try to prevent Russia or other foreign powers from meddling in our free and fair elections in the future."

 

Val Demings (Fla.)

Demings, a Judiciary Committee member, said last month after the Mueller report's release that “I think we have enough” to move forward with impeachment. “I think we have great evidence that the president has blatantly violated so many laws. It’s just ridiculous,” Demings said during a Democratic caucus conference call. 

 

Mark DeSaulnier (Calif.)

"Congress must do its job, which includes overriding the DOJ policy that protects the president under any circumstance, and beginning an impeachment inquiry," DeSaulnier said in a statement after Mueller's May 29 appearance.

 

Ted DeutchTheodore (Ted) Eliot DeutchHobbled NRA shows strength with Trump House Democrats urge Trump to end deportations of Iraqis after diabetic man's death House conservatives call for ethics probe into Joaquin Castro tweet MORE (Fla.)

A spokesman for Deutch on Aug. 1 told The Hill that he would support an impeachment inquiry, though the congressman believes the House Judiciary Committee has already effectively started one with its investigation. "While he believes that there’s no need for a formal vote to open an inquiry and that we’ve been in one since the Committee started its investigation, he would support a vote to do so," the spokesman said. 

 

Lloyd Doggett (Texas)

Doggett's office confirmed to The Hill that he supports opening an impeachment inquiry. “What Mueller thought he could not do, Congress can no longer avoid," Doggett said in a statement.

 

Mike DoyleMichael (Mike) F. DoyleHere are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment House panel advances anti-robocall bill House Democrats seek bipartisan working group on net neutrality MORE (Pa.)

"Congress has the authority to subpoena any information necessary to carry out its oversight responsibilities. But the Administration refuses to comply with subpoenas and continues to prevent witnesses from testifying. I believe that it’s time to initiate an #Impeachment inquiry," Doyle tweeted on June 21.

 

Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelNadler asks other House chairs to provide records that would help panel in making impeachment decision Trump moves forward with billion F-16 sale to Taiwan Pelosi warns Mnuchin to stop 'illegal' .3B cut to foreign aid MORE (N.Y.)

"The President abused the power of his office in an effort to stymie a legitimate investigation into his campaign’s involvement with Russia," Engel, chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, said in a statement on July 30. "The American people want, and deserve, the truth. I believe the House must pursue a formal impeachment inquiry." 

 

Veronica EscobarVeronica EscobarGabby Giffords participating in gun violence town hall in El Paso following mass shooting Congressional Hispanic Caucus calls for answers on Mississippi ICE raids Consoler in Chief like Biden is the perfect antidote to a Divider in Chief like Trump MORE (Texas)

“I personally feel like we cannot tolerate this level of obstruction, that if we do, then we have lowered the bar to the point where any criminal can be president of the United States and that should be unacceptable to all of us,” tweeted Escobar, a Judiciary Committee member. “I believe we need to begin an impeachment inquiry.”

 

Adriano EspaillatAdriano de Jesus Espaillat CabralCongressional Hispanic Caucus calls for answers on Mississippi ICE raids Congressional Hispanic Caucus members call for diversity within the Fed Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony MORE (N.Y.)

"We cannot slow down – the American people deserve the truth, and @realDonaldTrump deserves to be held accountable for his actions. #Impeach" Espaillat tweeted on May 29 after Mueller delivered his statement. Espaillat also previously co-sponsored articles of impeachment against Trump in 2017.

 

Dwight Evans (Pa.)

"The heavily redacted #MuellerReport reveals and details repeated disturbing conduct by the president, & it shouldn't go unnoticed — an impeachment vote would begin the process & allow House Judiciary to have broader investigative availability, which is certainly warranted!" Evans tweeted.

 

Marcia Fudge (Ohio)

Fudge signed on to Tlaib's resolution on June 6. She also co-sponsored articles of impeachment against Trump in 2017.

 

Ruben GallegoRuben GallegoCongressional Hispanic Caucus calls for answers on Mississippi ICE raids Congressional Hispanic Caucus members call for diversity within the Fed Overnight Energy: Warren edges past Sanders in poll of climate-focused voters | Carbon tax shows new signs of life | Greens fuming at Trump plans for development at Bears Ears monument MORE (Ariz.)

"No president in the history of our country has ever been subject to as many credible allegations of illegal conduct as Donald Trump. Given the serious nature of these crimes, and the president's refusal to cooperate with congressional investigations, it's time for the House of Representatives to begin an impeachment inquiry," Gallego said in a House floor speech on July 11.

 

John GaramendiJohn Raymond GaramendiHouse Democrats inch toward majority support for impeachment Trump bashes Mueller for 'ineptitude,' slams 'sick' Democrats backing impeachment Pelosi denies she's 'trying to run out the clock' on impeachment MORE (Calif.) 

“The Mueller testimony is one further step in the process. The next step, in my opinion, is the undertaking of an impeachment inquiry, a formal process of inquiry following up on the Mueller testimony and other issues that have been brought to our attention. And then we will see where we go with an impeachment, a formal resolution. An impeachment inquiry is comparable to grand jury proceedings," Garamendi said in a statement after Mueller's July 24 testimony.
 

Jesús "Chuy" Garcia (Ill.)

“After careful consideration and deliberation, I’ve come to the conclusion that the House of Representatives must execute its constitutionally mandated responsibility and begin a formal inquiry,” Garcia told WBEZ in an interview on May 28.

 

Jimmy GomezJimmy GomezHere are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Lawmakers call for 'time out' on facial recognition tech Amazon shareholders vote down limits on facial recognition software MORE (Calif.)

"We will NOT stand idly by as this administration runs roughshod over the Constitution. I have voted TWICE to start debate on articles of impeachment. And I would do it again in a heartbeat," Gomez tweeted after Mueller's statement.

 

Al Green (Texas)

Green has been a vocal supporter of impeachment since 2017. He forced two House floor votes on impeachment in 2017 and 2018 while Republicans held the majority and has threatened to force a third.

 

Raúl Grijalva (Ariz.)

"President Trump is not exonerated, and his administration is deliberately misleading the American people about the findings of the Special Counsel. If this isn’t a reason for an #ImpeachmentInquiryNow, I don’t know what is," Grijalva, the Natural Resources Committee chairman, tweeted hours after Mueller's statement.

 

Deb HaalandDebra HaalandWarren tells Native Americans: 'I have made mistakes' Warren unveils Native American policy plan Booker eyes farm conservation, reforestation and wetlands restoration in climate plan MORE (N.M.)

"There is growing evidence of impeachable offenses and I believe we have a responsibility to defend our Constitution and our Democracy. We must move forward with an impeachment inquiry. The President is not above the law," Haaland said in a statement Aug. 14.

 

Denny HeckDennis (Denny) Lynn HeckExclusive: Guccifer 2.0 hacked memos expand on Pennsylvania House races Heck enjoys second political wind Incoming lawmaker feeling a bit overwhelmed MORE (Wash.)

"There is no question that the President encouraged, welcomed and benefited from the interference of a foreign adversary in our 2016 election. Furthermore, he has both refused to fully acknowledge it occurred and even suggested he might welcome such interference again," Heck said in a statement on July 28, days after special counsel Robert Mueller testified before the House Intelligence panel, of which he's a member. “The President has also engaged in an aggressive and active cover-up of the effort to reveal all the facts. 

“Accordingly, I support initiation of an impeachment inquiry by the House Judiciary Committee and will support measures to accomplish this when Congress returns to Washington, D.C.”

 

Brian Higgins (N.Y.)

Higgins mentioned the defiance of subpoenas by government employees in backing an impeachment inquiry.

“Beyond the verified instances of obstruction detailed by the Special Counsel, over the past several months, the President has stonewalled every Congressional request and forbid government employees from complying with congressional subpoenas," he said in a June 19 statement. "These actions further seek to obstruct the transparent and lawful government Americans deserve, representing a deliberate irreverence for the Constitution that forces the House to exercise its impeachment responsibility as set forth in Article 1.”

 

Jim HimesJames (Jim) Andres HimesRising star Ratcliffe faces battle to become Trump's intel chief Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony Live coverage: Mueller testifies before Congress MORE (Conn.) 

“The time has come for the House of Representatives to begin an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. From the moment of his inauguration, this President has shown contempt for the truth, has attacked our institutions, and has ignored the Constitution he swore to defend," Himes, a member of the Intelligence Committee, said in a statement on June 24. At the same time, Himes made sure to praise Pelosi: "My motive today is not to pressure the Speaker of the House, whose leadership in this Congress has been superb."

 

Jared Huffman (Calif.)

“The Constitution created our impeachment authority for exactly this kind of circumstance. And it's really damaging to the country and to our institutions if we punt on something like this,” Huffman told "PBS NewsHour" after the Mueller report became public. Huffman is a co-sponsor of Tlaib’s resolution.

 

Sheila Jackson LeeSheila Jackson LeeJackson Lee: 'Racism is a national security threat' Most oppose cash reparations for slavery: poll Poll: Most Americans oppose reparations MORE (Texas)

Jackson Lee, a Judiciary Committee member, introduced a resolution in May that would authorize the panel to "investigate whether sufficient grounds exist" for moving forward with impeachment. She also voted in favor of Green's impeachment resolution on July 17.

 

Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalLawmakers urge DNC to name Asian American debate moderator Medicare for all: fears and facts House Democrats urge Trump to end deportations of Iraqis after diabetic man's death MORE (Wash.)

“We are now at the point where we must begin an impeachment inquiry. I don't say that lightly. We've taken every step we can w/subpoenas and witnesses,” tweeted Jayapal, a Judiciary Committee member and Progressive Caucus leader.

 

Bill KeatingWilliam (Bill) Richard KeatingWHIP LIST: The 130 House Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry Bottom Line Foreign Affairs chairman: US military intervention in Venezuela 'not an option' MORE (Mass.)

"The Mueller report reveals several instances of obstruction of justice, certainly enough to move forward with an impeachment investigation," Keating wrote in a series of tweets on Aug. 22.

 

Robin KellyRobin Lynne KellyTo combat domestic terrorism, Congress must equip law enforcement to fight rise in white supremacist attacks Democratic lawmakers support Bustos after DCCC resignations Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment MORE (Ill.)

Kelly said she supports opening an "impeachment investigation" but acknowledged that it's unlikely Trump will actually be impeached. “The publication of the Mueller report has only strengthened my resolve and proved that the President obstructed justice. I support efforts to open an impeachment investigation but I know we don’t have the votes in the GOP-controlled Senate. We need to keep investigating, keep showing the facts to the American people and ‘impeach’ him at the ballot box in 2020," Kelly said, according to WBEZ.

 

Joe KennedyJoseph (Joe) Patrick KennedyJoseph Kennedy mulling primary challenge to Markey in Massachusetts Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment House passes annual intelligence bill MORE (Mass.)

"It's a dark day for our country when its Commander-in-Chief is accused of high crimes. But after reading the Mueller report in full, reviewing the facts and consulting with legal experts, I believe Congress has a responsibility to act decisively," Kennedy said in a statement on June 28.

 

Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaKing incites furor with abortion, rape and incest remarks San Jose mayor proposes mandatory liability insurance for gun owners Democrats give cold shoulder to Warren wealth tax MORE (Calif.)

"I support the impeachment inquiry," Khanna told MSNBC on Aug. 13. "Now we're in an inquiry and I support [Nadler] on that."

 

Dan Kildee (Mich.)

Kildee, a chief deputy whip, came out in favor of an impeachment inquiry after Trump told ABC News he'd accept dirt on political rivals from foreign entities.

"[T]he president's actions have taken us to a moment where I believe Congress must open an impeachment inquiry to defend the rule of law," Kildee said in a statement. "And the President's recent comments welcoming and encouraging foreign interference in our elections were absolutely chilling. The President's statements are not only unpatriotic, they are illegal."

 

Derek KilmerDerek Christian KilmerHouse Democrats inch toward majority support for impeachment Wave of Washington state lawmakers call for impeachment proceedings against Trump No. 3 Senate Democrat calls for House to begin impeachment proceedings against Trump MORE (Wash.)

"The incidents of obstruction of justice cited in the Mueller report are too serious to be dismissed based on politics, party biases, or the fear of a predicted outcome," Kilmer tweeted on July 28. "I support the House of Representatives beginning an impeachment inquiry into President Trump."

 

Ann KirkpatrickAnn KirkpatrickTwo Democrats vow to press forward on Trump impeachment Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment The House Democrats who voted to kill impeachment effort MORE (Ariz.)

Kirkpatrick, a GOP target in 2020, said on July 16 that she decided to support an impeachment inquiry after speaking with constituents and legal scholars, reading the Mueller report, and watching Trump administration officials defy subpoenas. "I know impeachment is risky, but allowing this president to defy the law is even more risky," Kirkpatrick said in a House floor speech.

 

Annie Kuster (N.H.)

"The Special Counsel reiterated that he did not exonerate the President, and that because of Department of Justice Policy, he could not charge the President with a crime even if he had the evidence to do so," Kuster said in a statement two days after Mueller's July 24 testimony. "Given the Special Counsel's testimony, and the evidence outlined in his report, I support the House of Representatives opening a formal inquiry."

 

Jim LangevinJames (Jim) R. LangevinBipartisan panel to issue recommendations for defending US against cyberattacks early next year Rising star Ratcliffe faces battle to become Trump's intel chief Overnight Defense: Trump says he doesn't need exit strategy with Iran | McConnell open to vote on Iran war authorization | Senate panel advances bill to restrict emergency arms sales MORE (R.I.)

"After careful reflection & interaction with my constituents, I believe we must move forward with an impeachment inquiry in President Trump’s actions. The American people deserve the full truth, and they deserve a President who respects the rule of law," Langevin tweeted on Aug. 21.

 

Rick LarsenRichard (Rick) Ray LarsenTwo Democrats vow to press forward on Trump impeachment Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment WHIP LIST: The 130 House Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry MORE (Wash.)

Larsen said in a statement on July 18, a day after Trump's rally where the crowd chanted "send her back" in reference to a freshman congresswoman, that the president's statement "degrading the dream of citizenship" led him to endorse impeachment. "The president has no concept of this widely and tightly held belief of Americans. His comments do not protect the concept of U.S. citizenship. They undermine it. He should not be the president of the United States." Larsen also voted in favor of Green's impeachment resolution on July 17.

 

Brenda Lawrence (Mich.)

Lawrence cited Trump's efforts to stonewall congressional investigations and Mueller's findings on Trump attempting the undermine the special counsel probe, as well as the president indicating in an ABC News interview that he'd accept dirt from a foreign entity on a political opponent. "That coupled with his recent admission during a network interview that he sees nothing wrong with accepting assistance from a foreign entity, leaves me no choice but to now request that this body proceed with the process of conducting an impeachment inquiry," Lawrence said on June 18, according to the Detroit News.

 

Barbara Lee (Calif.)

The California progressive, who is a member of the Democratic leadership team, co-sponsored Tlaib's measure on May 23.

 

Andy Levin (Mich.)

Levin tweeted on June 15 that “I have watched the Trump administration’s stonewalling of our oversight activities with growing frustration.”

“I have concluded that, absent an impeachment inquiry, even if our appeals to the courts continue to succeed, they will follow a timeline far too slow to meet the needs of the American people for truth and justice,” Levin wrote.

 

Mike Levin (Calif.)

Levin, who represents a swing district in California, tweeted on July 26 that he "can't ignore the corruption and obstruction we witness every day from President Trump." 

"I now support an impeachment inquiry in order to get the truth for my constituents," he added.

 

Ted Lieu (Calif.)

Lieu echoed other fellow Judiciary Committee members in endorsing an inquiry. “This inquiry could lead to impeachment, or it could lead to nothing. But I think if McGahn doesn’t show, we have to at least start it,” Lieu told The Washington Post.

 

Alan Lowenthal (Calif.)

"Congress must hold [Trump] accountable. I believe the time has come to consider an impeachment inquiry," Lowenthal tweeted a day after Mueller's statement.

 

Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyWhite House won't move forward with billions in foreign aid cuts Pelosi warns Mnuchin to stop 'illegal' .3B cut to foreign aid Appropriators warn White House against clawing back foreign aid MORE (N.Y.)

The House Appropriations Committee chairwoman came out in support of an impeachment inquiry on July 31, nearly two weeks after she voted with 94 fellow Democrats to go forward with an effort to impeach Trump.

“Since he took office, House Democrats have been aggressively and thoughtfully investigating potentially illegal activity by the President and others on his campaign and in his administration. The administration has done all it can to withhold information, leading to various legal efforts to secure testimony and evidence," she wrote in a statement.

 

Ben Ray Luján (N.M.)
 
"I support moving forward with an impeachment inquiry, which will continue to uncover the facts for the American people and hold this president accountable," Luján, the fourth-ranking House Democrat, said in a statement on Aug. 19.

 

Tom Malinowski (N.J.)

Malinowski, who represents a competitive swing district, told NBC News that he now supports an impeachment inquiry. "I’ve come to think that it is warranted at this point given what appears to be across-the-board defiance of congressional oversight and the rule of law by the administration," he said. 

 

Carolyn Maloney (N.Y.)

“I’ve been thinking about impeachment for a long time. It is not something that Congress, or our country, can undertake lightly - it’s a terrible, weighty thing," Maloney said at a rally on June 15. “After carefully reviewing evidence laid out in the Mueller Report, after attending numerous hearings, after listening to the concerns of my constituents, and after doing as much soul-searching as I’ve ever done in my life - it is my inescapable conclusion that the House of Representatives must open an impeachment inquiry against the President of the United States."

 

 
A spokesman confirmed to The Hill that Matsui supports launching an impeachment inquiry. Matsui had voted in favor of Green's impeachment resolution on July 17.
 
 
Betty McCollum (Minn.)

"I fully expect the responsible House committees to expedite their investigations and, as soon as possible, formally draft articles of impeachment. It is my belief that the House of Representatives has an absolute obligation under the Constitution to hold a president accountable for illegal conduct, and that includes Mr. Trump," McCollum said in a statement after Mueller delivered his public statement on May 29.

 

Jim McGovern (Mass.)

McGovern, the chairman of the powerful House Rules Committee, endorsed impeachment after Mueller’s comments. “We’re beyond talking about this in terms of political implications. We have to do what’s right,” McGovern told WGBH. McGovern previously voted in favor of articles of impeachment offered by Green during the last Congress. He now chairs the committee closely aligned with leadership that controls how legislation is considered on the House floor. 

 

Grace MengGrace MengLawmakers urge DNC to name Asian American debate moderator Reuniting families is a critical step in diplomacy with North Korea Appetite for Democratic term limits fizzling out MORE (N.Y.)

Meng, vice chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, voiced support for launching an impeachment inquiry on July 30, nearly two weeks after she voted with 94 fellow Democrats to go forward with an effort to impeach Trump. Meng had joined Green and 93 Democrats to accuse Trump of inflaming racial tensions following a recent episode in which he urged four female lawmakers of color to “go back” to other countries.

"In this regard, I believe it is my duty to seek out truth for the sake of my constituents and our nation, and thereby call for an impeachment inquiry," she said.

 

Gwen Moore (Wis.)

"President Trump has repeatedly demonstrated manifest disrespect for the office he holds, Congress, and the American people," Moore said, according to The Associated Press. "I have long said that Trump should resign. Impeachment is not something that any of us take lightly, but we cannot shrink from our responsibilities either."

 

Seth Moulton (Mass.)

The presidential candidate backs an impeachment investigation. “I'm not calling for a vote on impeachment today. We don't have all the facts yet. But we should be getting those facts and making them transparent for the American people,” Moulton told MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell.

 

Debbie Mucarsel-Powell (Fla.)

Mucarsel-Powell is both a freshman who flipped a swing district last fall and a Judiciary Committee member. "This President has engaged in behavior that we have not seen, nor would we have allowed, from the other 44 men who have occupied that office. This is why I support opening an impeachment inquiry into the President," she said in a statement on June 21.

 

Jerry NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerPoll: Majority wants Trump out, but not through impeachment Second Democrat representing Trump district backs impeachment GOP memo deflects some gun questions to 'violence from the left' MORE (N.Y.)

Nadler, the Judiciary Committee chairman, said in August that his panel is conducting an investigation to determine whether to pursue articles of impeachment against Trump. "This is formal impeachment proceedings," Nadler said in an interview with CNN's Erin Burnett.

 

Grace NapolitanoGraciela (Grace) Flores NapolitanoLatina leaders: 'It's a women's world more than anything' The Hill's 12:30 Report: Muller testimony dominates Washington The Hill's Morning Report — Mueller day finally arrives MORE (Calif.)

A spokesman for Napolitano confirmed the California Democrat supports opening an impeachment inquiry. She also signed on to Tlaib's resolution on June 4.

 

Joseph Neguse (Colo.)

“The findings detailed in the Special Counsel’s report, and the Administration’s pattern of wholesale obstruction of Congress since the report’s release, make clear that it is time to open an impeachment inquiry,” Neguse, a Judiciary Committee member, tweeted after McGahn was a no-show.

 

Donald NorcrossDonald W. NorcrossHere are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment WHIP LIST: The 130 House Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry Biden, Harris lead in 2020 endorsements MORE (N.J.)

"I remain in favor of the impeachment process. The future of our country is at stake. No one is above the law," Norcross tweeted on June 25.

 

Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezThe Memo: Dangers loom for Trump on immigration Students retreating from politics as campuses become progressive playgrounds Former GOP Rep. Jason Lewis says he'll challenge Tina Smith in Minnesota MORE (N.Y.)

Ocasio-Cortez signed on to Tlaib's resolution after the Justice Department released a partially redacted version of Mueller's report on Russia's election interference that laid out 10 instances of Trump potentially obstructing justice.

“It is just as politicized a maneuver to not impeach in the face of overwhelming evidence as it is to impeach w/o cause,” Ocasio-Cortez tweeted on May 21.

“Just as what happens in the House doesn’t control Senate, what happens in the Senate shouldn’t control the House,” she added.

 

Ilhan Omar (Minn.)

“We must begin impeachment proceedings and investigate if the president committed impeachable offenses,” Omar tweeted after the Mueller report's release. She also co-sponsored Tlaib's resolution.

 

Chris PappasChristopher (Chris) Charles PappasSecond Democrat representing Trump district backs impeachment Assault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress The 11 House Dems from Trump districts who support assault weapons ban MORE (N.H.)

"After weeks of careful consideration and after countless conversations with my constituents, I believe it is imperative that Congress continues its oversight work by opening an impeachment inquiry," he said in a video.

 

Bill PascrellWilliam (Bill) James PascrellBottom Line Democrats denounce Trump's attack on Cummings: 'These are not the words of a patriot' Two Democrats vow to press forward on Trump impeachment MORE (N.J.)

"The sitting President has disgraced his office and our nation beyond measure. The sitting President has corrupted our institutions for profit. The sitting President has used his tenure to divide our people and increase fear and hatred of our neighbors. The sitting President and his adjutants have evaded and obstructed legitimate attempts of oversight of their debasement, including over the current executive's tax filings and financial entanglements. The sitting President's crimes and obstruction of justice have not abated but accelerated because of failure to constrain him. It is only Congress that can finally hold him to account. We must do this by commencing impeachment hearings of the President," Pascrell said in a statement on July 18, one day after voting in favor of impeachment.

 

Donald Payne (D-N.J.)

A spokesman said Aug. 1 that Payne supports an immediate move to impeachment, based on evidence complied in the Mueller report. 

 

Scott PetersScott H. PetersDuncan Hunter gets another GOP challenger Hillicon Valley: Facebook won't remove doctored Pelosi video | Trump denies knowledge of fake Pelosi videos | Controversy over new Assange charges | House Democrats seek bipartisan group on net neutrality House Democrats seek bipartisan working group on net neutrality MORE (Calif.)

"[N]ow we are assigned another solemn task by the Constitution and by current events. We need to begin impeachment hearings," Peters tweeted on June 26. "Some argue impeachment poses a political risk for Democrats. They say Republicans will claim Trump was vindicated regardless of the outcome. That gives Americans too little credit. I trust them to discern which of us did our patriotic duty and who played to political cynicism."

 

Chellie Pingree (Maine)

“As dozens of serious investigations into President Trump and his business interests are underway in state + federal courts, it is in the public interest that Congress continue its own investigations in the face of unprecedented obstruction and move toward an impeachment inquiry,” Pingree tweeted after Mueller’s public appearance.

 

Mark Pocan (Wis.)

“Stonewalling Congress on witnesses and the unredacted Mueller report only enhances the President’s appearance of guilt, and as a result, he has pushed Congress to a point where we must start an impeachment inquiry,” tweeted Pocan, a leader of the Congressional Progressive Caucus.

 

Katie Porter (Calif.)

“After weeks of study, deliberation and conversations with Orange County families, I’ve decided to support an impeachment investigation of the president,” Porter said in a video statement she sent out on Twitter.

 

Ayanna Pressley (Mass.)

Pressley is also a co-sponsor of Tlaib's resolution. “There's a lack of moral fortitude and fitness to even be in this office,” Pressley told Boston Public Radio. “I think what we have seen that is unredacted in this report relative to examples of obstruction of justice also gives us the legal grounds.”

 

David PriceDavid Eugene PriceRepublican lawmakers on why they haven't read Mueller report: 'Tedious' and 'what's the point?' Democrats advance more spending bills, defying Trump budget requests Ahead of infrastructure talks, House Democrats release 7B bill MORE (N.C.)

Price came out in support of an impeachment inquiry on Aug. 13, writing, "This will build upon the investigations of the President's grave offenses already underway, giving these inquiries focus and the maximum ability to obtain information in the face of the president's stonewalling and resistance."

 

Mike Quigley (Ill.)

“The President’s unacceptable obstruction and his abuses of power have left Congress only one option to fulfill our Constitutional responsibilities: We must open an impeachment inquiry,” Quigley tweeted the day after Mueller’s appearance. “What the Special Counsel was saying is that the ball is in Congress’s court.”

 

Jamie Raskin (Md.)

Raskin, a member of the Judiciary Committee and the Oversight and Reform Committee, told The Washington Post that “the logic of an impeachment inquiry is pretty overwhelming at this point.” 

 

Kathleen Rice (N.Y.)

Rice said on Twitter that "Congress has a moral obligation to put our politics aside and take action," calling on lawmakers to begin impeachment hearings. The New York lawmaker had opposed Pelosi's bid for Speakership.

 

Cedric Richmond (La.)

A spokeswoman confirmed to The Hill that Richmond, a Judiciary Committee member and former Congressional Black Caucus chairman, "does support starting an impeachment inquiry."

 

Harley RoudaHarley Edwin RoudaSecond Democrat representing Trump district backs impeachment Democrats call for Senate to return to vote on gun reform after two deadly mass shootings The House Democrats who voted to kill impeachment effort MORE (Calif.)

Rouda, another freshman in a swing district, confirmed to The Hill on June 27 that he now supports launching an impeachment inquiry. He had previously said he'd back it by the end of June if the Trump administration continued stonewalling Democratic investigations.

 

Lucille Roybal-AllardLucille Roybal-AllardMigrants in US border detention centers won't receive flu vaccine DHS wants to shift money to immigration enforcement: report Latina leaders: 'It's a women's world more than anything' MORE (Calif.)

Roybal-Allard voted in favor of Green's impeachment resolution on July 17. Her office confirmed that she supports an impeachment inquiry to determine if there are grounds for removing the president.

 

Bobby Rush (Ill.)

“Congressman Rush believes that President Trump should be impeached,” a spokesperson for Rush told WBEZ. “Congress has a responsibility to protect the constitutional foundation of our government with respect for the laws of this great nation. We must not forget that no one is above the law.”

 

Tim Ryan (Ohio)

“When you think that the president has committed crimes — and I’ve read the Mueller report and think he obstructed [justice] on multiple occasions — we have a responsibility," Ryan, who is running for president, said during a CNN town hall on June 2.

 

Mary Gay ScanlonMary Gay ScanlonFour House Judiciary members say they will 'move forward' with impeachment Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment GOP leader, Ocasio-Cortez give boost to lawmaker pay hike MORE (Pa.)

“No one is above the law. The time has come to start an impeachment inquiry because the American people deserve to know the truth and to have the opportunity to judge the gravity of the evidence and charges leveled against the president,” Scanlon, the Judiciary Committee's vice chairwoman, said in a statement after McGahn declined to show up for a hearing. 

 

Jan Schakowsky (Ill.)

“I believe that the House of Representatives should open an impeachment inquiry,” Schakowsky, a Pelosi ally, said in a video posted to social media on June 19.

 

Brad SchneiderBradley (Brad) Scott SchneiderDemocrats press FBI, DHS on response to white supremacist violence Trump: Jews who vote Democrat show 'lack of knowledge or great disloyalty' Netanyahu praises House for passing anti-BDS resolution MORE (Ill.)

“These are serious charges that demand further investigation. I previously believed that Congress’s oversight and investigative efforts—through hearings, subpoenas, and lawsuits—were the appropriate vehicle to uncover the truth. Regrettably, it is clear that the Administration has little regard for the Constitution, is unwilling to provide any information to Congress, and is seeking to play out the clock," Schneider said in a press release announcing his support for an impeachment inquiry on Aug. 22.

 

Kim SchrierKimberly (Kim) Merle SchrierSecond Democrat representing Trump district backs impeachment House Democrats inch toward majority support for impeachment Wave of Washington state lawmakers call for impeachment proceedings against Trump MORE (Wash.)

"The people of #WA08 elected me to protect their health care & our environment. Those will always remain my focus while I have the privilege of serving them in Congress," Schrier tweeted July 28. "They also elected me uphold the Constitution. So, I am formally calling for an impeachment inquiry."

 

José Serrano (N.Y.)

Serrano announced his support for an inquiry in a July 29 statement, writing, "I make this statement with a heavy heart. As one of the few current Members of the House who served during the last impeachment proceedings in 1998, I am particularly aware of the wrenching nature of this constitutional process."

"It puts deep strain on our institution and on our democracy. To take steps towards impeachment is to understand that the threat to our nation is so great, and the ability to find recourse elsewhere is so slim, that we have no other choice. In my opinion, we have now reached that point."

 

Brad Sherman (Calif.)

A spokeswoman says Sherman supports an impeachment inquiry.

 

Adam SmithDavid (Adam) Adam SmithWarren's pledge to avoid first nuclear strike sparks intense pushback Landmark US-Russia arms control treaty poised for final blow Young Democrats look to replicate Ocasio-Cortez's primary path MORE (Wash.)

Smith chairs the House Armed Services Committee. “Congressman Smith believes we must move forward with an impeachment inquiry,” Shana Chandler, Smith’s chief of staff, said, according to The Seattle Times. “President Trump has continued his efforts to obstruct justice and undermine Congress as a coequal branch of government and proceeding with an impeachment inquiry — the first step in a lengthy and difficult process — is the best way to demand accountability from this administration.”

 

Jackie Speier (Calif.)

“I believe that an inquiry into impeachment is required at this point in time,” Speier, a member of the Oversight and Reform Committee, told CNN's “New Day.”

 

Greg Stanton (Ariz.)

Stanton, a Judiciary Committee member, endorsed opening an impeachment inquiry a day after Mueller broke his silence. "It is time for the House of Representatives to move to the next stages of holding the President accountable, including the extraordinary step of opening an impeachment inquiry. This is a conclusion I reached only recently, and not one I reached lightly," Stanton said in a statement.

 

Eric Swalwell (Calif.)

"Congress has no choice: we must begin an impeachment inquiry against @realDonaldTrump. He has invited the Russians to again sabotage our elections. And he has obstructed (& obstructs) justice. Time to be held accountable. Our democracy is worth saving," Swalwell tweeted June 13 after Trump told ABC News he'd accept dirt on political rivals from foreign governments. Swalwell is a Judiciary Committee member and is running for president. 

 

Mark TakanoMark Allan TakanoCollege should profit students and taxpayers — even at for-profit schools Lawmakers urge DNC to name Asian American debate moderator Steyer group targeting 12 congressional Democrats over impeachment MORE (Calif.) 

Takano said he had concluded that the Mueller investigation found that Trump welcomed Russia's help in the 2016 election and obstructed Mueller's investigation.

"That is why today, with solemnity, in accordance with the fundamental duties outlined for me, a Member of Congress, in Article I of the Constitution, I am announcing my support for formally launching impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump," he said in an Aug. 22 video statement to constituents.

 

Bennie Thompson (Miss.)

The House Homeland Security Committee chairman said after Mueller spoke that "I support impeachment."

"The special counsel did not give any indication that the President is innocent," Thompson said in a statement. "Therefore, it is time for Congress to perform its oversight duties." Thompson previously voted twice in favor of articles of impeachment from Green in 2017 and 2018 on the House floor.

 

Dina TitusAlice (Dina) Costandina TitusHouse Democrats inch toward majority support for impeachment Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Key endorsements: A who's who in early states MORE (Nev.)

"My decision isn't based on my disagreements with the President's policies or my disapproval of his temperament, though I have both," Titus said on July 29. "I'm calling for an impeachment inquiry because of the mounting evidence that Donald Trump has repeatedly broken the law to protect his own interests.

 

Rashida Tlaib (Mich.)

In addition to her impeachment inquiry resolution, Tlaib drew attention on her first day as a member of Congress in January for pledging to a crowd of supporters that “we're going to impeach the motherf---er.”

 

Paul Tonko (N.Y.)

"After careful review of the evidence and testimony currently available, and in service to my oath, it is my judgment that Congress needs to accept the baton being handed to us by now former Special Counsel Mueller and open an impeachment inquiry to more fully assess the Constitutional implications of seemingly criminal actions by the President and his campaign, and to determine whether formal impeachment charges need to be filed," Tonko wrote in a series of tweets five days after Mueller's on-camera statement.

 

Norma Torres (Calif.)

"I think there is enough evidence in front of us to move forward," Torres told The Washington Post after the Mueller report's release. 

 

Lori TrahanLori A. TrahanHouse Democrats inch toward majority support for impeachment Trump bashes Mueller for 'ineptitude,' slams 'sick' Democrats backing impeachment Pelosi denies she's 'trying to run out the clock' on impeachment MORE (Mass.)

Trahan announced her support for an impeachment inquiry following Mueller's testimony before Congress on July 24. She also voted in favor of Green's impeachment resolution a week earlier.

"Mueller's message to the American people today was clear: his report did not exonerate the president, and that there is ample evidence that the president broke the law by repeatedly engaging in efforts to obstruct the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election," Trahan said in a statement.

 

Lauren UnderwoodLauren UnderwoodThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump hews to NRA on guns and eyes lower taxes Second Democrat representing Trump district backs impeachment Hillicon Valley: Capital One faces investigation over massive breach | DHS warns of cyber vulnerability in small aircraft | Senate bill would ban 'addictive' social media features MORE (Ill.)

"The petition Chairman Nadler filed on July 26 clearly states that the Judiciary Committee is investigating whether to recommend Articles of Impeachment, essentially an impeachment inquiry. I support this investigation," Underwood, a freshman who flipped a GOP-held seat last fall, said in a statement on Aug. 20. 
 

Juan Vargas (Calif.)

Vargas told The Hill recently that he supports the impeachment inquiry. "I think we should start the impeachment process. … I think it gets us to a place where we can get this information, and then frankly be able to make a determination."

 

Filemon Vela (Texas)

Vela has signed on to Tlaib's resolution calling for an impeachment inquiry.

 

Nydia Velázquez (N.Y.)

Velázquez cited the findings in Mueller's investigation, as well as Trump's comments to ABC News expressing openness to accepting dirt from foreign governments on his political opponents. "Today, given the facts available, I believe an impeachment inquiry is the only path forward," Velazquez said in a video posted to her Twitter account on June 20. Velázquez chairs the House Small Business Committee and previously voted in favor of Green's articles of impeachment.

 

Maxine Waters (Calif.)

Waters was one of the first Democrats to call for Trump's impeachment. Waters told CNN in a recent interview that Trump has “done everything that one could even think of to be eligible for impeachment.”

 

Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchOvernight Health Care: Oversight chair plans to call drug executives to testify on costs | Biden airs anti-'Medicare for All' video | House panel claims Juul deliberately targeted kids Mueller agrees investigation did not 'fail to turn up evidence of conspiracy' Live coverage: Mueller testifies before Congress MORE (Vt.)

"On January 20, 2017, President-elect Donald Trump stood on the West Front of the United States Capitol, placed his left hand on two Bibles, raised his right hand, and swore to 'preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.' I have concluded that he has failed to honor that solemn oath which, in my view, merits impeachment under our Constitution," he said in a statement.

 

Jennifer WextonJennifer Lynn WextonSecond Democrat representing Trump district backs impeachment The Hill's Morning Report - Progressives, centrists clash in lively Democratic debate Progressives face steep odds in ousting incumbent Democrats MORE (Va.)

Wexton, who represents Virginia’s moderate suburban 10th District, announced her support for beginning an impeachment inquiry on July 30. “As a former prosecutor, it is clear to me given the conduct by the president detailed in the Mueller Report and Director Mueller’s recent testimony before Congress that — were he not a sitting president — Donald Trump would be indicted on charges for obstruction of justice," she said. 

“After much deliberation, I believe the time has come for the House of Representatives to assert our constitutional responsibility and begin an impeachment inquiry.”

 

John Yarmuth (Ky.)

“I've been there a long time,” Yarmuth told The Hill when confirming he supports launching an impeachment inquiry, noting he co-sponsored an impeachment resolution in the previous Congress when Republicans controlled the House.

 

Updated on Aug. 22 at 3:06 p.m.