Republicans attempt to amend retirement savings bill to include anti-BDS language

Twelve House Democrats broke party ranks and voted in favor of a Republican motion to recommit that would have added language preventing companies that support the “boycott, divestment, sanctions” movement (BDS) from receiving tax subsidies to a bill related to retirement savings.

While the GOP’s attempts to amend the bill at the eleventh hour ultimately failed in a 200-222 vote on Thursday, there was an uptick in the number of Democrats willing to join them in utilizing the procedural tool. Democratic leaders had earlier this year called on their caucus to reject Republicans’ procedural motions as a blanket policy. 

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Democratic Reps. Anthony Brindisi (N.Y.), Joe CunninghamJoseph CunninghamDemocratic lawmaker fires back after NRCC mocks him for getting marriage counseling Here are the House Democrats who aren't backing Trump impeachment inquiry Here are the Democrats who aren't co-sponsoring an assault weapons ban MORE (S.C.), Josh GottheimerJoshua (Josh) GottheimerThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by USAA — Ex-Ukraine ambassador testifies Trump pushed for her ouster No Labels' fight against partisanship The Hill's Morning Report - US coastline readies for Hurricane Dorian to make landfall MORE (N.J.), Kendra HornKendra Suzanne HornLiberals keep foot on the gas on impeachment Here are the House Democrats who aren't backing Trump impeachment inquiry Centrist Democrats fret over impeachment gamble MORE (Okla.), Chrissy Houlahan (Pa.), Elaine LuriaElaine Goodman LuriaPelosi-backed group funding ads for vulnerable Democrats amid impeachment inquiry Mass shootings have hit 158 House districts so far this year CNN faces backlash for video highlighting white congresswomen as impeachment leaders MORE (Va.) Seth MoultonSeth Moulton2020 Presidential Candidates Rep. Joe Kennedy has history on his side in Senate bid Mass shootings have hit 158 House districts so far this year MORE (Mass.), Max RoseMax RoseHillicon Valley: FCC approves T-Mobile-Sprint merger | Dems wrangle over breaking up Big Tech at debate | Critics pounce as Facebook's Libra stumbles | Zuckerberg to be interviewed by Fox News | Twitter details rules for political figures' tweets Democratic lawmakers press for white supremacist groups to be labeled foreign terrorist organizations Bottom Line MORE (N.Y.), Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinHouse Dems introduce bill to fight social media disinformation Polls flash warning signs for Trump on impeachment Pelosi-backed group funding ads for vulnerable Democrats amid impeachment inquiry MORE (Mich.), Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerHouse Dems introduce bill to fight social media disinformation Bipartisan lawmakers who visited Syrian border slam Trump's 'rash decision' Pelosi-backed group funding ads for vulnerable Democrats amid impeachment inquiry MORE (Va.), Jeff Van DrewJeff Van DrewThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by USAA — Ex-Ukraine ambassador testifies Trump pushed for her ouster Schiff becomes key Democrat in battle with Trump Centrist Democrats urge caution over impeachment inquiry MORE (N.J.) and Susan WildSusan WildThe Hill's Morning Report - Congress returns: What to expect Hopes dim for passage of Trump trade deal Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids — Senate panel advances bipartisan package on health costs | Grassley, Wyden in talks on deal to limit drug price increases | Court asks if blue states have standing in ObamaCare suit MORE (Pa.) all opted support the measure.

The amendment would have required pro-BDS businesses that are “engaged in boycott activity against Israel” to disclose their activity in their annual tax return.

Republicans have been aggressive in their messaging efforts on anti-Semitism, often highlighting controversial remarks made by members across the aisle that have been critical of U.S.-Israel relations.

“I stand here before the House today to get an affirmative vote that we stand together against the anti-Semitic notion of the BDS Movement. The boycott -- The BDS movement is an effort to weaponize the world's economy against one simple state — one state, the great state of Israel — and the Jewish people,” Rep. Patrick McHenryPatrick Timothy McHenryHouse committee pressing Zuckerberg to testify on digital currency Libra House passes bill to protect cannabis industry access to banks, credit unions Manufacturing group leads coalition to urge Congress to reauthorize Ex-Im Bank MORE (R-N.C.) said on the floor.

“They are trying to weaponize our economy, our dollars against our only ally in the Middle East that's a democracy. This is an effort for us today to say that we'll stand against this movement.”

Democrats blasted the move as a political ploy to splinter the Democratic caucus.

"We know the drill on MTR's [motions to recommit], how they are being used to heap scorn on complicated arguments, the demagogue arguments that should be taken up in a separate space," House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard NealRichard Edmund NealBusiness groups keep pressure for trade deal amid impeachment fight Overnight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — House Dems change drug pricing bill to address progressive concerns | Top Republican rejects Dem proposal on surprise medical bills | Vaping group launches Fox News ad blitz Top Republican rejects Democratic chairman's approach to stopping surprise medical bills MORE (D-Mass.) shot back.  

"You know what else this is about? For those of us who came through the wards and precincts of American politics, there is a difference in politics between being cute and being clever. This is cute, this is not clever."

Two GOP members, Reps. Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieO'Rourke gun confiscation talk alarms Democrats Scalise blasts Democratic legislation on gun reforms Airports already have plenty of infrastructure funding MORE (Ky.) and Justin AmashJustin AmashAmash: Clinton's attack on Gabbard will 'drive many people into the arms' of Trump Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — House passes resolution rebuking Trump over Syria | Sparks fly at White House meeting on Syria | Dems say Trump called Pelosi a 'third-rate politician' | Trump, Graham trade jabs House passes resolution rebuking Trump over Syria pullout MORE (Mich.), voted against the measure during the procedural vote.

Republicans have successfully utilized the tool — which allows them to force vulnerable members across the aisle to take difficult votes — twice this year, the first to amend a bill on Yemen to include language condemning anti-Semitism and a second time to amend a bill aimed at strengthening background checks on gun purchase to include language requiring that Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) get notified when someone who entered the country illegally attempts to purchase a gun.