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Second Republican blocks disaster aid bill's passage in House

A second House Republican blocked passage of a disaster aid bill on Tuesday, increasing the odds that lawmakers will have to wait until the chamber reconvenes from recess next week to send the measure to President TrumpDonald TrumpWhite House denies pausing military aid package to Ukraine Poll: 30 percent of GOP voters believe Trump will 'likely' be reinstated this year Black Secret Service agent told Trump it was offensive to hold rally in Tulsa on Juneteenth: report MORE.

Rep. Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieHouse Democrat: Republicans 'treating Capitol Police like shit' were 'the most scared' during riot 14 Republicans vote against making Juneteenth a federal holiday Congress tiptoes back to normality post-pandemic MORE (R-Ky.) objected to an attempt by Democrats to clear a $19.1 billion disaster aid package by unanimous consent during a pro forma session.

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Lawmakers first tried on Friday during another pro forma session to pass the legislation by unanimous consent, since most House members had left for the Memorial Day recess on Thursday.

But freshman Rep. Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene Roy14 Republicans vote against making Juneteenth a federal holiday 21 Republicans vote against awarding medals to police who defended Capitol The Hill's Morning Report - Biden-Putin meeting to dominate the week MORE (R-Texas) objected to its passage on Friday, citing the $19 billion price tag and lack of funds requested by the Trump administration to help agencies dealing with migrants at the southern border. 

During Tuesday's session, Rep. Sanford Bishop (D-Ga.) offered a request to pass the disaster aid package by unanimous consent, while Rep. Jennifer WextonJennifer Lynn WextonLate Capitol Police officer's family urges Congress to agree to Jan. 6 commission Administration withdraws Trump-era proposal to loosen protections for transgender homeless people Trump the X-factor in Virginia governor race MORE (D-Va.) presided.

But Massie objected, saying Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOvernight Energy: Lake Mead's decline points to scary water future in West | White House leads opposition to raising gas tax | Biden taps ex-New Mexico lawmaker for USDA post Trump against boycotting Beijing Olympics in 2022 House Democrats' campaign arm raises almost million in May MORE (D-Calif.) "should have called a vote on this bill before sending every member of Congress on recess for 10 days."

House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerBiden signs Juneteenth bill: 'Great nations don't ignore their most painful moments' House passes political spending, climate change corporate disclosures bill House to vote Wednesday on making Juneteenth a federal holiday MORE (D-Md.), who was also on the House floor, urged Republicans — without success — not to object.

"Millions of people are at risk," Hoyer said. 
The House is scheduled to reconvene on Thursday at 4:30 p.m. for another pro forma session, where Democrats plan to again try to pass the disaster aid bill by unanimous consent. But given the continued resistance from conservatives, it's more likely to be sent to Trump's desk by a roll call vote next week.
 
The House isn't scheduled to come back into session for roll call votes until next Monday, June 3.
 
Roy doubled down on Tuesday after facing blowback from fellow Republicans, including those who represent disaster-ravaged states, for blocking the legislation's passage. 

"Last Friday, the American people were at work on Friday. The House was on recess and @SpeakerPelosi tried to jam through a bill WITHOUT A VOTE that is $19 billion, not paid for, and without any effort to address the emergency border supplemental @RussVought45 requested," Roy tweeted.

Like Roy, Massie also quickly drew ire from his own party for blocking the bill's passage.

"This is yet another example of politicians putting their own self-interest ahead of the national interest. It’s pathetic that some members have chosen this moment to grandstand & get into the national headlines," tweeted Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.).
 
President Trump had objected to additional funding for Puerto Rico, but lawmakers reached a deal to include $600 million in nutrition assistance for the island territory in the disaster aid package.
 
The Senate then quickly passed the legislation 85-8 on Thursday before adjourning for the recess.

The package also includes $5 million for a study of the disaster nutrition assistance provided to Puerto Rico in 2017.

Beyond assistance for Puerto Rico, it further includes funding to address the effects of Hurricanes Florence and Michael, as well as recent wildfires. It also extends the National Flood Insurance Program through September. 

Fellow Republicans publicly panned Roy's move last week, including lawmakers representing areas that stood to receive disaster aid funding. Rep. Jody HiceJody Brownlow HiceHouse Democrat: Republicans 'treating Capitol Police like shit' were 'the most scared' during riot 21 Republicans vote against awarding medals to police who defended Capitol Georgia GOP censures state official who criticized Trump MORE (R-Ga.) tweeted that "our farmers need aid today," while Rep. Austin ScottJames (Austin) Austin ScottHouse Republican takes part in hearing while driving car Overnight Defense: Tim Kaine moves to claw back war powers authority | Study on sexual harassment and assault in the military Commissioners tasked with scrubbing Confederate base names sworn-in at first meeting MORE (R-Ga.) lamented that "political games over disaster assistance continue."

Scott went after Massie on Tuesday as well, tweeting that "unfortunately, more clowns showed up today to once again delay disaster relief for the states and farmers devastated by the storms of 2018. This bill will pass the House next week, and President Trump will sign it. #GA08"

This report was updated at 3:23 p.m.