Second Republican blocks disaster aid bill's passage in House

A second House Republican blocked passage of a disaster aid bill on Tuesday, increasing the odds that lawmakers will have to wait until the chamber reconvenes from recess next week to send the measure to President TrumpDonald John TrumpUSPS warns Pennsylvania mail-in ballots may not be delivered in time to be counted Michael Cohen book accuses Trump of corruption, fraud Trump requests mail-in ballot for Florida congressional primary MORE.

Rep. Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieMassie plans to donate plasma after testing positive for COVID-19 antibodies Gaetz set to endorse primary opponent of fellow Florida GOP lawmaker The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the Air Line Pilots Association - Progress slow on coronavirus bill MORE (R-Ky.) objected to an attempt by Democrats to clear a $19.1 billion disaster aid package by unanimous consent during a pro forma session.

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Lawmakers first tried on Friday during another pro forma session to pass the legislation by unanimous consent, since most House members had left for the Memorial Day recess on Thursday.

But freshman Rep. Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyRepublicans face worsening outlook in battle for House The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden builds big lead in battleground Florida Internal Democratic poll shows tight race in key Texas House district MORE (R-Texas) objected to its passage on Friday, citing the $19 billion price tag and lack of funds requested by the Trump administration to help agencies dealing with migrants at the southern border. 

During Tuesday's session, Rep. Sanford Bishop (D-Ga.) offered a request to pass the disaster aid package by unanimous consent, while Rep. Jennifer WextonJennifer Lynn WextonRepublicans face worsening outlook in battle for House Ocasio-Cortez rejects Yoho apology as disingenuous Democratic lawmakers launch 'Mean Girls'-inspired initiative to promote face masks MORE (D-Va.) presided.

But Massie objected, saying Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSusan Collins asks postmaster general to address delays of 'critically needed mail' Trump says he'd sign bill funding USPS but won't seek changes to help mail voting On The Money: Senate leaves until September without coronavirus relief agreement | Weekly jobless claims fall below 1 million for first time since March | Trump says no Post Office funding means Democrats 'can't have universal mail-in voting' MORE (D-Calif.) "should have called a vote on this bill before sending every member of Congress on recess for 10 days."

House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerLawmakers of color urge Democratic leadership to protect underserved communities in coronavirus talks The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump to Democratic negotiators: 'They know my phone number' House will be out of session for additional week in September MORE (D-Md.), who was also on the House floor, urged Republicans — without success — not to object.

"Millions of people are at risk," Hoyer said. 
The House is scheduled to reconvene on Thursday at 4:30 p.m. for another pro forma session, where Democrats plan to again try to pass the disaster aid bill by unanimous consent. But given the continued resistance from conservatives, it's more likely to be sent to Trump's desk by a roll call vote next week.
 
The House isn't scheduled to come back into session for roll call votes until next Monday, June 3.
 
Roy doubled down on Tuesday after facing blowback from fellow Republicans, including those who represent disaster-ravaged states, for blocking the legislation's passage. 

"Last Friday, the American people were at work on Friday. The House was on recess and @SpeakerPelosi tried to jam through a bill WITHOUT A VOTE that is $19 billion, not paid for, and without any effort to address the emergency border supplemental @RussVought45 requested," Roy tweeted.

Like Roy, Massie also quickly drew ire from his own party for blocking the bill's passage.

"This is yet another example of politicians putting their own self-interest ahead of the national interest. It’s pathetic that some members have chosen this moment to grandstand & get into the national headlines," tweeted Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.).
 
President Trump had objected to additional funding for Puerto Rico, but lawmakers reached a deal to include $600 million in nutrition assistance for the island territory in the disaster aid package.
 
The Senate then quickly passed the legislation 85-8 on Thursday before adjourning for the recess.

The package also includes $5 million for a study of the disaster nutrition assistance provided to Puerto Rico in 2017.

Beyond assistance for Puerto Rico, it further includes funding to address the effects of Hurricanes Florence and Michael, as well as recent wildfires. It also extends the National Flood Insurance Program through September. 

Fellow Republicans publicly panned Roy's move last week, including lawmakers representing areas that stood to receive disaster aid funding. Rep. Jody HiceJody Brownlow HiceQAnon backer Marjorie Taylor Greene wins Georgia GOP runoff QAnon supporter in Georgia heads into tight GOP runoff GOP lawmakers comply with Pelosi's mask mandate for House floor MORE (R-Ga.) tweeted that "our farmers need aid today," while Rep. Austin ScottJames (Austin) Austin ScottLobbying world Lawmakers warn Pentagon against reduction of US forces in Africa 5 Republicans who could replace Isakson in Georgia's Senate race MORE (R-Ga.) lamented that "political games over disaster assistance continue."

Scott went after Massie on Tuesday as well, tweeting that "unfortunately, more clowns showed up today to once again delay disaster relief for the states and farmers devastated by the storms of 2018. This bill will pass the House next week, and President Trump will sign it. #GA08"

This report was updated at 3:23 p.m.