House approves much-delayed $19.1B disaster aid bill

House approves much-delayed $19.1B disaster aid bill
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The House on Monday passed a $19.1 billion disaster relief package, finally sending legislation to the White House that had been repeatedly blocked by conservatives over the Memorial Day recess.

The legislation was approved in a 354-58 vote.

The House sought to move the bill three times by unanimous consent over the last week, but the vote was blocked by a different conservative Republican each time.

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GOP Reps. Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyOh, Canada: Should the US emulate Canada's National Health Service? Lawmaker-linked businesses received PPP loans House Republicans urge White House to support TSA giving travelers temperature checks MORE (Texas), Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieBiggs, Massie call on Trump to remove troops from Afghanistan Massie wins House GOP primary despite Trump call to be ousted from party Rep. Massie called out by primary opponent for previous display of Confederate flag MORE (Ky.) and John RoseJohn Williams RoseFrom state agriculture departments to Congress: Our farmers need the USMCA Trump signs long-awaited .1B disaster aid bill 58 GOP lawmakers vote against disaster aid bill MORE (Tenn.) each blocked the unanimous consent vote, arguing there should be a full debate on the measure.

Roy, a former staffer to Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOh, Canada: Should the US emulate Canada's National Health Service? Trump tweets his support for Goya Foods amid boycott Trump says he'll sign order with 'road to citizenship' for DACA recipients MORE (R-Texas), argued the spending should be offset by other spending cuts and said he was concerned about adding to the national debt.

“The American people send their representatives to Washington to represent them. They deserve to see how we vote. While I'm happy the Speaker chose to go back to regular procedure, I am still troubled we're poised to spend $19 billion that is not paid for when we are racking up $100 million an hour in national debt,” he said on the floor Monday.

The measure includes funding for communities hit by various natural disasters across the country. It also includes $900 million in aid to Puerto Rico, funding that was initially opposed by President TrumpDonald John TrumpDeSantis on Florida schools reopening: 'If you can do Walmart,' then 'we absolutely can do schools' NYT editorial board calls for the reopening of schools with help from federal government's 'checkbook' Mueller pens WaPo op-ed: Roger Stone 'remains a convicted felon, and rightly so' MORE as being too much.

The measure passed the Senate in an 85-8 vote in late May.

A number of lawmakers during Monday’s debate criticized Congress’s failure to pass the bill last week.

“Today we're rejecting the political stunts and grandstanding that have made it difficult to deliver much-needed disaster relief to families and communities across America,” said House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyHouse Democrats push for resuming aid to Palestinians in spending bill House panel approves bill funding WHO, paring back abortion restrictions Democrats sidestep budget deal by seeking 0B in emergency spending MORE (D-N.Y.) ahead of the vote.

The three conservatives who had blocked the bill also took heat from their fellow Republicans.

House Appropriations Committee ranking member Kay GrangerNorvell (Kay) Kay GrangerHouse panel approves bill funding WHO, paring back abortion restrictions On The Money: Deficit rises to record .7 trillion amid pandemic: CBO | Democrats sidestep budget deal by seeking 0B in emergency spending | House panel advances spending bill with funding boost to IRS House panel advances spending bill with funding boost to IRS MORE (R-Texas) accused them of pulling a “political stunt.” Rep. Austin ScottJames (Austin) Austin ScottLobbying world Lawmakers warn Pentagon against reduction of US forces in Africa 5 Republicans who could replace Isakson in Georgia's Senate race MORE (R-Ga.) last week called them “clowns” in a tweet.