House approves much-delayed $19.1B disaster aid bill

House approves much-delayed $19.1B disaster aid bill
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The House on Monday passed a $19.1 billion disaster relief package, finally sending legislation to the White House that had been repeatedly blocked by conservatives over the Memorial Day recess.

The legislation was approved in a 354-58 vote.

The House sought to move the bill three times by unanimous consent over the last week, but the vote was blocked by a different conservative Republican each time.

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GOP Reps. Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoySenate scraps plan to force second stopgap vote ahead of shutdown On The Money: Senate scraps plan to force second shutdown vote | Trump tax breaks for low-income neighborhoods draw scrutiny | McConnell rips House Dems for holding up trade deal Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Senate eyes sending stopgap spending bill back to House | Sondland delivers bombshell impeachment testimony | Pentagon deputy says he didn't try to block official's testimony MORE (Texas), Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieGOP lawmaker says newly-released Butina was jailed due to 'Russophobia' O'Rourke gun confiscation talk alarms Democrats Scalise blasts Democratic legislation on gun reforms MORE (Ky.) and John RoseJohn Williams RoseFrom state agriculture departments to Congress: Our farmers need the USMCA Trump signs long-awaited .1B disaster aid bill 58 GOP lawmakers vote against disaster aid bill MORE (Tenn.) each blocked the unanimous consent vote, arguing there should be a full debate on the measure.

Roy, a former staffer to Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzLawmakers spar over surveillance flight treaty with Russia Senators voice support for Iran protesters but stop short of taking action Prisons chief: FBI investigating whether 'criminal enterprise' played role in Epstein death MORE (R-Texas), argued the spending should be offset by other spending cuts and said he was concerned about adding to the national debt.

“The American people send their representatives to Washington to represent them. They deserve to see how we vote. While I'm happy the Speaker chose to go back to regular procedure, I am still troubled we're poised to spend $19 billion that is not paid for when we are racking up $100 million an hour in national debt,” he said on the floor Monday.

The measure includes funding for communities hit by various natural disasters across the country. It also includes $900 million in aid to Puerto Rico, funding that was initially opposed by President TrumpDonald John TrumpFive takeaways from the Democratic debate As Buttigieg rises, Biden is still the target Leading Democrats largely pull punches at debate MORE as being too much.

The measure passed the Senate in an 85-8 vote in late May.

A number of lawmakers during Monday’s debate criticized Congress’s failure to pass the bill last week.

“Today we're rejecting the political stunts and grandstanding that have made it difficult to deliver much-needed disaster relief to families and communities across America,” said House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyOn The Money: House passes monthlong stopgap | Broader spending talks stall | Judge orders Democrats to give notice if they request Trump's NY tax returns | Progressives ramp up attacks on private equity House passes stopgap as spending talks stall Key GOP senator: 'We need a breakthrough' on spending talks MORE (D-N.Y.) ahead of the vote.

The three conservatives who had blocked the bill also took heat from their fellow Republicans.

House Appropriations Committee ranking member Kay GrangerNorvell (Kay) Kay GrangerCongress hunts for path out of spending stalemate This week: House kicks off public phase of impeachment inquiry Lawmakers dismiss fresh fears of another government shutdown MORE (R-Texas) accused them of pulling a “political stunt.” Rep. Austin ScottJames (Austin) Austin Scott5 Republicans who could replace Isakson in Georgia's Senate race Georgia GOP abuzz about Senate vacancy House approves much-delayed .1B disaster aid bill MORE (R-Ga.) last week called them “clowns” in a tweet.