Lee Zeldin responds to Ilhan Omar accusing him of 'bigotry'

Lee Zeldin responds to Ilhan Omar accusing him of 'bigotry'

Rep. Lee ZeldinLee ZeldinBolton returns to political group after exiting administration Lobbying World New York Times editor deletes and apologizes for past 'offensive' tweets MORE (R-N.Y.) accused Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarGOP Senate candidate said Republicans have 'dual loyalties' to Israel Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to meet with lawmakers | Big tech defends efforts against online extremism | Trump attends secretive Silicon Valley fundraiser | Omar urges Twitter to take action against Trump tweet Omar asks Twitter what it's doing in response to Trump spreading 'lies that put my life at risk' MORE (D-Minn) of trying to "poison" a newly formed caucus after she accused him of "bigotry" in an endorsement of the caucus.

Zeldin announced the newly formed Congressional Black-Jewish Caucus at an American Jewish Committee (AJC) global forum with Reps. Debbie Wasserman SchultzDeborah (Debbie) Wasserman SchultzDemocrats walk tightrope in fight over Trump wall funds Parkland father: Twitter did not suspend users who harassed me using name of daughter's killer Hillicon Valley: Senate Intel releases election security report | GOP blocks votes on election security bills | Gabbard sues Google over alleged censorship | Barr meets state AGs on tech antitrust concerns MORE (D-Fla.) and Brenda Lawrence (D-Mich.).

AJC is a global Jewish advocacy organization.

Zeldin, who launched the caucus with two House Democrats, said the group is aimed at "building bridges." 

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"Be helpful, accurate & better. Unite; don't divide or try to poison like this latest personal attack. This is bigger than us & we have to be better than this," Zeldin tweeted Thursday.

The tweet is in response to Omar's earlier one where she clarified that her endorsement of the caucus was not an endorsement of "Zeldin's bigotry." 

Zeldin was among the lawmakers who called out some controversial remarks Omar made that he and others said were anti-Semitic. He went on to be one of 23 Republicans to vote against an anti-Semitism bill in March, arguing it did not go far enough by not identifying Omar.