Lee Zeldin responds to Ilhan Omar accusing him of 'bigotry'

Lee Zeldin responds to Ilhan Omar accusing him of 'bigotry'

Rep. Lee ZeldinLee ZeldinLawmakers prep ahead of impeachment hearing House approves two-state resolution in implicit rebuke of Trump House moves ahead on long-stalled resolution supporting two states for Israelis and Palestinians MORE (R-N.Y.) accused Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarSanders, Omar to hit campaign trail in New Hampshire House approves two-state resolution in implicit rebuke of Trump Al Green calls for including Trump's 'racism' in impeachment articles MORE (D-Minn) of trying to "poison" a newly formed caucus after she accused him of "bigotry" in an endorsement of the caucus.

Zeldin announced the newly formed Congressional Black-Jewish Caucus at an American Jewish Committee (AJC) global forum with Reps. Debbie Wasserman SchultzDeborah (Debbie) Wasserman SchultzOn The Money: Trump signs short-term spending bill to avoid shutdown | Pelosi casts doubt on USMCA deal in 2019 | California high court strikes down law targeting Trump tax returns Wasserman Schultz makes bid for House Appropriations Committee gavel Overnight Defense: Erdoğan gets earful from GOP senators | Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract decision in court | Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families MORE (D-Fla.) and Brenda Lawrence (D-Mich.).

AJC is a global Jewish advocacy organization.

Zeldin, who launched the caucus with two House Democrats, said the group is aimed at "building bridges." 

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"Be helpful, accurate & better. Unite; don't divide or try to poison like this latest personal attack. This is bigger than us & we have to be better than this," Zeldin tweeted Thursday.

The tweet is in response to Omar's earlier one where she clarified that her endorsement of the caucus was not an endorsement of "Zeldin's bigotry." 

Zeldin was among the lawmakers who called out some controversial remarks Omar made that he and others said were anti-Semitic. He went on to be one of 23 Republicans to vote against an anti-Semitism bill in March, arguing it did not go far enough by not identifying Omar.