Amash hits Trump and his allies: They are 'trying to excuse' his obstruction efforts

Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashSupreme Court set to deliver ruling on census citizenship question Democrats seek to ban federal spending at Trump businesses DC theatre to host 11-hour reading of the Mueller report MORE (R-Mich.) blasted President TrumpDonald John TrumpConway defends herself against Hatch Act allegations amid threat of subpoena How to defuse Gulf tensions and avoid war with Iran Trump says 'stubborn child' Fed 'blew it' by not cutting rates MORE and his allies on Friday, asserting they are "trying to excuse" the president’s efforts to potentially obstruct special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerKamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump Schiff says Intel panel will hold 'series' of hearings on Mueller report MORE’s investigation.

Amash, who last month became the only Republican to call for Trump's impeachment, said in a lengthy Twitter thread that "with Mueller’s report now out, the White House no longer has anything positive to say about Mueller and his team."

“The president and his allies are instead trying to excuse Trump’s efforts to obstruct the entire investigation into Russian election interference by alleging problems with elements of it and claiming, without basis, that they undermine Mueller’s obstruction analysis," Amash wrote.

The Michigan Republican, a vocal Trump critic, took particular aim at Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrThe Hill's Morning Report - Crunch time arrives for 2020 Dems with debates on deck Supreme Court set to deliver ruling on census citizenship question Trump: 'I think I win the election easier' if Democrats launch impeachment proceedings MORE for initially saying Mueller had cleared Trump on the topic of obstruction before the special counsel's report had been released.

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Mueller later maintained that he could not reach a prosecutorial decision on the issue, citing Justice Department guidelines saying a sitting president cannot be indicted. He said instead that Congress has authority to conduct obstruction probes.

Trump had initially reacted positively to the Mueller report after Barr’s announcement characterizing the special counsel's findings, though the president was quick to condemn Mueller once his report was actually released.

Amash noted in his thread Friday that "Mueller’s report is damning for the president" and maintained that "[i]f Barr’s letter had accurately reflected the report, the White House would not have reacted positively."

Since the report’s release, Trump and his allies on Capitol Hill have gone on the offensive against Mueller in an attempt to cast him and his team as conflicted and questioning his ability to be an objective investigator.

Mueller cited 10 “episodes” of times Trump may have obstructed probes into Russian meddling in the 2016 election but declined to bring charges against him. Still, he maintained at a press conference last month that his report did not exonerate the president.

“If we had had confidence that the president clearly did not commit a crime, we would have said so,” Mueller said. “We did not, however, make a determination as to whether the president did commit a crime.” 

Amash has emerged as one of the most vocal Republican critics of Trump, raising eyebrows last month when he said he believed the president engaged in “impeachable conduct,” citing several examples Mueller laid out in his report of potentially obstructive behavior.

Amash’s criticism has made him a virtual pariah within the GOP. Though he says some Republicans privately sympathize with his comments, the conservative House Freedom Caucus, of which Amash is a member, voted last month to condemn his remarks and Trump called him a “loser" and "total lightweight."