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Amash breaks with GOP in Barr, Ross contempt vote

Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashRepublicans eye primaries in impeachment vote Michigan GOP lawmaker says he's 'strongly considering' impeachment Newly sworn in Republican House member after Capitol riot: 'I regret not bringing my gun to D.C.' MORE (R-Mich.), the only Republican in Congress to come out in favor of starting impeachment proceedings against President TrumpDonald TrumpUS, South Korea reach agreement on cost-sharing for troops Graham: Trump can make GOP bigger, stronger, or he 'could destroy it' Biden nominates female generals whose promotions were reportedly delayed under Trump MORE, broke with his party again on Wednesday with a committee vote to hold Attorney General William BarrBill BarrPolitics in the Department of Justice can be a good thing Majority of Republicans say 2020 election was invalid: poll Biden administration withdraws from Connecticut transgender athlete case MORE and Commerce Secretary Wilbur RossWilbur Louis RossFormer Trump officials find tough job market On The Money: Retail sales drop in latest sign of weakening economy | Fast-food workers strike for minimum wage | US officials raise concerns over Mexico's handling of energy permits US officials raise concerns over Mexico's handling of energy permits MORE in contempt.

Amash joined Democrats to vote in favor of the contempt resolution, which was in relation to subpoenaed documents on the Trump administration’s addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

Amash had also sided with Democrats in votes over which amendments to add to the contempt resolution.

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The Republican stepped down from the conservative Freedom Caucus this week after going public with his impeachment comments. The group is typically pro-Trump.

Amash had not voted in favor of a House resolution on Tuesday that authorized House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerHillary Clinton brings up 'Freedom Fries' to mock 'cancel culture' House sets vote for George Floyd police reform bill Jim Jordan calls for House Judiciary hearing on 'cancel culture' MORE (D-N.Y.) to go to court to enforce congressional subpoenas.

The lawmaker tweeted that he opposed the resolution because it “shifts to leadership the power to authorize future enforcement lawsuits, further centralizing the House’s authority and undermining the institution.”