Amash breaks with GOP in Barr, Ross contempt vote

Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashDemocrats defend Afghan withdrawal amid Taliban advance Vietnam shadow hangs over Biden decision on Afghanistan Kamala Harris and our shameless politics MORE (R-Mich.), the only Republican in Congress to come out in favor of starting impeachment proceedings against President TrumpDonald TrumpNorth Korea conducts potential 6th missile test in a month Kemp leading Perdue in Georgia gubernatorial primary: poll US ranked 27th least corrupt country in the world MORE, broke with his party again on Wednesday with a committee vote to hold Attorney General William BarrBill BarrThe Hill's Morning Report - US warns Kremlin, weighs more troops to Europe Jan. 6 committee chair says panel spoke to William Barr William Barr's memoir set for release in early March MORE and Commerce Secretary Wilbur RossWilbur Louis RossMomentum builds to prohibit lawmakers from trading stocks Census memo notes 'unprecedented' Trump administration meddling: report Holding defiant Trump witnesses to account, Jan. 6 committee carries out Congress's constitutional role MORE in contempt.

Amash joined Democrats to vote in favor of the contempt resolution, which was in relation to subpoenaed documents on the Trump administration’s addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

Amash had also sided with Democrats in votes over which amendments to add to the contempt resolution.

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The Republican stepped down from the conservative Freedom Caucus this week after going public with his impeachment comments. The group is typically pro-Trump.

Amash had not voted in favor of a House resolution on Tuesday that authorized House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerDemocrats ask for information on specialized Border Patrol teams Andrew Cuomo attorney says AG investigation was 'shoddy,' outcome was 'predetermined' Democrats quietly explore barring Trump from office over Jan. 6  MORE (D-N.Y.) to go to court to enforce congressional subpoenas.

The lawmaker tweeted that he opposed the resolution because it “shifts to leadership the power to authorize future enforcement lawsuits, further centralizing the House’s authority and undermining the institution.”