Amash breaks with GOP in Barr, Ross contempt vote

Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashAmash says he's happy not feeling 'bound to a particular party' Amash on Syria: Trump's not ending anything Trump says House Democrats 'unfortunately' have the votes to impeach MORE (R-Mich.), the only Republican in Congress to come out in favor of starting impeachment proceedings against President TrumpDonald John TrumpWarren defends, Buttigieg attacks in debate that shrank the field Five takeaways from the Democratic debate in Ohio Democrats debate in Ohio: Who came out on top? MORE, broke with his party again on Wednesday with a committee vote to hold Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrGiuliani says he won't comply with subpoenas from Democrats Barr bemoans 'moral upheaval' that has brought 'suffering and misery' Trump threatens to sue Schiff and Pelosi MORE and Commerce Secretary Wilbur RossWilbur Louis RossDemocrats inch closer to issuing subpoenas for Interior, EPA records Overnight Energy: Dems subpoena Perry in impeachment inquiry | EPA to overhaul rules on lead contamination tests | Commerce staff wrote statement rebuking weather service for contradicting Trump Commerce staff drafted statement rebuking weather service for contradicting Trump's hurricane predictions MORE in contempt.

Amash joined Democrats to vote in favor of the contempt resolution, which was in relation to subpoenaed documents on the Trump administration’s addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

Amash had also sided with Democrats in votes over which amendments to add to the contempt resolution.

The Republican stepped down from the conservative Freedom Caucus this week after going public with his impeachment comments. The group is typically pro-Trump.

Amash had not voted in favor of a House resolution on Tuesday that authorized House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerBarr to speak at Notre Dame law school on Friday The 13 House Democrats who back Kavanaugh's impeachment Ignore the hype — this is not an impeachment inquiry MORE (D-N.Y.) to go to court to enforce congressional subpoenas.

The lawmaker tweeted that he opposed the resolution because it “shifts to leadership the power to authorize future enforcement lawsuits, further centralizing the House’s authority and undermining the institution.”