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Democrats take aim at Trump policies by passing $1T spending package

Democrats take aim at Trump policies by passing $1T spending package
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Democrats on Wednesday muscled through a nearly $1 trillion spending bill that attempts to block President TrumpDonald TrumpUS, South Korea reach agreement on cost-sharing for troops Graham: Trump can make GOP bigger, stronger, or he 'could destroy it' Biden nominates female generals whose promotions were reportedly delayed under Trump MORE's policies on climate change, abortion and immigration, underscoring Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump White House associate tied to Proud Boys before riot via cell phone data Greene sounds off on GOP after Hill story 'Bloody Sunday' to be commemorated for first time without John Lewis MORE's (D-Calif.) argument that the House can work as a check on the administration.

Lawmakers passed the spending package in a 226-203 vote that fell largely along party lines. Seven Democrats voted against the measure, as did all Republicans.

The legislation includes the two largest government spending bills — one for Defense and one covering Labor, Health and Human Services and Education. It also covers funding bills for foreign operations and energy and water.

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The measure takes aim at a slew of Trump's funding goals, starting with a rejection of his budget request, which proposed deep cuts to the State Department, cuts to the National Institutes of Health, the elimination of advanced energy research and a massive increase in defense spending.

“This bill rejects the administration’s unacceptable budget request and irresponsible policies and, rather, strives to uphold many bipartisan congressional priorities,” said House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Rep. Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyTrump seeks to freeze .4 billion of programs in final week of presidency This week: Trump's grip on Hill allies faces test Trump signs .3T relief, spending package MORE (D-N.Y.) ahead of the floor vote.

The Democratic bill would eliminate what's known as the Mexico City policy, which blocks the U.S. from funding foreign groups that promote abortion, and it would prevent withdrawal from the 2015 Paris climate accord. Another provision would fund research into the causes of gun violence.

The measure also includes language that would block funds from being used to ban transgender people from serving in the military and prevent the sale of nuclear technology to Saudi Arabia.

The seven Democrats who voted against the measure were Reps. Denny HeckDennis (Denny) Lynn HeckExclusive: Guccifer 2.0 hacked memos expand on Pennsylvania House races Heck enjoys second political wind Incoming lawmaker feeling a bit overwhelmed MORE (Wash.), Ben McAdams (Utah), Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezProgressives' majority delusions politically costly Manchin: Every member of the Senate thinks minimum wage should increase Progressives won't oppose bill over limits on stimulus checks MORE (N.Y.), Ilhan OmarIlhan Omar Omar: 'Disappointing' that we're 'sending money to less people than the Trump administration' House approves George Floyd Justice in Policing Act House Democrats' ambitious agenda set to run into Senate blockade MORE (Minn.), Collin PetersonCollin Clark PetersonSix ways to visualize a divided America On The Trail: The political losers of 2020 OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump admin to sell oil leases at Arctic wildlife refuge before Biden takes office |Trump administration approves controversial oil testing method in Gulf of Mexico | Rep. Scott wins House Agriculture Committee gavel MORE (Minn.), Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyPressley says image of Black custodial staff cleaning up Capitol after Jan. 6 riot 'haunts' her DeJoy apologizes for mail delays while defending Postal Service changes DeJoy set for grilling by House Oversight panel MORE (Mass.) and Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibSinema pushes back on criticism of her vote against minimum wage Progressives push White House to overturn wage ruling Six ways to visualize a divided America MORE (Mich.).

Republicans slammed the spending package, saying it includes provisions that will invite a veto from Trump.

“This package has become a partisan vehicle, under-funding defense priorities, over-funding non-defense programs, carrying poison pills, and delaying action to address the crisis at our southern border,” said Rep. Kay GrangerNorvell (Kay) Kay GrangerMarjorie Taylor Greene's delay tactics frustrate GOP Here are the House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump Growing number of lawmakers test positive for COVID-19 after Capitol siege MORE (Texas), the top Republican on the Appropriations Committee.

While the legislation is unlikely to become law in its current form, it nonetheless gives Pelosi more leverage in spending talks with Senate Republicans, who have not passed any government funding bills for fiscal 2020.

Many of the provisions in the House bill are unlikely to make it through the Senate, which has lagged in producing its own spending measures. Senators say they are waiting until the House, Senate and White House agree on overall spending caps.

Pelosi hosted a meeting Wednesday afternoon to discuss raising the statutory caps, which could pave the way for the Senate to start passing its own appropriations bills. But no agreement was reached between congressional leaders and senior administration officials.

Without a deal, Congress and the White House may face a heavy fiscal lift in the fall. The deadline for raising the debt ceiling is expected to hit around that time, and missing it would lead to a U.S. debt default that would shock global financial markets.

Even if a deal is reached, the Senate will be well behind the House, which began consideration of a second, five-bill package covering $383 billion in spending on Wednesday afternoon. Democrats expect to complete passage of all 12 annual spending bills by the end of the month.

Wednesday's House-passed measure gives Pelosi an opportunity to argue that congressional Democrats are standing up to Trump at a time when dozens of caucus members are calling for initiating an impeachment inquiry against the president.

When asked about impeachment, Pelosi frequently pivots to talk about legislative accomplishments.

“I want to get back to our legislation, because that is what the American people elected us to do,” she said last week when the topic of impeachment came up.

Chris Mills Rodrigo contributed.

Updated at 5:37 p.m.