House sends Trump border aid bill after Pelosi caves to pressure from moderates

The House on Thursday passed a bipartisan Senate bill that would address the crisis at the southern border, dealing a major blow to Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiHouse Democrat pushes for censuring Trump in closed-door meeting Trump: I don't have a racist bone in my body Ocasio-Cortez responds to fresh criticism from Trump MORE (D-Calif.) and progressives who had pushed for stronger protections for migrant children.

Ninety-five Democrats opposed the measure in a 305-102 vote. The legislation now heads to the White House, where President TrumpDonald John TrumpEsper sidesteps question on whether he aligns more with Mattis or Trump Warren embraces Thiel label: 'Good' As tensions escalate, US must intensify pressure on Iran and the IAEA MORE is expected to sign the $4.6 billion package into law.

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Pelosi and her leadership team had initially intended to hold a Thursday vote to amend the Senate-passed bill to include language that would implement safety and care standards for law enforcers working with migrants — provisions pursued by liberals that were in the previous House-passed bill.

But moderate Democrats in groups like the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus and the Blue Dog Coalition put pressure on Pelosi to take up the Senate bill immediately.

Rep. Josh GottheimerJoshua (Josh) GottheimerProblem Solvers Caucus co-chair calls Trump comments about progressive congresswomen 'totally unacceptable' Trump's tweets unify a fractured Democratic Party Bipartisan group of lawmakers invites colleagues to tour DC's Holocaust museum MORE (D-N.J.), co-chair of the Problem Solvers Caucus, informed Pelosi he had rallied enough support against the changes backed by progressives, resulting in Pelosi losing significant leverage in her fight for changes to the Senate measure.

The eventual vote on the Senate bill sparked outrage from left-leaning members like Congressional Progressive Caucus Co-Chairman Mark PocanMark William PocanOn the USMCA, Pelosi can't take yes for an answer Overnight Defense: House approves 3 billion defense bill | Liberal sweeteners draw progressive votes | Bill includes measure blocking Trump from military action on Iran House approves defense bill after adding liberal sweeteners MORE (D-Wis.). 

“Since when did the Problem Solvers Caucus become the Child Abuse Caucus? Wouldn't they want to at least fight against contractors who run deplorable facilities? Kids are the only ones who could lose today,” he tweeted.

Progressive firebrand Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezGeorge Conway calls Trump a 'racist president' in new op-ed House Democrats introduce resolution condemning Trump for 'racist' comments Trump's family separation policy has taken US to 'lowest depth possible,' says former immigration lawyer MORE (D-N.Y.) argued that Democrats should have fought harder to strike a deal with the Senate that would have provided more Democratic wins.

"The problem right now and the question at hand is Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - House to vote to condemn Trump tweet GOP put on the back foot by Trump's race storm Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA —Biden unveils health care plan | Proposal pitches subsidies, public option | Biden vows if you like your health insurance, 'you can keep it' | Sanders protests planned Philadelphia hospital closure MORE sent us a bill and we're putting a big check mark on it instead of even trying to negotiate. ... What Mitch McConnell is doing is relying on the time pressure of recess," she said on CNN.

Top Republicans advocated for the passage of the Senate bill ahead of the vote, with dozens of GOP lawmakers saying on the House floor that it should be passed by unanimous consent.

Seven conservatives — GOP Reps. Justin AmashJustin AmashSC Republican Mark Sanford considering primary challenge to Trump Democrats erupt over Trump attacks Juan Williams: GOP in a panic over Mueller MORE (Mich.), Andy Biggs (Ariz.), Mo BrooksMorris (Mo) Jackson BrooksOvernight Defense: Woman accusing general of sexual assault willing to testify | Joint Chiefs pick warns against early Afghan withdrawal | Tensions rise after Iran tries to block British tanker Conservatives ask Barr to lay out Trump's rationale for census question House sends Trump border aid bill after Pelosi caves to pressure from moderates MORE (Ala.), Louie GohmertLouis (Louie) Buller GohmertJudiciary issues blitz of subpoenas for Kushner, Sessions, Trump associates Conservatives ask Barr to lay out Trump's rationale for census question Gohmert calls Mueller an 'anal opening' ahead of testimony MORE (Texas), Paul GosarPaul Anthony GosarThe 27 Republicans who voted with Democrats to block Trump from taking military action against Iran Conservatives ask Barr to lay out Trump's rationale for census question House sends Trump border aid bill after Pelosi caves to pressure from moderates MORE (Ariz.), Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieThe 27 Republicans who voted with Democrats to block Trump from taking military action against Iran House sends Trump border aid bill after Pelosi caves to pressure from moderates GOP scores procedural win by securing more funding to enforce Iran sanctions MORE (Ky.) and Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyRising number of GOP lawmakers criticize Trump remarks about minority Dems The 27 Republicans who voted with Democrats to block Trump from taking military action against Iran Ocasio-Cortez defends being sworn in at hearing on conditions for migrants MORE (Texas) — all voted against the measure.

Notable defectors on the Democratic side included: Assistant Speaker Ben Ray Luján (N.M.), Democratic Caucus Chairman Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesHouse Democrat pushes for censuring Trump in closed-door meeting Ocasio-Cortez top aide emerges as lightning rod amid Democratic feud This week: House Democrats voting to hold Barr, Ross in contempt MORE (N.Y.), Democratic Caucus Vice Chair Katherine ClarkKatherine Marlea ClarkDemocratic leaders seek balance amid liberal push to go big on immigration Katherine Clark quietly eyes leadership ascent Epstein charges put Trump Labor secretary back in spotlight MORE (Mass.), Democratic Policy and Communications Committee co-Chair Ted LieuTed W. LieuTed Lieu: Trump a 'racist ass' House Democrats request briefing on Epstein, Acosta Members to have little time to question Mueller MORE, Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerTrump knocks Mueller after deal struck for him to testify House Democrats request briefing on Epstein, Acosta Nadler apologized after repeatedly calling Hope Hicks 'Ms. Lewandowski' at hearing MORE (D-N.Y.) and members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus.

Rep. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineCritics slam billion Facebook fine as weak Tech executives to take hot seat at antitrust hearing Social media summit highlights partisan approaches on tech MORE (D-R.I.), who also voted against the measure, said the crisis at the border requires some assurances that the money is "going to be used the right way."

"And I think people were very frustrated that those protections were taken out," he said.

Scott Wong and Mike Lillis contributed.

Updated at 6:50 p.m.