House sends Trump border aid bill after Pelosi caves to pressure from moderates

The House on Thursday passed a bipartisan Senate bill that would address the crisis at the southern border, dealing a major blow to Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump passes Pence a dangerous buck Overnight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Stone judge under pressure over calls for new trial MORE (D-Calif.) and progressives who had pushed for stronger protections for migrant children.

Ninety-five Democrats opposed the measure in a 305-102 vote. The legislation now heads to the White House, where President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump passes Pence a dangerous buck Overnight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Trump nods at reputation as germaphobe during coronavirus briefing: 'I try to bail out as much as possible' after sneezes MORE is expected to sign the $4.6 billion package into law.

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Pelosi and her leadership team had initially intended to hold a Thursday vote to amend the Senate-passed bill to include language that would implement safety and care standards for law enforcers working with migrants — provisions pursued by liberals that were in the previous House-passed bill.

But moderate Democrats in groups like the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus and the Blue Dog Coalition put pressure on Pelosi to take up the Senate bill immediately.

Rep. Josh GottheimerJoshua (Josh) GottheimerThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Roger Stone gets over three years in prison; Brutal night for Bloomberg Three members of Congress endorse Bloomberg after raucous debate Democrats tear into Trump's speech: It was a 'MAGA rally' MORE (D-N.J.), co-chair of the Problem Solvers Caucus, informed Pelosi he had rallied enough support against the changes backed by progressives, resulting in Pelosi losing significant leverage in her fight for changes to the Senate measure.

The eventual vote on the Senate bill sparked outrage from left-leaning members like Congressional Progressive Caucus Co-Chairman Mark PocanMark William PocanOvernight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Trump names Pence to lead coronavirus response Azar downplays chance Trump will appoint coronavirus czar MORE (D-Wis.). 

“Since when did the Problem Solvers Caucus become the Child Abuse Caucus? Wouldn't they want to at least fight against contractors who run deplorable facilities? Kids are the only ones who could lose today,” he tweeted.

Progressive firebrand Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOvernight Energy: New Interior rule would limit scientific studies agency can consider | Panel battles over tree-planting bill | Trump to resume coal leases on public lands Ocasio-Cortez reads entire Green New Deal into congressional record Ocasio-Cortez meets with 'Roma' star to discuss workers' rights MORE (D-N.Y.) argued that Democrats should have fought harder to strike a deal with the Senate that would have provided more Democratic wins.

"The problem right now and the question at hand is Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Push for national popular vote movement gets boost from conservatives To avoid November catastrophe, Democrats have to KO Sanders MORE sent us a bill and we're putting a big check mark on it instead of even trying to negotiate. ... What Mitch McConnell is doing is relying on the time pressure of recess," she said on CNN.

Top Republicans advocated for the passage of the Senate bill ahead of the vote, with dozens of GOP lawmakers saying on the House floor that it should be passed by unanimous consent.

Seven conservatives — GOP Reps. Justin AmashJustin AmashHouse passes historic legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime Barr ensnared in Roger Stone firestorm House passes bipartisan bill to create women's history museum MORE (Mich.), Andy Biggs (Ariz.), Mo BrooksMorris (Mo) Jackson BrooksRepublican group asks 'what is Trump hiding' in Times Square billboard Conservative group hits White House with billboard ads: 'What is Trump hiding?' Trump takes pulse of GOP on Alabama Senate race MORE (Ala.), Louie GohmertLouis (Louie) Buller GohmertHouse passes historic legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime House Natural Resources gives Grijalva power to subpoena Interior Republicans eye top spot on Natural Resources panel MORE (Texas), Paul GosarPaul Anthony GosarOvernight Energy: Green groups to sue over Trump rollback of Obama water rules | GOP climate plan faces pushback from right | Bezos launches B climate initiative GOP climate plan faces pushback — from Republicans New Qatari prime minister means new opportunities MORE (Ariz.), Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieHouse passes historic legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime Overnight Energy: Green groups to sue over Trump rollback of Obama water rules | GOP climate plan faces pushback from right | Bezos launches B climate initiative GOP climate plan faces pushback — from Republicans MORE (Ky.) and Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyGun control group plans to spend million in Texas in 2020 'Medicare for All' will turn into health care for none The advantage of paying for medical care directly MORE (Texas) — all voted against the measure.

Notable defectors on the Democratic side included: Assistant Speaker Ben Ray Luján (N.M.), Democratic Caucus Chairman Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesLawmakers trade insults over Trump budget cuts On The Money: Fed chief warns Congress on deficits | Trump blames Powell after Dow dips slightly | Trump withdraws nomination of former US attorney for Treasury post Jeffries: Trump budget is a 'declaration of war on the American dream' MORE (N.Y.), Democratic Caucus Vice Chair Katherine ClarkKatherine Marlea ClarkJeffries: Trump budget is a 'declaration of war on the American dream' Senate acquits Trump, ending impeachment saga Sanders, Warren battle for progressive endorsements MORE (Mass.), Democratic Policy and Communications Committee co-Chair Ted LieuTed W. LieuEthics complaint filed against Nunes asks how he's paying for lawsuits Democrats to plow ahead with Trump probes post-acquittal Trump Jr. dismisses 'likelihood' of Pelosi praying for Trump with Satan comparison MORE, Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerThis week: House to vote on legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime Congress set for clash over surveillance reforms Trump adviser presses House investigators to make Bezos testify MORE (D-N.Y.) and members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus.

Rep. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineTrump's intel moves spark Democratic fury Trump adviser presses House investigators to make Bezos testify Hillicon Valley: US hits Huawei with new charges | Judge orders Pentagon to halt 'war cloud' work amid Amazon challenge | IRS removes guidance on Fortnite game currency MORE (D-R.I.), who also voted against the measure, said the crisis at the border requires some assurances that the money is "going to be used the right way."

"And I think people were very frustrated that those protections were taken out," he said.

Scott Wong and Mike Lillis contributed.

Updated at 6:50 p.m.