House sends Trump border aid bill after Pelosi caves to pressure from moderates

The House on Thursday passed a bipartisan Senate bill that would address the crisis at the southern border, dealing a major blow to Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiLouisiana governor wins re-election Dynamic scoring: Forward-thinking budgeting practices to grow our economy Pelosi: Trump tweets on Yovanovitch show his 'insecurity as an imposter' MORE (D-Calif.) and progressives who had pushed for stronger protections for migrant children.

Ninety-five Democrats opposed the measure in a 305-102 vote. The legislation now heads to the White House, where President TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP divided over impeachment trial strategy Official testifies that Bolton had 'one-on-one meeting' with Trump over Ukraine aid Louisiana governor wins re-election MORE is expected to sign the $4.6 billion package into law.

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Pelosi and her leadership team had initially intended to hold a Thursday vote to amend the Senate-passed bill to include language that would implement safety and care standards for law enforcers working with migrants — provisions pursued by liberals that were in the previous House-passed bill.

But moderate Democrats in groups like the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus and the Blue Dog Coalition put pressure on Pelosi to take up the Senate bill immediately.

Rep. Josh GottheimerJoshua (Josh) GottheimerProgressive group unveils first slate of 2020 congressional endorsements Hillicon Valley: Critics press feds to block Google, Fitbit deal | Twitter takes down Hamas, Hezbollah-linked accounts | TikTok looks to join online anti-terrorism effort | Apple pledges .5B to affordable housing Twitter takes down Hamas, Hezbollah-affiliated accounts after lawmaker pressure MORE (D-N.J.), co-chair of the Problem Solvers Caucus, informed Pelosi he had rallied enough support against the changes backed by progressives, resulting in Pelosi losing significant leverage in her fight for changes to the Senate measure.

The eventual vote on the Senate bill sparked outrage from left-leaning members like Congressional Progressive Caucus Co-Chairman Mark PocanMark William PocanGOP senator rips into Pelosi at Trump rally: 'It must suck to be that dumb' House progressives to push for floor amendments on Pelosi drug price bill How Trump and Pelosi went from bad to worse MORE (D-Wis.). 

“Since when did the Problem Solvers Caucus become the Child Abuse Caucus? Wouldn't they want to at least fight against contractors who run deplorable facilities? Kids are the only ones who could lose today,” he tweeted.

Progressive firebrand Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezLouisiana governor wins re-election White House backs Stephen Miller amid white nationalist allegations Ocasio-Cortez voices support for Taylor Swift in artist's battle to perform her songs MORE (D-N.Y.) argued that Democrats should have fought harder to strike a deal with the Senate that would have provided more Democratic wins.

"The problem right now and the question at hand is Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP divided over impeachment trial strategy On The Money: Trump asks Supreme Court to block Dem subpoena for financial records | Kudlow 'very optimistic' for new NAFTA deal | House passes Ex-Im Bank bill opposed by Trump, McConnell Top House Democrats ask for review of DHS appointments MORE sent us a bill and we're putting a big check mark on it instead of even trying to negotiate. ... What Mitch McConnell is doing is relying on the time pressure of recess," she said on CNN.

Top Republicans advocated for the passage of the Senate bill ahead of the vote, with dozens of GOP lawmakers saying on the House floor that it should be passed by unanimous consent.

Seven conservatives — GOP Reps. Justin AmashJustin AmashTrump allies assail impeachment on process while House Democrats promise open hearings soon Hoyer: We are going to move as fast 'as the facts and truth dictate' on open hearings Conway spars with Wallace on whether White House will cooperate with impeachment inquiry after formal vote MORE (Mich.), Andy Biggs (Ariz.), Mo BrooksMorris (Mo) Jackson BrooksTrump takes pulse of GOP on Alabama Senate race The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Better Medicare Alliance - Dems unveil impeachment measure; Vindman splits GOP Jeff Sessions calling Alabama lawmakers about 2020 Senate bid MORE (Ala.), Louie GohmertLouis (Louie) Buller GohmertLive coverage: House holds first public impeachment hearing GOP lawmaker invokes possibility of 'civil war' after House votes on Trump impeachment procedures Why the GOP march of mad hatters poses a threat to our Democracy MORE (Texas), Paul GosarPaul Anthony GosarGosar leaves message in tweets: 'Epstein didn't kill himself' Omar comes under scrutiny for 'present' vote on Armenian genocide House passes bill to prohibit mining near Grand Canyon MORE (Ariz.), Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieGOP lawmaker says newly-released Butina was jailed due to 'Russophobia' O'Rourke gun confiscation talk alarms Democrats Scalise blasts Democratic legislation on gun reforms MORE (Ky.) and Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyLawmakers from both sides of the aisle mourn Cummings Trump congratulates China on anniversary as GOP lawmakers decry communist rule Texas Republicans sound alarm about rapidly evolving state MORE (Texas) — all voted against the measure.

Notable defectors on the Democratic side included: Assistant Speaker Ben Ray Luján (N.M.), Democratic Caucus Chairman Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesUSMCA deal close, but not 'imminent,' Democrats say House Democrat's Halloween display mourns passed bills that die in McConnell's 'legislative graveyard' Democrats unveil impeachment procedures MORE (N.Y.), Democratic Caucus Vice Chair Katherine ClarkKatherine Marlea ClarkThe Hill's Morning Report - Fallout from day one of Trump impeachment hearing 'Squad' members recruit Raskin to run for Oversight gavel House passes third bill aimed at preventing foreign election interference MORE (Mass.), Democratic Policy and Communications Committee co-Chair Ted LieuTed W. LieuWyden urges FCC to secure 5G networks against cyber threats Democrat hits White House spokeswoman after Trump appointee changes testimony PETA asks DOJ to stop conducting training that harms animals MORE, Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerHouse to vote on bill to ensure citizenship for children of overseas service members As impeachment goes public, forget 'conventional wisdom' What this 'impeachment' is really about — and it's not the Constitution MORE (D-N.Y.) and members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus.

Rep. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineHillicon Valley: Federal inquiry opened into Google health data deal | Facebook reports millions of post takedowns | Microsoft shakes up privacy debate | Disney plus tops 10M sign-ups in first day Top antitrust Dem presses DOJ, FTC on Google's Fitbit acquisition Hillicon Valley: California AG reveals Facebook investigation | McConnell criticizes Twitter's political ad ban | Lawmakers raise concerns over Google takeover of Fitbit | Dem pushes FCC to secure 5G networks MORE (D-R.I.), who also voted against the measure, said the crisis at the border requires some assurances that the money is "going to be used the right way."

"And I think people were very frustrated that those protections were taken out," he said.

Scott Wong and Mike Lillis contributed.

Updated at 6:50 p.m.