California Democrats unveil redistricting reform bill after Supreme Court partisan gerrymandering ruling

California Democrats unveil redistricting reform bill after Supreme Court partisan gerrymandering ruling
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A group of California Democrats unveiled legislation Friday to place new requirements on how congressional districts are redrawn a day after the Supreme Court ruled that courts can’t resolve partisan gerrymandering claims.

The bill, led by House Rules Committee Chairwoman Zoe LofgrenZoe Ellen LofgrenBottom line Gun epidemic is personal for lawmakers touched by violence House Democrats demand administration consult with Congress before determining refugee admissions MORE (D-Calif.) along with Reps. Alan LowenthalAlan Stuart LowenthalHouse leaves for six-week August recess House passes bill opposing BDS, exposing divide among Democrats Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment MORE (D-Calif.) and Julia BrownleyJulia Andrews BrownleyKatherine Clark quietly eyes leadership ascent California Democrats unveil redistricting reform bill after Supreme Court partisan gerrymandering ruling WHIP LIST: The 132 House Democrats backing an impeachment inquiry MORE (D-Calif.), would require that states adopt independent redistricting commissions to draw new district maps after each decennial census.

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The proposal comes one day after the Supreme Court, in a 5-4 decision along ideological lines, found that partisan gerrymandering claims are a political issue that courts can’t weigh in on.

“If the U.S. Supreme Court won’t fight to protect Americans’ votes, then Congress will,” Lofgren said in a statement Friday.

“Our democracy cannot function properly unless every person’s vote counts equally, and voters choose their elected officials, not the other way around. My bill would fix our broken redistricting process to ensure all voices are heard and politicians are held accountable.”

The majority of California Democrats in the House also back the bill, according to a press release.

The bill would require that states create 15-member commissions to draw congressional districts, rather than leaving the responsibility to state legislatures.

Each commission would be evenly divided among three political affiliations — the state’s majority party, minority party and an unaffiliated or minor party.

And the bill calls for a three-judge court to create and implement a plan if states fail to create the commissions or to adopt a commission’s map.

The legislation echoes provisions included in House Democrat’s anti-corruption legislative package H.R. 1, which passed the House earlier this year. However, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPatagonia says to shut stores for a few hours during Global Climate Strike Overnight Health Care — Presented by Partnership for America's Health Care Future — Pelosi unveils signature plan to lower drug prices | Trump says it's 'great to see' plan | Progressives pushing for changes On The Money: House votes to avert shutdown, fund government through November | Judge blocks California law requiring Trump tax returns | Senate panel approves three spending bills MORE (R-Ky.) has said that he won’t bring it up for a vote on the Senate floor.