Reparations bill gains traction in the House

Reparations bill gains traction in the House
© Greg Nash

Rep. Sheila Jackson LeeSheila Jackson LeeDemocrats press Nadler to hold Lewandowski in contempt Democrats bicker over strategy on impeachment Jackson Lee: 'Racism is a national security threat' MORE’s (D-Texas) bill that would form a commission to study whether black Americans should receive reparations for slavery is gaining traction among top Democrats, with the legislation reaching 90 co-sponsors by the end of June. 

More than two dozen Democratic lawmakers — including notable members such as House Education and Labor Committee Chairman Bobby ScottRobert (Bobby) Cortez ScottNYC teacher suing DeVos over student loan forgiveness program House panel delays vote on surprise medical bills legislation Ten notable Democrats who do not favor impeachment MORE (Va.), 2020 Democratic presidential hopeful Rep. Seth MoultonSeth MoultonYoung insurgents aren't rushing to Kennedy's side in Markey fight Wall Street ends volatile month in major test for Trump The Hill's Morning Report — Hurricane headed for Florida changes Trump's travel plans MORE (Mass.), Congressional Hispanic Caucus Chairman Joaquin CastroJoaquin CastroRNC reports record .5 million fundraising haul for August Hispanic Democrats announce 'Latina Prosperity Principles' It's legal to tweet the names of all of Trump's donors, but it's probably not a good idea MORE and House Democratic Policy and Communications Committee Chairman David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineLeaders of House antitrust investigation to meet with Zuckerberg Pelosi: Lewandowski should have been held in contempt 'right then and there' Nadler considering holding Lewandowski in contempt MORE (R.I.) — have signed on to the bill since the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties held a hearing in mid-June on the issue and House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerDemocrat accuses GOP of opposing DC statehood because of 'race and partisanship' News outlets choose their darlings, ignore others' voices Overnight Health Care — Presented by Partnership for America's Health Care Future — Pelosi set to unveil drug price plan | Abortion rate in US hits lowest level since Roe v. Wade | Dems threaten to subpoena Juul MORE (D-Md.) announced he intends to bring the bill to the floor for a vote. 

"I am proud to sign on to this bill and join Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee," Castro said in a statement to The Hill. 

Moulton said he believes it’s critical for Congress to have an open debate on the issue. 

House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) "always said that reparations are about repair," Moulton said during an appearance on New York radio show "The Breakfast Club." "It’s not necessarily just writing a check. It’s about investing — investing in the places where black people have been historically left behind."

Jackson Lee reintroduced the legislation at the start of the 116th Congress, making the argument that "the call for reparations represents a commitment to entering a constructive dialogue on the role of slavery and racism in shaping present-day conditions in our community and American society."

While the bill has gained momentum in the Democratic-controlled lower chamber, it faces an unlikely path in the Republican-controlled Senate. 

"I don't think reparations for something that happened 150 years ago for whom none us currently living are responsible is a good idea," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPatagonia says to shut stores for a few hours during Global Climate Strike Overnight Health Care — Presented by Partnership for America's Health Care Future — Pelosi unveils signature plan to lower drug prices | Trump says it's 'great to see' plan | Progressives pushing for changes On The Money: House votes to avert shutdown, fund government through November | Judge blocks California law requiring Trump tax returns | Senate panel approves three spending bills MORE (R-Ky.) told reporters last month. "We've tried to deal with our original sin of slavery by fighting a civil war, by passing landmark civil rights legislation. We elected an African American president."