Hurd: 'I shouldn't be the only African-American Republican in the House'

Hurd: 'I shouldn't be the only African-American Republican in the House'
© Stefani Reynolds

Rep. Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Democrats open televised impeachment hearings Here are the key players to watch at impeachment hearing Hillicon Valley: Schumer questions Army over use of TikTok | Federal court rules against random searches of travelers' phones | Groups push for election security funds in stopgap bill | Facebook's new payment feature | Disney+ launch hit by glitches MORE (R-Texas) on Sunday said the Republican Party needs to start reflecting the population to keep control of Texas, and compete across the nation. 

"I think the Republican Party should be a broad party. I shouldn't be the only African-American Republican in the House of Representatives," Hurd said Sunday on NBC's "Meet the Press." 

Despite having no Democrats elected to state-wide office, Hurd said "ruby-red Texas" is "actually purple."

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"If we want to keep a Republican Party in Texas, the Republican Party in Texas needs to start looking like Texas. I think that goes for the rest of the country as well," Hurd said. 

NBC's Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddChuck Todd on impeachment hearing: Part of GOP 'just not accepting facts that are facts' Intelligence Democrat: Stop using 'quid pro quo' to describe Trump allegations Brown confirms he won't enter 2020 race: 'I think it's a good field' MORE also mentioned recent comments Hurd made, published in the Washington Blade, in which he advised fellow Republicans: "Don't be an asshole. Don’t be a racist. Don’t be a misogynist, right? Don’t be a homophobe."

Hurd's comments were made at a June 20 Pride Social gathering organized by the Log Cabin Republicans of D.C., an LGBT GOP group. 

The congressman said on "Meet the Press" that his party has a chance to gain back voters. He said independents and "center-left Democrats" are concerned at the state of the Democratic Party and where it is moving. 

"We have an opportunity to intrigue those folks that are interested in solving problems in the future by empowering people not government," Hurd said.