Green to file articles of impeachment against Trump on Tuesday night

Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenClimate finance must push net-zero emissions Trump impeachment efforts will haunt the next Democrat in the White House Overnight Energy: Lawmaker, scientists challenge move to eliminate key advisory boards | White House nixes climate language from emissions proposal | Raffle offers deer hunt with Donald Trump Jr. MORE (D-Texas) said that he plans to introduce his articles of impeachment against President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocratic senator rips Trump's 'let them fight' remarks: 'Enough is enough' Warren warns Facebook may help reelect Trump 'and profit off of it' Trump touts Turkey cease-fire: 'Sometimes you have to let them fight' MORE on Tuesday night and will force a House floor vote on them in the coming days.

Green said in a statement that he will read his articles of impeachment "before the close of the business today."

A spokeswoman for Green said that he has informed Democratic leaders of his plans.
 
The House is scheduled to vote later Tuesday on a resolution to formally condemn Trump for tweets in which he told four nonwhite, progressive freshman congresswomen — Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOcasio-Cortez mourns Cummings: 'A devastating loss for our country' Booker endorses Lipinski challenger Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle mourn Cummings MORE (D-N.Y.), Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyOcasio-Cortez mourns Cummings: 'A devastating loss for our country' Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle mourn Cummings Omar endorses Sanders presidential bid MORE (D-Mass.), Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarKrystal Ball reacts to Ocasio-Cortez endorsing Sanders: 'Class power over girl power' The Hill's Morning Report - Tempers boil over at the White House Krystal Ball on Sanders debate performance: 'He absolutely hit it out of the park' MORE (D-Minn.) and Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibOcasio-Cortez mourns Cummings: 'A devastating loss for our country' Elijah Cummings, Democratic chairman and powerful Trump critic, dies at 68 Krystal Ball on Sanders debate performance: 'He absolutely hit it out of the park' MORE (D-Mich.) — to "go back" to their countries. Only Omar, a Somali refugee who is an American citizen, was born outside the U.S.
 
Green said the comments pushed him to force a vote on impeachment, which will be the first since Democrats took over the House majority in January. Green previously forced two procedural votes on his articles of impeachment in December 2017 and January 2018 while Republicans controlled the House. Both efforts drew the support of about 60 Democrats.
 
Green argued that the House shouldn't stop at condemning Trump's remarks targeting the freshman congresswomen.
 
"To condemn a racist president is not enough, we must impeach him. This will be a defining vote. The world is watching, and history will judge us all," Green said in his statement. 
 
In a House floor speech earlier Tuesday, Green said his latest impeachment measure would be similar to his previous articles of impeachment that accused Trump of inflaming racial tensions in America. 
 
Under House rules, the chamber would have to take up Green’s resolution within two legislative days after he introduced it. Introducing the resolution on Tuesday would mean a floor vote — either a direct up-or-down vote or a motion to table it — by Thursday. 
 
Some Democrats in favor of impeachment said Tuesday that Green’s timing isn’t ideal. 
 
Green dismissed the idea that his impeachment effort could draw more support after Mueller testifies next week. 
 
“The Mueller testimony will have no impact on this,” Green told reporters outside the House chamber. “They’re totally separate issues in terms of impeachment.”
 
His latest effort comes amid mounting support for an impeachment inquiry, albeit one focused on the Trump administration's handling of Democratic investigations and not the president's controversial rhetoric. Even those who favor an impeachment inquiry say Green’s decision to force a floor vote won’t help their efforts.
 
Green offered a preview of his latest impeachment measure, saying that it asserts that Trump "has, by his statements, brought the high office of President of the United States in contempt, ridicule, disgrace and disrepute, has sown discord among the people of the United States."
 
 
"I think he feels strongly about it, and if he deems it appropriate to offer it, he'll offer it," Hoyer said. "I'm not going to try to discourage him. He has to do what he thinks is right."
 
But Hoyer reiterated that Democratic leaders think pushing for impeachment at this point is premature, noting that former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerFox News legal analyst says Trump call with Ukraine leader could be 'more serious' than what Mueller 'dragged up' Lewandowski says Mueller report was 'very clear' in proving 'there was no obstruction,' despite having 'never' read it Fox's Cavuto roasts Trump over criticism of network MORE is testifying before Congress next week about his report's findings on whether Trump obstructed justice in his investigation of Russia's election interference.

"I think we need to hear from [Mueller] and analyze what he had to say," Hoyer said. "I think there's a lot of information to come, and we'll see — as the Speaker has said — where it leads us."