House votes against striking Pelosi remarks from record

The House voted against striking Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiHouse Democrats expected to unveil articles of impeachment Tuesday Impeachment witness to meet with Senate GOP Tuesday Press: Pelosi strikes back, hatred is a sin MORE's (D-Calif.) floor remarks blasting President TrumpDonald John TrumpLawmakers release defense bill with parental leave-for-Space-Force deal House Democrats expected to unveil articles of impeachment Tuesday Houston police chief excoriates McConnell, Cornyn and Cruz on gun violence MORE from the record on Tuesday after the House parliamentarian in a rare rebuke of the Speaker said her comments violated House rules.

The vote on the motion to strike Pelosi’s remarks failed in a 190-232 vote with no Democratic support. Every Republican voted in favor of the motion.

The parliamentarian ruled the speech violated rules forbidding personal attacks on the House floor against the president.

Pelosi was offering comments about a resolution set to condemn as racist Trump's comments earlier in the week that four minority congresswomen should "go back" to their home countries. All four are U.S. citizens, and three of them were born in the U.S.

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Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerLawmakers release defense bill with parental leave-for-Space-Force deal This week: House impeachment inquiry hits crucial stretch House approves two-state resolution in implicit rebuke of Trump MORE (D-Md.) announced the parliamentarian’s decision against Pelosi, stating that by calling the remarks by Trump racist, she had violated the House’s rules.

"The chair is prepared to rule. The words of the gentlewoman from California contain an accusation of racist behavior on the part of the president. As memorialized in Chapter 29, Section 65.6, characterizing an action as racist is not in order," House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) said on the floor ahead of the vote. 

"The chair relies on the precedent of May 15, 1984, and finds that the words should not be used in debate," he continued.

Pelosi said she did not regret her remarks.

"I stand by my statement. I’m proud of the attention that’s being called to it because what the president said was completely inappropriate against our colleagues, but not just against them, against so many people in our country," Pelosi told reporters ahead of the vote.

Rep. Doug CollinsDouglas (Doug) Allen CollinsGOP lawmaker closes: Impeachment a 'scam,' Judiciary a 'rubber stamp' Tempers flare at tense Judiciary hearing on impeachment Overnight Defense: Bombshell report reveals officials misled public over progress in Afghanistan | Amazon accuses Trump of 'improper pressure' in Pentagon contract decision | House Judiciary holds final impeachment hearing MORE (R-Ga.), the ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee, led the effort to have Pelosi’s remarks removed. 

Earlier, Rep. Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalOvernight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — Deal on surprise medical bills faces obstacles | House GOP unveils rival drug pricing measure ahead of Pelosi vote | Justices to hear case over billions in ObamaCare payments Judiciary Democrat: Trump himself is 'smoking gun' in impeachment case Live coverage: Democrats, Republicans seek to win PR battle in final House impeachment hearing MORE (D-Wash.) in the same debate asked that remarks made by Rep. Sean DuffySean DuffyJuan Williams: Trump has nothing left but smears On The Money: Trump seeks to shift spotlight from impeachment to economy | Appropriators agree to Dec. 20 funding deadline | New study says tariffs threaten 1.5M jobs Ex-Rep. Duffy to join lobbying firm BGR MORE (R-Wis.) be stricken from the record for calling Democratic lawmakers anti-American.

But she appeared to withdraw her request during an ensuing discussion with the presiding House member, Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-Mo.).

The battle over floor speeches came as the House debated the resolution condemning the president's comments.

In her floor remarks, Pelosi criticized Trump’s “xenophobic attacks on our members, on our people.”

“How shameful to hear him continue to defend those offensive words, words that we have all heard him repeat, not only about our members but about countless others,” she said.

After Collins asked Pelosi if she would like to rephrase her comments, Pelosi said she had cleared them with the parliamentarian in advance. 

“I would like to make a point of order that the gentlewoman's words are unparliamentary and ask they be taken down,” Collins said. 

Cleaver, who was presiding over the floor, then reminded members “to refrain from engaging in personalities toward the president.”

As deliberations took place, Pelosi exited the chamber despite members who have been flagged for potential violations being expected to remain on the floor. 

Cleaver, in a dramatic moment, later abruptly left his position presiding over the House in frustration. He said the two parties had been treated fairly in the floor debate.

"We don't ever, ever want to pass up it seems an opportunity to escalate, and that's what this is," he said. "I dare anybody to look at any of the footage and see if there is unfairness, but unfairness is not enough because we want to just fight."

"I abandon the chair," he then stated before slamming his gavel down and leaving his position. 

He was replaced by Rep. G.K. ButterfieldGeorge (G.K.) Kenneth ButterfieldDemocrats likely to gain seats under new North Carolina maps North Carolina poised to pass new congressional maps Black leaders say African American support in presidential primary is fluid MORE (D-N.C.). 

Republicans were reveling in the Democrats’ problems.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyDemocrat who opposed Trump, Clinton impeachment inquiries faces big test CNN Pelosi town hall finishes third in cable news ratings race, draws 1.6M Economy adds 266K jobs in November, blowing past expectations MORE (R-Calif.) took to Twitter to note Pelosi would not be able to speak on the floor for the remainder of the day after failing to comply with House rules. 

“BREAKING NEWS —> Speaker Pelosi just broke the rules of the House, and is no longer permitted to speak on the floor of the House for the rest of the day,” he tweeted. 

But McCarthy's tweet ultimately proved to be premature.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerGOP lawmaker criticizes Democratic counsel over facial expression: 'Be very careful' Watchdog report finds FBI not motivated by political bias in Trump probe Judiciary fireworks: GOP accuses Democratic counsel of impugning Trump's motives MORE (D-N.Y.) requested Pelosi's speaking privileges be restored immediately after the vote to strike her comments from the record failed on the floor.

"I move that the gentlewoman from California, Ms. Pelosi, be permitted to proceed in order," he said on the floor.

Collins requested a recorded vote on the motion to allow her to speak, which passed in a 231-190 vote with no Republican support.