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Two Democrats vow to press forward on Trump impeachment

House Democratic leaders were successful Wednesday in staving off a bid to impeach President TrumpDonald TrumpChinese apps could face subpoenas, bans under Biden executive order: report Kim says North Korea needs to be 'prepared' for 'confrontation' with US Ex-Colorado GOP chair accused of stealing more than 0K from pro-Trump PAC MORE, but the effort is far from dead.

A handful of Democrats added their names last week to the long list of lawmakers now endorsing an impeachment inquiry, growing the tally to more than a third of the caucus.

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Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenManchin meets with Texas lawmakers on voting rights Lawmakers roll out legislation to defend pipelines against cyber threats Bipartisan lawmakers call for action on anti-hate crime measures MORE, the Texas Democrat who forced last week's impeachment vote, is threatening to revisit the issue later this cycle. And Rep. Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenWray grilled on FBI's handling of Jan. 6 Viola Fletcher, oldest living survivor of Tulsa Race Massacre, testifies in Congress 'seeking justice' Lobbying world MORE (D-Tenn.), who introduced articles of impeachment in the last Congress, says he plans to do so again, likely after the long August recess.

“I've been thinking about it the whole year, and I've annotated the last articles we had that had encompassed everything he had done at the time of their filing, in November 2017, to include what I think are the most important impeachable actions,” Cohen told The Hill.

“I suspect by sometime in the fall I'll probably file it, but it depends on his additional, further impeachable behavior, if more is exhibited,” he continued. “I expect it will be.”

An escalation in the Democratic effort to oust the president could deepen the dilemma facing Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiYoung Turks founder on Democratic establishment: 'They lie nonstop' Hillicon Valley: Senate unanimously confirms Chris Inglis as first White House cyber czar | Scrutiny mounts on Microsoft's surveillance technology | Senators unveil bill to crack down on cyber criminals 'It's still a BFD': Democrats applaud ruling upholding ObamaCare MORE (D-Calif.) and her leadership team, who have walked a delicate line between discouraging impeachment, which most voters oppose, without incensing a liberal base that's grown increasingly outraged with Trump's behavior — and the go-slow strategy of Democratic leaders.

Pelosi and the party's top brass favor a methodical investigative approach, featuring a series of committee probes into Trump's actions, including those related to former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerSenate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel MORE's probe into Russian interference in the 2016 elections. 

“We have six committees that are working on following the facts in terms of any abuse of power, obstruction of justice and the rest that the president may have engaged in,” Pelosi said hours before the vote on Green's impeachment resolution. “That is the serious path that we are on.”

Still, a growing number of Democrats are backing the more aggressive move to launch an impeachment inquiry, with at least four lawmakers — Reps. Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchShakespeare gets a congressional hearing in this year's 'Will on the Hill' Democrats debate shape of new Jan. 6 probe On the Money: Tech giants face rising pressure from shareholder activists | House Democrats urge IRS to reverse Trump-era rule reducing donor disclosure | Sen. Warren, Jamie Dimon spar over overdraft fees at Senate hearing MORE (Vt.), Bill PascrellWilliam (Bill) James PascrellZombie Tax punishes farmers to fill DC coffers Democrats face new pressure to raise taxes New report reignites push for wealth tax MORE (N.J.), Ann KirkpatrickAnn KirkpatrickDemocrats confront difficult prospects for midterms Surgeon who treated Gabby Giffords after shooting launches House bid in Arizona These House lawmakers aren't seeking reelection in 2022 MORE (Ariz.) and Rick LarsenRichard (Rick) Ray LarsenDemocrats seek answers from Boeing, FAA after production issues with 737 Max, Dreamliner jets Democrats debate fast-track for infrastructure package LIVE COVERAGE: House votes to name Speaker MORE (Wash.) — endorsing the effort last week after Trump implored four minority congresswomen to “go back” to their countries. 

The announcements brought the tally of Democratic impeachment supporters to 87. And that list is likely to grow after Mueller testifies before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees on Wednesday. 

Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben Raskin House Democrats to Schumer: Vote again on Jan. 6 probe Democrats claim vindication, GOP cries witch hunt as McGahn finally testifies Trump DOJ seized phone records of New York Times reporters MORE (D-Md.), a member of the Judiciary panel who supports an impeachment inquiry, noted that Mueller's report spotlighted 10 episodes when Trump potentially obstructed justice as well as “massive evidence of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian nationals.” He's hoping voters will be swayed by the public testimony. 

“What we're hoping for is that there will be some public clarity about what is really in the Mueller report,” said Raskin, a former professor of constitutional law. “We want some basic public education about it.”

Cohen introduced five articles of impeachment in 2017, which charged Trump with obstructing justice in firing former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyMystery surrounds Justice's pledge on journalist records NYT publisher: DOJ phone records seizure a 'dangerous incursion' on press freedom Trump DOJ seized phone records of New York Times reporters MORE; violating the foreign emoluments clause, which bars public officials from receiving gifts from foreign governments without Congress’s consent, and the domestic emoluments clause, which bars the president from profiting from his office; and undermining two of the country’s central institutions — the courts and the press — in ways that threaten the health of the nation’s democracy.

The Tennessee liberal, who chairs the Judiciary subcommittee on the Constitution, has held off on reintroducing any impeachment measures since taking that gavel. But he's been keeping close tabs on Trump’s actions and adding provisions to his previous articles to include the administration's stonewalling of congressional investigations as well as some of the race-based episodes highlighted in Green's resolution, including Trump's recent attacks on Reps. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibHouse Republicans introduce resolution to censure the 'squad' Progressives rally behind Omar while accusing her critics of bias Omar: I wasn't equating terrorist organizations with democratic countries MORE (D-Mich.), Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarYoung Turks founder on Democratic establishment: 'They lie nonstop' Hillary Clinton backs Shontel Brown in Ohio congressional race The Hill's Morning Report - Dems to go-it-alone on infrastructure as bipartisan plan falters MORE (D-Minn.), Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyIt's past time we elect a Black woman governor House Republicans introduce resolution to censure the 'squad' Progressives rally behind Omar while accusing her critics of bias MORE (D-Mass.) and Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezHillary Clinton backs Shontel Brown in Ohio congressional race Ocasio-Cortez, Gillibrand and Moulton call for more high-speed rail funding in infrastructure package Pelosi picks Democrats for special panel tackling inequality MORE (D-N.Y.).

Cohen said he wants to hear testimony from Mueller as well as from other members of Trump's inner circle — including Don McGahn, the former White House counsel, and Corey LewandowskiCorey LewandowskiLewandowski says Trump has not spoken to him about being reinstated Sunday shows preview: Infrastructure expected to dominate as talks continue to drag The Memo: The mystery of post-presidency Trump MORE, Trump's former campaign manager — before introducing his resolution. 

“There are more and more things that come up that need to be included,” Cohen said. 

Reigniting the impeachment debate in the fall could prove to be a headache for Pelosi and Democratic leaders, who are laser-focused on keeping control of the House in 2020, largely by protecting vulnerable lawmakers in swing districts where the issue could pose a liability. Trump, meanwhile, has kept the issue in the public eye by hammering Democrats for conducting a “witch hunt.”

“This should never be allowed to happen to another President of the United States again!” he tweeted after Green's resolution failed.

Green's resolution, accusing the president of inciting racial tensions across the country, highlighted the Democratic fissures. Siding with Pelosi, 137 Democrats voted to table the measure, effectively killing it. But 94 Democrats bucked leadership and joined Green — a jump from the 66 Democrats who supported a similar resolution, also sponsored by Green, in January 2018.

The list of Democrats opposing the motion to table featured several standout names, including members of the leadership team — Reps. Katherine ClarkKatherine Marlea ClarkPelosi signals no further action against Omar Progressives rally behind Omar while accusing her critics of bias Pelosi, leaders seek to squelch Omar controversy with rare joint statement MORE (Mass.), David CicillineDavid CicillineHillicon Valley: House targets tech giants with antitrust bills | Oversight chair presses JBS over payment to hackers | Trump spokesman to join tech company | YouTube suspends GOP senator House unveils antitrust package to rein in tech giants On the Money: Tech giants face rising pressure from shareholder activists | House Democrats urge IRS to reverse Trump-era rule reducing donor disclosure | Sen. Warren, Jamie Dimon spar over overdraft fees at Senate hearing MORE (R.I.) and Ted LieuTed W. LieuGaetz, under investigative cloud, questions FBI director Crenshaw trolled after asking for examples of 'woke ideology' in military Kinzinger slams Gaetz speech: 'This is why we need a January 6 commission' MORE (Calif.) — and the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, Rep. Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerSenate on collision course over Trump DOJ subpoenas Black Democrats press leaders for reparations vote this month House Judiciary to probe DOJ's seizure of data from lawmakers, journalists MORE (N.Y.). 

Both Clark and Nadler said afterward that they don’t support an immediate move to impeachment but were protesting leadership's decision to table Green's resolution in lieu of referring it to the Judiciary Committee. 

“This is not a change in my position. I just believe that these resolutions should go to the committee of jurisdiction,” Clark said. “I still think that our oversight hearings, backed up by the courts, is a strategy that is working and that we should maintain that course. But we're taking no tools off the table.”

Nadler, who has reportedly pressed Pelosi behind closed doors to launch an impeachment inquiry, said it's “premature to say” if he would have acted on a referral to his panel.

“I thought it was the wrong motion. ... I thought it should have been referred to the Judiciary Committee,” he said. “We're investigating the president, so I've said all options are on the table.”

Green, meanwhile, said he was encouraged by the growing support, versus the two measures he brought to the floor in the last Congress, and vowed to force votes on another resolution this cycle — if no one else does.

“The process isn't over,” he said after Wednesday's vote. “I've said all along this is not something I desire to do. But if it is not done by someone, then I will.

“The president, at some point, will be impeached,” he added.