Two Democrats vow to press forward on Trump impeachment

House Democratic leaders were successful Wednesday in staving off a bid to impeach President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump retweets personal attacks on Clinton, Pelosi, Abrams Biden swipes at Trump: 'Presidency is about a lot more than tweeting from your golf cart' GOP sues California over Newsom's vote-by-mail order MORE, but the effort is far from dead.

A handful of Democrats added their names last week to the long list of lawmakers now endorsing an impeachment inquiry, growing the tally to more than a third of the caucus.

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Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Miami mayor worries about suicide and domestic violence rise; Trump-governor debate intensifies Overnight Energy: Iconic national parks close over coronavirus concerns | New EPA order limits telework post-pandemic | Lawmakers urge help for oil and gas workers Bipartisan lawmakers urge assistance for oil and gas workers MORE, the Texas Democrat who forced last week's impeachment vote, is threatening to revisit the issue later this cycle. And Rep. Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenFrontier drops planned fees for social distancing on flights after criticism More resources for the Legal Services Corporation are needed as the pandemic continues JetBlue requiring passengers to wear masks MORE (D-Tenn.), who introduced articles of impeachment in the last Congress, says he plans to do so again, likely after the long August recess.

“I've been thinking about it the whole year, and I've annotated the last articles we had that had encompassed everything he had done at the time of their filing, in November 2017, to include what I think are the most important impeachable actions,” Cohen told The Hill.

“I suspect by sometime in the fall I'll probably file it, but it depends on his additional, further impeachable behavior, if more is exhibited,” he continued. “I expect it will be.”

An escalation in the Democratic effort to oust the president could deepen the dilemma facing Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump retweets personal attacks on Clinton, Pelosi, Abrams Biden swipes at Trump: 'Presidency is about a lot more than tweeting from your golf cart' Federal aid to state and local governments should rely on real numbers MORE (D-Calif.) and her leadership team, who have walked a delicate line between discouraging impeachment, which most voters oppose, without incensing a liberal base that's grown increasingly outraged with Trump's behavior — and the go-slow strategy of Democratic leaders.

Pelosi and the party's top brass favor a methodical investigative approach, featuring a series of committee probes into Trump's actions, including those related to former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's probe into Russian interference in the 2016 elections. 

“We have six committees that are working on following the facts in terms of any abuse of power, obstruction of justice and the rest that the president may have engaged in,” Pelosi said hours before the vote on Green's impeachment resolution. “That is the serious path that we are on.”

Still, a growing number of Democrats are backing the more aggressive move to launch an impeachment inquiry, with at least four lawmakers — Reps. Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchDemocrats roll out national plan to reopen America Democrats press USDA to create rural coronavirus task force Dems unlikely to subpoena Bolton MORE (Vt.), Bill PascrellWilliam (Bill) James PascrellMultiple N.J. homes for veterans see dozens of coronavirus-related deaths Washington Post fact-checks Kimmel on edited Pence video: 'Certainly a phony tale' NY, NJ lawmakers call for more aid to help fight coronavirus MORE (N.J.), Ann KirkpatrickAnn KirkpatrickHouse Democrats jam GOP with coronavirus bill Eleventh Democratic presidential debate to be held in Phoenix Arizona Democrat to get treatment for alcohol dependence after suffering fall MORE (Ariz.) and Rick LarsenRichard (Rick) Ray LarsenHouse GOP lawmaker breaks with party to back proxy voting House passes massive T coronavirus relief package House adopts historic rules changes to allow remote voting MORE (Wash.) — endorsing the effort last week after Trump implored four minority congresswomen to “go back” to their countries. 

The announcements brought the tally of Democratic impeachment supporters to 87. And that list is likely to grow after Mueller testifies before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees on Wednesday. 

Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinMerger moratorium takes center stage in antitrust debate Democrats lobby Biden on VP choice House Democrats urge FDA to revise policy limiting gay, bisexual men from donating plasma MORE (D-Md.), a member of the Judiciary panel who supports an impeachment inquiry, noted that Mueller's report spotlighted 10 episodes when Trump potentially obstructed justice as well as “massive evidence of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian nationals.” He's hoping voters will be swayed by the public testimony. 

“What we're hoping for is that there will be some public clarity about what is really in the Mueller report,” said Raskin, a former professor of constitutional law. “We want some basic public education about it.”

Cohen introduced five articles of impeachment in 2017, which charged Trump with obstructing justice in firing former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyFBI director Wray orders internal review of Flynn case Grenell says intelligence community working to declassify Flynn-Kislyak transcripts FBI director stuck in the middle with 'Obamagate' MORE; violating the foreign emoluments clause, which bars public officials from receiving gifts from foreign governments without Congress’s consent, and the domestic emoluments clause, which bars the president from profiting from his office; and undermining two of the country’s central institutions — the courts and the press — in ways that threaten the health of the nation’s democracy.

The Tennessee liberal, who chairs the Judiciary subcommittee on the Constitution, has held off on reintroducing any impeachment measures since taking that gavel. But he's been keeping close tabs on Trump’s actions and adding provisions to his previous articles to include the administration's stonewalling of congressional investigations as well as some of the race-based episodes highlighted in Green's resolution, including Trump's recent attacks on Reps. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibOvernight Defense: Pentagon memo warns pandemic could go until summer 2021 | Watchdog finds Taliban violence is high despite US deal | Progressive Dems demand defense cuts Progressives demand defense budget cuts amid coronavirus pandemic Overnight Energy: 600K clean energy jobs lost during pandemic, report finds | Democrats target diseases spread by wildlife | Energy Dept. to buy 1M barrels of oil MORE (D-Mich.), Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarOvernight Defense: Pentagon memo warns pandemic could go until summer 2021 | Watchdog finds Taliban violence is high despite US deal | Progressive Dems demand defense cuts Progressives demand defense budget cuts amid coronavirus pandemic Ocasio-Cortez endorses progressive Democrat in Georgia congressional primary MORE (D-Minn.), Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyOvernight Defense: Pentagon memo warns pandemic could go until summer 2021 | Watchdog finds Taliban violence is high despite US deal | Progressive Dems demand defense cuts Progressives demand defense budget cuts amid coronavirus pandemic The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The American Investment Council - Trump takes his 'ready to reopen' mantra on the road MORE (D-Mass.) and Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOcasio-Cortez posts experience getting antibody tested for COVID-19 The continuous whipsawing of climate change policy Budowsky: United Democrats and Biden's New Deal MORE (D-N.Y.).

Cohen said he wants to hear testimony from Mueller as well as from other members of Trump's inner circle — including Don McGahn, the former White House counsel, and Corey LewandowskiCorey R. LewandowskiHouse panel releases long-awaited transcripts from Russia probe Hillicon Valley — Presented by Facebook — FCC fines mobile carriers 0M for selling user data | Twitter verified fake 2020 candidate | Dems press DHS to complete election security report | Reddit chief calls TikTok spyware Rod Blagojevich joins app where people can pay for personalized video message MORE, Trump's former campaign manager — before introducing his resolution. 

“There are more and more things that come up that need to be included,” Cohen said. 

Reigniting the impeachment debate in the fall could prove to be a headache for Pelosi and Democratic leaders, who are laser-focused on keeping control of the House in 2020, largely by protecting vulnerable lawmakers in swing districts where the issue could pose a liability. Trump, meanwhile, has kept the issue in the public eye by hammering Democrats for conducting a “witch hunt.”

“This should never be allowed to happen to another President of the United States again!” he tweeted after Green's resolution failed.

Green's resolution, accusing the president of inciting racial tensions across the country, highlighted the Democratic fissures. Siding with Pelosi, 137 Democrats voted to table the measure, effectively killing it. But 94 Democrats bucked leadership and joined Green — a jump from the 66 Democrats who supported a similar resolution, also sponsored by Green, in January 2018.

The list of Democrats opposing the motion to table featured several standout names, including members of the leadership team — Reps. Katherine ClarkKatherine Marlea ClarkPelosi scrambles to secure quick passage of coronavirus aid Democrat says House vote on trillion aid deal could fall to Friday MA lawmakers press HHS secretary on status of state's protective equipment MORE (Mass.), David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineTrump, GOP go all-in on anti-China strategy Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers demand answers on Chinese COVID hacks | Biden re-ups criticism of Amazon | House Dem bill seeks to limit microtargeting House Democrat to introduce bill cracking down on ad targeting MORE (R.I.) and Ted LieuTed W. LieuTed Lieu responds to viral video: 'Costco has a right to require that customers wear a mask' Bipartisan Senate group offers new help to state, local governments California Democrat blasts Huntington Beach protesters: They 'undoubtedly spread the virus' MORE (Calif.) — and the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, Rep. Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerThe House impeachment inquiry loses another round — and yes, that's still going on Democrats call on DHS to allow free calls at ICE detention centers Warren announces slate of endorsements including Wendy Davis and Cornyn challenger Hegar MORE (N.Y.). 

Both Clark and Nadler said afterward that they don’t support an immediate move to impeachment but were protesting leadership's decision to table Green's resolution in lieu of referring it to the Judiciary Committee. 

“This is not a change in my position. I just believe that these resolutions should go to the committee of jurisdiction,” Clark said. “I still think that our oversight hearings, backed up by the courts, is a strategy that is working and that we should maintain that course. But we're taking no tools off the table.”

Nadler, who has reportedly pressed Pelosi behind closed doors to launch an impeachment inquiry, said it's “premature to say” if he would have acted on a referral to his panel.

“I thought it was the wrong motion. ... I thought it should have been referred to the Judiciary Committee,” he said. “We're investigating the president, so I've said all options are on the table.”

Green, meanwhile, said he was encouraged by the growing support, versus the two measures he brought to the floor in the last Congress, and vowed to force votes on another resolution this cycle — if no one else does.

“The process isn't over,” he said after Wednesday's vote. “I've said all along this is not something I desire to do. But if it is not done by someone, then I will.

“The president, at some point, will be impeached,” he added.