House bill would make World Cup funds contingent on equal pay

House bill would make World Cup funds contingent on equal pay
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Two lawmakers on Tuesday introduced legislation that would withhold federal funds for the 2026 World Cup until the U.S. women’s national team is paid comparable wages to the men's team.

The Give Our Athletes Level Salaries (GOALS) Act, introduced by Reps. Doris MatsuiDoris Okada MatsuiDemocratic lawmaker calls telehealth expansion the 'silver lining' of pandemic The Hill's 12:30 Report: Delegates stage state-centric videos for the roll call Overnight Health Care: Obama leans into Trump criticism on coronavirus | CDC gives 3-month window for COVID-19 immunity MORE (D-Calif.) and Rosa DeLauroRosa Luisa DeLauroOvernight Health Care: CDC pulls revised guidance on coronavirus | Government watchdog finds supply shortages are harming US response | As virus pummels US, Europe sees its own spike Trump HHS official faces firestorm after attacks on scientists Ahead of a coronavirus vaccine, Mexico's drug pricing to have far-reaching impacts on Americans MORE (D-Conn.), would block all funds for the upcoming World Cup, set to be jointly hosted by the U.S., Mexico and Canada, until the pay structure is changed.

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“The U.S. Women’s National Team united our country and inspired the next generation of young women to pursue their dreams,” Matsui said in a statement.

“Most importantly, stars like Megan Rapinoe, Alex Morgan, and Rose Lavelle have used their stardom to elevate the issue of pay inequality in this country and inspire women across the nation to demand no less than what they deserve – equal pay for equal work,” she added.

The National Organization for Women (NOW) endorsed the measure. “We urge House members to join in co-sponsoring this legislation and hope that the GOALS Act is quickly adopted into law, and we look forward to working with Reps. Matsui and DeLauro on this important piece of legislation,” a spokesperson said in a statement.

The bill follows the introduction of a similar measure in the Senate by Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinSenate passes resolution reaffirming commitment to peaceful transition of power Hopes for DC, Puerto Rico statehood rise Manchin defends Supreme Court candidate Barrett: 'It's awful to bring in religion' MORE (D-W.Va.) shortly after the U.S. women's team won the World Cup earlier this month. Manchin said the bill was inspired by a letter from West Virginia University's women’s soccer head coach, Nikki Izzo-Brown.

The team itself filed a lawsuit against the United States Soccer Federation that accused the organization of “institutionalized gender discrimination.”

Documents indicate each player on the U.S. women’s team could receive a maximum of about $260,000 for winning the Women’s World Cup, while each player on the men’s team could receive nearly $1 million.