House panel to go to court to enforce McGahn subpoena, Nadler says

 House panel to go to court to enforce McGahn subpoena, Nadler says
© Getty Images

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerGOP memo deflects some gun questions to 'violence from the left' House Democrats urge Trump to end deportations of Iraqis after diabetic man's death French officials call for investigation of Epstein 'links with France' MORE (D-N.Y.) said Wednesday that the House panel will go to court this week to obtain requested grand jury material connected to former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony Kellyanne Conway: 'I'd like to know' if Mueller read his own report MORE’s Russia probe and to enforce a subpoena seeking the testimony of former White House counsel Don McGahn.

“The very next step, either tomorrow or Friday, is we’re going into court to ask for the grand jury material and to enforce the subpoena against Mr. McGahn,” Nadler said. 

ADVERTISEMENT

“That’s particularly important because the excuses ... that the White House gives for McGahn not testifying ... are the same excuses for all the other fact witnesses, and if we break that, we’ll break the logjam,” he continued. 

McGahn was subpoenaed by the House Judiciary Committee earlier this year to answer questions about Mueller's Russia probe before the House panel. However, President TrumpDonald John TrumpO'Rourke: Trump driving global, U.S. economy into recession Manchin: Trump has 'golden opportunity' on gun reforms Objections to Trump's new immigration rule wildly exaggerated MORE instructed McGahn to reject the subpoena in May, pointing to a Justice Department legal opinion that argued the former official was immune from giving congressional testimony. 

During Mueller’s sweeping two-year investigation, McGahn alleged to investigators that the president, on multiple occasions, instructed him to have the former special counsel fired, citing conflicts of interest.

Trump has disputed McGahn’s account several times, saying last month that he “was never going to fire Mueller” and never even “suggested firing” him.

"I don't care what [McGahn] says, it doesn't matter," Trump said at the time

McGahn is just one of a number of former Trump administration officials from whom the committee is seeking testimony as part of the probe. The committee has already issued subpoenas for testimony from former communications director Hope HicksHope Charlotte HicksHope Hicks defends accuracy of her congressional testimony Nadler subpoenas Lewandowski, former White House official for testimony House panel to go to court to enforce McGahn subpoena, Nadler says MORE, Trump senior adviser and son-in-law Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerDick Cheney to attend fundraiser supporting Trump reelection: report Trump Jr. dismisses conflicts of interest, touts projects in Indonesia Trump administration releases new 'public charge' rule making it easier to reject immigrants MORE and former national security adviser Michael Flynn.