House panel to go to court to enforce McGahn subpoena, Nadler says

 House panel to go to court to enforce McGahn subpoena, Nadler says
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House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerHouse Judiciary Committee postpones hearing with Barr amid coronavirus outbreak House Democrats plead with key committee chairman to allow remote voting amid coronavirus pandemic Pelosi rejects calls to shutter Capitol: 'We are the captains of this ship' MORE (D-N.Y.) said Wednesday that the House panel will go to court this week to obtain requested grand jury material connected to former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE’s Russia probe and to enforce a subpoena seeking the testimony of former White House counsel Don McGahn.

“The very next step, either tomorrow or Friday, is we’re going into court to ask for the grand jury material and to enforce the subpoena against Mr. McGahn,” Nadler said. 

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“That’s particularly important because the excuses ... that the White House gives for McGahn not testifying ... are the same excuses for all the other fact witnesses, and if we break that, we’ll break the logjam,” he continued. 

McGahn was subpoenaed by the House Judiciary Committee earlier this year to answer questions about Mueller's Russia probe before the House panel. However, President TrumpDonald John TrumpCampaigns face attack ad dilemma amid coronavirus crisis Outgoing inspector general says Trump fired him for carrying out his 'legal obligations' Trump hits Illinois governor after criticism: 'I hear him complaining all the time' MORE instructed McGahn to reject the subpoena in May, pointing to a Justice Department legal opinion that argued the former official was immune from giving congressional testimony. 

During Mueller’s sweeping two-year investigation, McGahn alleged to investigators that the president, on multiple occasions, instructed him to have the former special counsel fired, citing conflicts of interest.

Trump has disputed McGahn’s account several times, saying last month that he “was never going to fire Mueller” and never even “suggested firing” him.

"I don't care what [McGahn] says, it doesn't matter," Trump said at the time

McGahn is just one of a number of former Trump administration officials from whom the committee is seeking testimony as part of the probe. The committee has already issued subpoenas for testimony from former communications director Hope HicksHope Charlotte HicksMeadows joins White House facing reelection challenges Trump aide asked Cabinet agencies to identify anti-Trump appointees: report Trump unleashed: President moves with a free hand post-impeachment MORE, Trump senior adviser and son-in-law Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerCNN's Jake Tapper takes aim at Trump over coronavirus response: Do you have a plan? Private equity firm with ties to Kushner asks Trump administration to relax rules on loan program: report Decentralized leadership raises questions about Trump coronavirus response MORE and former national security adviser Michael Flynn.