House Democrat offers bill to let students with pot conviction retain federal aid

House Democrat offers bill to let students with pot conviction retain federal aid
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Rep. Bill FosterGeorge (Bill) William FosterHouse Democrat offers bill to let students with pot conviction retain federal aid New bill would restrict Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac from lobbying Pelosi joins other Dem leaders in support of Chicago Symphony Orchestra strikers MORE (D-Ill.) introduced a bill Friday aimed at helping people who have been convicted of minor marijuana offenses not lose their access to federal student aid. 

The measure would amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to allow those convicted of possession of marijuana without intent to distribute to retain access to aid for a six-month window while they “complete an approved drug rehabilitation program.”

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Under current law, a suspension of federal student aid is automatically triggered after an individual is convicted of a drug offense. 

Foster said the Second Chance for Students Act — co-sponsored by Democratic Reps. Gwen MooreGwen Sophia MooreHouse Democrat offers bill to let students with pot conviction retain federal aid House approves bill raising minimum wage to per hour Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment MORE (Wis.), Hank JohnsonHenry (Hank) C. JohnsonThe United States broken patent system is getting worse Why target Tucker Carlson? It's part of the left's war on the right The Hill's Morning Report - How will Trump be received in Dayton and El Paso? MORE (Ga.) and Seth MoultonSeth Wilbur MoultonNative American advocates question 2020 Democrats' commitment 2020 Democrats urge Israel to reverse decision banning Omar, Tlaib visit 2020 Democrats release joint statement ahead of Trump's New Hampshire rally MORE (Mass.), and Del. Eleanor Holmes NortonEleanor Holmes NortonHouse Democrat offers bill to let students with pot conviction retain federal aid Majority of Americans opposes DC statehood: poll DC statehood hearing rescheduled to make room for Mueller testimony MORE (D-D.C.) — was necessary to prevent individuals from derailing their futures “over one mistake.”

“For many students, financial aid can mean the difference between staying in school and dropping out,” Foster said in a statement. 

“This legislation would ensure that students stay in school while they complete the required rehabilitation program. No student should have their future determined by one bad choice.”

Moore argued the current law has a significantly negative impact on minority students, a policy she feels needs to change. 

“Losing financial aid can be devastating and often determines whether one can remain in school,” she said.  

“This policy harms students of color, who are often targeted for low-level offenses like marijuana possession. It’s why I am thrilled to support this bill because a marijuana conviction shouldn’t jeopardize a students’ future or access to educational opportunity.”