Four House Judiciary members say they will 'move forward' with impeachment

Four House Judiciary Committee Democrats said in a Friday op-ed that they will "move forward" with an impeachment effort against President TrumpDonald John TrumpSchiff pleads to Senate GOP: 'Right matters. And the truth matters.' Anita Hill to Iowa crowd: 'Statute of limitations' for Biden apology is 'up' Sen. Van Hollen releases documents from GAO investigation MORE.

Democratic Reps. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineHillicon Valley: Biden calls for revoking tech legal shield | DHS chief 'fully expects' Russia to try to interfere in 2020 | Smaller companies testify against Big Tech 'monopoly power' Smaller companies testify against Big Tech's 'monopoly power' Living in limbo may end for Liberians in the US MORE (R.I.), Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalSanders announces Iowa campaign swing with AOC, Michael Moore Lawmakers introduce bill to reform controversial surveillance authorities Sanders wants one-on-one fight with Biden MORE (Wash.), Mary Gay ScanlonMary Gay ScanlonOvernight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Buttigieg targets Warren, Sanders on health care ahead of debate | Judge overturns ObamaCare transgender protections | Poll sees support drop for 'Medicare for All' Lewandowski refuses to say whether Trump has offered him a pardon Four House Judiciary members say they will 'move forward' with impeachment MORE (Pa.) and Veronica EscobarVeronica EscobarThe Hill's Morning Report - House prosecutes Trump as 'lawless,' 'corrupt' Overnight Defense: Dems raise pressure on Esper to block border wall funds | Trump impeachment trial begins in Senate | Day one dominated by fight over rules Democrats press Trump administration to stop DNA collection from detained migrants MORE (Texas) wrote in an op-ed published in The Atlantic that after former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSchiff: Trump acquittal in Senate trial would not signal a 'failure' Jeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay MORE’s testimony on Capitol Hill this week, “it is up to Congress to act.”

"Our investigation will seriously examine all the evidence as we consider whether to bring articles of impeachment or other remedies under our Article I powers," the four Democrats wrote. “Our Constitution requires it. Our democracy depends on it.”

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The lawmakers noted that the Judiciary panel has filed an application in court to obtain grand jury documents referenced in Mueller’s report, adding they plan to obtain “additional underlying evidence, as well as enforce subpoenas for key witness testimony, and broaden our investigations to include conflicts of interest and financial misconduct.”

“Congress has patiently tried to work within traditional means to get to the bottom of this extraordinary situation,” the lawmakers wrote. "Committees have called witnesses and requested evidence, only to be stonewalled by Trump and his associates. The president’s refusal to comply with the Constitution, statutes, and established congressional oversight defies the rule of law."

The Democrats called Mueller’s testimony before the House Judiciary and Intelligence panels this week a “watershed moment” that came three months after his team released its 448-page report detailing findings from its two-year investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible obstruction of justice by Trump.

“When the redacted report finally became available to Congress and the American people, it painted a damning picture of a corrupt president who welcomed and encouraged an attack on our country, capitalized on it, and then tried to cover up what he had done,” the lawmakers wrote. “At this point, it is up to Congress to act on the evidence of multiple counts of obstruction of justice committed by the president, and to continue our investigation into whether he has committed other high crimes and misdemeanors.”

While Mueller’s testimony revealed little new information, House Democrats have signaled they are moving forward with lawsuits and subpoenas in the wake of the testimony, even as their caucus remains divided over launching an impeachment inquiry into the president.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerSusan Collins asked Justice Roberts to intervene after Nadler late-night 'cover-up' accusation Nadler gets under GOP's skin Restlessness, light rule-breaking and milk spotted on Senate floor as impeachment trial rolls on MORE (D-N.Y.) has said the panel is seeking the underlying Mueller evidence and that lawmakers would decide whether to recommend articles of impeachment against Trump.