Wave of Washington state lawmakers call for impeachment proceedings against Trump

A wave of lawmakers from the state of Washington on Sunday called for an impeachment inquiry against President TrumpDonald John TrumpFive landmark moments of testimony to Congress Lindsey Graham basks in the impeachment spotlight Democrats sharpen their message on impeachment MORE, making it so that nearly half of the House Democratic Caucus now supports the move.

The call from the five Washington state Democrats — Reps. Derek KilmerDerek Christian KilmerProgressive freshmen jump into leadership PAC fundraising Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to testify on Libra | Extremists find home on Telegram app | Warren blasts Facebook for not removing anti-Biden ad | California outlaws facial recognition in police body cameras | China rips US tech sanctions House Democrats introduce new legislation to combat foreign election interference MORE, Kim SchrierKimberly (Kim) Merle SchrierSwing-seat Democrats oppose impeachment, handing Pelosi leverage Second Democrat representing Trump district backs impeachment House Democrats inch toward majority support for impeachment MORE, Suzan DelBeneSuzan Kay DelBeneModerate Democratic lawmakers back privacy bill favored by businesses The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by National Association of Manufacturers - Trump, Congress draw battle lines on impeachment Lawmakers beat Capitol Police in Congressional Football Game MORE and Denny HeckDennis (Denny) Lynn HeckExclusive: Guccifer 2.0 hacked memos expand on Pennsylvania House races Heck enjoys second political wind Incoming lawmaker feeling a bit overwhelmed MORE as well as Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayRetirement bill blocked in Senate amid fight over amendments Senate Democrats call on White House to abandon plan to collect DNA from migrants Overnight Health Care: Judge temporarily blocks Alabama near-total abortion ban | Sanders dismisses calls for 'Medicare for All' funding plan | Dems urge Trump not to back down on vaping flavor ban MORE — came four days after former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSpeier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump Gowdy: I '100 percent' still believe public congressional hearings are 'a circus' Comey: Mueller 'didn't succeed in his mission because there was inadequate transparency' MORE testified to Congress.

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Although Mueller revealed little that wasn't already included in his 448-page report on Russian interference in the 2016 election, 11 lawmakers have moved to begin supporting an impeachment inquiry since the testimony.

The investigation did not find sufficient evidence to prove conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Russia during the election, and it neither implicated nor cleared Trump on the question of obstruction of justice.

Trump touted the hearings as a success, declaring the “phony cloud” cast by the investigation had been lifted and insisted “there was no defense to this ridiculous hoax, this witch hunt.”

Over the weekend, however, he took aim at House Oversight and Reform Chairman Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsMaya Rockeymoore Cummings, Elijah Cummings's widow, will run for his House seat Former NAACP president to run for Cummings's House seat Elijah Cummings's widow 'thinking carefully' about running for his old seat MORE (D-Md.), an African American lawmaker whose committee is conducting several investigations into the Trump administration. Trump's comments about Cummings and the city of Baltimore were widely condemned by Democrats as racist.

Under Cummings, the committee has voted to hold Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrGiuliani considers launching impeachment podcast The Hill's Morning Report - Impeachment drama will dominate this week Impeachment tests Barr-Trump relationship MORE and Commerce Secretary Wilbur RossWilbur Louis RossTrump trade adviser pushes back on reports of US-China tariff deal China, US agree to reduce tariffs amid trade talks, Beijing says Income for poorest Americans fell faster than previously thought: study MORE in contempt for defying subpoenas; heard testimony from former Trump attorney Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenBroadcast, cable news networks to preempt regular programming for Trump impeachment coverage DOJ releases hundreds of pages of memos from Mueller probe Scaramucci visits Cohen in prison MORE; held a hearing on conditions at the southern border; and last week authorized a subpoena for official communications from senior White House advisers Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie TrumpIvanka Trump: Whistleblower identity 'not particularly relevant' The Hill's Morning Report - What Bevin's apparent loss in Kentucky means Man pleads guilty in plot to attack Cleveland on July 4 MORE and Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerHaley: Top Trump aides tried to get me to undermine him Man pleads guilty in plot to attack Cleveland on July 4 Progressives press Democrats to rethink Israel policy MORE.

It marked the second time in three weeks that Trump targeted a prominent minority Democratic lawmaker and in many ways mirrored the way his attacks on Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezSanders 'very concerned about what appears to be a coup' in Bolivia Trump celebrates resignation of Bolivia's president Sanders touts big crowds in Iowa rallies with Ocasio-Cortez MORE (D-N.Y.), Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarSanders 'very concerned about what appears to be a coup' in Bolivia Overnight Defense: Protests at Trump's NYC Veterans Day speech | House Dems release Pentagon official's deposition transcript | Lawmakers ask Trump to rescind Erdogan invite Ilhan Omar blasts Pete King as an 'Islamophobe' after he announces retirement: 'Good riddance' MORE (D-Minn.), Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibSanders: Fighting anti-Semitism 'is very personal' Bloomberg run should push Warren to the center — but won't Justice Democrats official denies that progressives struggle with electability MORE (D-Minn.) and Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyJustice Democrats official denies that progressives struggle with electability The Hill's Campaign Report: Bloomberg looks to upend Democratic race Progressive freshmen jump into leadership PAC fundraising MORE (D-Mass.) played out.

Another key committee leader, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerHouse to vote on bill to ensure citizenship for children of overseas service members As impeachment goes public, forget 'conventional wisdom' What this 'impeachment' is really about — and it's not the Constitution MORE (D-N.Y.), on Sunday said that Trump "richly deserves impeachment" but stopped short of joining a growing call for House Democrats to begin a formal inquiry.

"My personal view is that [Trump] richly deserves impeachment. He has done many impeachable offenses. He's violated the laws six ways from Sunday," Nadler said on CNN's "State of the Union."

The four Washington state representatives, who all cited Mueller's report in their statements, bring the total number of House Democrats calling for impeachment proceedings up to 103, just 15 shy of a majority of the House Democratic Caucus.

Murray, the No. 3 Democrat in the Senate, said in a statement that “as we have learned more about the gravity of the potential threats to our democracy identified in Special Counsel Mueller’s report, it has become clear the House should begin proceedings to determine whether the President’s actions necessitate impeachment.”

Democratic leadership has so far been hesitant, instead asking the caucus to focus on investigations and oversight.

House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDemocrats sharpen their message on impeachment Congress hunts for path out of spending stalemate Siren song of impeachment lures Democrats toward election doom MORE (Calif.) said Friday that she has no problem with individual Democrats calling for impeachment despite her reservations about moving forward with the process.

"Their advocacy for impeachment only gives me leverage. I have no complaint with what they are doing," she said.