Wave of Washington state lawmakers call for impeachment proceedings against Trump

A wave of lawmakers from the state of Washington on Sunday called for an impeachment inquiry against President TrumpDonald John TrumpWarren: Dershowitz presentation 'nonsensical,' 'could not follow it' Bolton told Barr he was concerned Trump did favors for autocrats: report Dershowitz: Bolton allegations would not constitute impeachable offense MORE, making it so that nearly half of the House Democratic Caucus now supports the move.

The call from the five Washington state Democrats — Reps. Derek KilmerDerek Christian KilmerHouse extends Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress for another year Progressive freshmen jump into leadership PAC fundraising Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to testify on Libra | Extremists find home on Telegram app | Warren blasts Facebook for not removing anti-Biden ad | California outlaws facial recognition in police body cameras | China rips US tech sanctions MORE, Kim SchrierKimberly (Kim) Merle SchrierThe most expensive congressional races of the last decade The Hill's Morning Report - Vulnerable Dems are backing Trump impeachment Vulnerable Democrats signal support for impeachment articles this week MORE, Suzan DelBeneSuzan Kay DelBeneCongressional authority in a time of Trump executive overreach Moderate Democratic lawmakers back privacy bill favored by businesses The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by National Association of Manufacturers - Trump, Congress draw battle lines on impeachment MORE and Denny HeckDennis (Denny) Lynn HeckExclusive: Guccifer 2.0 hacked memos expand on Pennsylvania House races Heck enjoys second political wind Incoming lawmaker feeling a bit overwhelmed MORE as well as Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayOvernight Health Care: Trump becomes first sitting president to attend March for Life | Officials confirm second US case of coronavirus | Trump officials threaten California funding over abortion law Top health officials brief senators on coronavirus as infections spread Administration to give Senate briefing on coronavirus MORE — came four days after former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSchiff: Trump acquittal in Senate trial would not signal a 'failure' Jeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay MORE testified to Congress.

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Although Mueller revealed little that wasn't already included in his 448-page report on Russian interference in the 2016 election, 11 lawmakers have moved to begin supporting an impeachment inquiry since the testimony.

The investigation did not find sufficient evidence to prove conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Russia during the election, and it neither implicated nor cleared Trump on the question of obstruction of justice.

Trump touted the hearings as a success, declaring the “phony cloud” cast by the investigation had been lifted and insisted “there was no defense to this ridiculous hoax, this witch hunt.”

Over the weekend, however, he took aim at House Oversight and Reform Chairman Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsBaltimore unveils plaques for courthouse to be named after Elijah Cummings GOP leaders encourage retiring lawmakers to give up committee posts Pelosi taps Virginia Democrat for key post on economic panel MORE (D-Md.), an African American lawmaker whose committee is conducting several investigations into the Trump administration. Trump's comments about Cummings and the city of Baltimore were widely condemned by Democrats as racist.

Under Cummings, the committee has voted to hold Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrBolton told Barr he was concerned Trump did favors for autocrats: report DOJ says surveillance of Trump campaign adviser Page lacked evidence Senators press DHS over visa approval for Pensacola naval base shooter MORE and Commerce Secretary Wilbur RossWilbur Louis RossThe Hill's Morning Report - Report of Bolton tell-all manuscript roils Trump defense 'In any other administration': Trump's novel strategy for dealing with scandal Desperate Democrats badmouth economy even as it booms MORE in contempt for defying subpoenas; heard testimony from former Trump attorney Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenCNN's Axelrod says impeachment didn't come up until 80 minutes into focus group The Hill's 12:30 Report: Democrats turn to obstruction charge Juan Williams: Counting the votes to remove Trump MORE; held a hearing on conditions at the southern border; and last week authorized a subpoena for official communications from senior White House advisers Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie TrumpOvernight Energy: Study finds 'forever chemicals' in more locations | Trump officials approve Keystone XL pipeline right-of-way | Warren asks banks for climate plans Gore praises Greta Thunberg after meeting: 'Nobody speaks truth to power as she does' Ivanka Trump refuses to criticize Greta Thunberg: 'She's elevated awareness' MORE and Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerTrump to release Israeli-Palestinian peace plan on Tuesday Suspicions cloud Trump's Middle East peace plan Hillicon Valley — Presented by Philip Morris International — Wyden asks NSA to investigate White House cybersecurity | Commerce withdraws Huawei rule after Pentagon objects | Warren calls on Brazil to drop Greenwald charges MORE.

It marked the second time in three weeks that Trump targeted a prominent minority Democratic lawmaker and in many ways mirrored the way his attacks on Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOcasio-Cortez rips 'public charge' decision: 'The American Dream isn't a private club with a cover charge' Democrat questions new border chief's involvement in Facebook group with racist, sexist posts The DCCC's 'blacklist' protects a white male political status quo MORE (D-N.Y.), Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarBiden leads 2020 pack in congressional endorsements Sanders wants one-on-one fight with Biden Jayapal: 'We will end up with another Donald Trump' if the US doesn't elect a progressive MORE (D-Minn.), Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibBiden leads 2020 pack in congressional endorsements Sanders wants one-on-one fight with Biden Democrats press Trump administration to stop DNA collection from detained migrants MORE (D-Minn.) and Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyThe DCCC's 'blacklist' protects a white male political status quo Biden leads 2020 pack in congressional endorsements The Hill's Morning Report — Dems detail case to remove Trump for abuse of power MORE (D-Mass.) played out.

Another key committee leader, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerPelosi says House will vote on bill to repeal travel ban Nadler to miss a day of impeachment trial due to wife's cancer treatment Impeachment manager dismisses concerns Schiff alienated key Republican votes: 'This isn't about any one person' MORE (D-N.Y.), on Sunday said that Trump "richly deserves impeachment" but stopped short of joining a growing call for House Democrats to begin a formal inquiry.

"My personal view is that [Trump] richly deserves impeachment. He has done many impeachable offenses. He's violated the laws six ways from Sunday," Nadler said on CNN's "State of the Union."

The four Washington state representatives, who all cited Mueller's report in their statements, bring the total number of House Democrats calling for impeachment proceedings up to 103, just 15 shy of a majority of the House Democratic Caucus.

Murray, the No. 3 Democrat in the Senate, said in a statement that “as we have learned more about the gravity of the potential threats to our democracy identified in Special Counsel Mueller’s report, it has become clear the House should begin proceedings to determine whether the President’s actions necessitate impeachment.”

Democratic leadership has so far been hesitant, instead asking the caucus to focus on investigations and oversight.

House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiHouse passes bill aimed at bolstering Holocaust education Hillicon Valley — Presented by Philip Morris International — NFL social media accounts hacked | Dem questions border chief over controversial Facebook group | Clinton says Zuckerberg has 'authoritarian' views Meadows: Republicans who break with Trump could face political repercussions MORE (Calif.) said Friday that she has no problem with individual Democrats calling for impeachment despite her reservations about moving forward with the process.

"Their advocacy for impeachment only gives me leverage. I have no complaint with what they are doing," she said.