Sharpton: Trump has 'particular venom' for blacks, people of color

The Rev. Al Sharpton on Monday called out President TrumpDonald John TrumpDavid Axelrod after Ginsburg cancer treatment: Supreme Court vacancy could 'tear this country apart' EU says it will 'respond in kind' if US slaps tariffs on France Ginsburg again leaves Supreme Court with an uncertain future MORE for his rhetoric when referring to people of color after the president's recent attacks on the city of Baltimore. 

"He attacks everybody. I know Donald Trump, he’s not mature enough to take criticism ... he’s like a child," Sharpton said at the news conference in Charm City. "But he has a particular venom for blacks and people of color." 

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"He attacks [Speaker] Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi asks Democrats for 'leverage' on impeachment Is there internet life after thirty? Pelosi says Dems 'have to be ready to throw a punch — for the children' in 2020 MORE, he attacks [Senate Democratic Leader] Chuck SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerJewish Democratic congresswoman and veteran blasts Trump's 'disloyalty' comments Schumer says Trump encouraging anti-Semites Saagar Enjeti: Biden's latest blunder; Krystal Ball: Did Schumer blow our chance to beat McConnell? MORE, he attacks other whites, but he never said that their districts or their states are places that no human beings want to live," Sharpton, the founder of the nonprofit National Action Network, said, citing Trump's criticism of the city as violent.

Sharpton said Monday's National Action Network conference, which was previously planned and came after Trump spent the weekend attacking Rep. Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsGOP Oversight report says Interior head met with group tied to former clients Nadler asks other House chairs to provide records that would help panel in making impeachment decision Nikki Haley voices 'complete support' for Pence MORE (D-Md.) and the city of Baltimore in a series of tweets, was not a "partisan effort."

At the conference, former Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele also spoke about Trump's rhetoric. 

"Little did I know that Mr. Trump was going to, on the eve of this, attack the congressman from this city — and not only the congressman but the people of this city — in the most bigoted and racist way," Sharpton said. 

Trump lashed out at Baltimore and Cummings this weekend, calling the city "disgusting" and "rodent infested" and saying the longtime lawmaker has done "so little" for its residents. 

Trump later doubled down on his attacks and said there was "nothing racist" about the tweets, while lashing out at Cummings and calling him a racist.

Trump continued his attacks before the news conference Monday, calling Sharpton a "troublemaker" and a "con man" who "hates whites." 

Sharpton said that Trump can "say what he wants."

"Call me a troublemaker. Yes, I make trouble for bigots," Sharpton said, noting he's sparred with Trump for 25 years over the Central Park jogger case and birtherism. "As far as me being a con man, if he really thought I was a con man he'd be nominating me for his Cabinet."

He also defended Cummings.

"Elijah Cummings is a respected and well-regarded member of Congress," Sharpton said. "And for him to be angry at Mr. Cummings because Mr. Cummings has the moral standard to question how migrant children are being treated at the border is an abomination to me."

The tweets attacking Cummings followed the president's recent attacks directed at freshman Democratic Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.), Rashida Tlaib (Mich.), Ilhan Omar (Minn.) and Ayanna Pressley (Mass.), all of whom are women of color.

Trump said the lawmakers should “go back” to the “totally broken and crime infested places from which they came.”