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Pelosi vows no UK free trade deal if Brexit undermines Good Friday accord

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOvernight Defense: Capitol Police may ask National Guard to stay | Biden's Pentagon policy nominee faces criticism | Naval Academy midshipmen moved to hotels Top Republican: 'Outrageous' to extend National Guard deployment at Capitol Progressives won't oppose bill over limits on stimulus checks MORE (D-Calif.) on Wednesday reiterated her opposition to a free trade deal with the United Kingdom if its withdrawal from the European Union harms Irish peace.

“The Good Friday Agreement serves as the bedrock of peace in Northern Ireland and as a beacon of hope for the entire world.  After centuries of conflict and bloodshed, the world has witnessed a miracle of reconciliation and progress made possible because of this transformative accord," she said in a statement.

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“If Brexit undermines the Good Friday accord, there will be no chance of a U.S.-U.K. trade agreement passing the Congress. The peace of the Good Friday Agreement is treasured by the American people and will be fiercely defended on a bicameral and bipartisan basis in the United States Congress.”

The 1998 Good Friday Agreement ended the Northern Ireland conflict, which broke out in the 1960s.

Dealing with Northern Ireland has been a central issue for Brexit negotiators.

Northern Ireland, which is part of the U.K., shares a border with Ireland, which is part of the EU.

Critics of Brexit have raised concerns that a deal might require imposing a hard border between Northern Ireland and Ireland, upsetting the agreement that has maintained peace for over two decades.

Pelosi's remarks come after national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonTrump offered North Korea's Kim a ride home on Air Force One: report Key impeachment figure Pence sticks to sidelines Bolton lawyer: Trump impeachment trial is constitutional MORE said that the U.S. would support a "no deal" Brexit, which would likely trigger the hard border. Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyGarland's AG nomination delayed by GOP roadblocks National Sheriffs' Association backs Biden pick for key DOJ role Bipartisan group of senators introduces bill to rein in Biden's war powers MORE (R-Iowa) also recently said he would support a no-deal exit.

Any new trade deal to substitute the U.S.-U.K. agreements negotiated through the EU would have to be brought to a vote in Congress, meaning the Speaker could block it.

The California lawmaker had originally voiced her opposition to a no deal Brexit to Irish Parliament in April.

Since then, British Prime Minister Theresa MayTheresa Mary MayThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden takes office, calls for end to 'uncivil war' Money talks: Why China is beating America in Asia China is winning the war for global tech dominance MORE has been replaced by Boris Johnson, an ardent Brexit supporter.

The former London mayor has promised to leave the European Union by Oct. 31, but faces several roadblocks in negotiations. 

— This report was updated at 9:13 a.m.