King incites furor with abortion, rape and incest remarks

Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingHouse passes bill that would give legal status to thousands of undocumented farmworkers Juan Williams: Stephen Miller must be fired Why the GOP march of mad hatters poses a threat to our Democracy MORE (R-Iowa) sparked a new uproar Wednesday after making incendiary comments about rape and incest, with Democrats — including multiple presidential candidates — rushing to condemn the controversial lawmaker.

King made the remarks while speaking to the Westside Conservative Club in Urbandale, Iowa, on Wednesday, where he sought to defend anti-abortion legislation with no rape or incest exceptions. “What if we went back through all the family trees and just pulled out anyone who was a product of rape or incest? Would there be any population of the world left if we did that?" the lawmaker said.

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“Considering all the wars and all the rapes and pillages that happened throughout all these different nations, I know that I can't say that I was not a part of a product of that,” he added.

House GOP Conference Chairwoman Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyGOP calls for minority hearing on impeachment, threatens procedural measures Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Stopgap spending bill includes military pay raise | Schumer presses Pentagon to protect impeachment witnesses | US ends civil-nuclear waiver in Iran Cruz, Graham and Cheney call on Trump to end all nuclear waivers for Iran MORE (Wyo.) tore into the Iowa Republican, suggesting his past and recent remarks made him unfit for Congress.

"As I’ve said before, it’s time for him to go. The people of Iowa’s 4th congressional district deserve better," Cheney said.

The comments drew swift condemnation from Democratic lawmakers, including multiple presidential candidates. Sens. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandAdvocacy groups decry Trump's 'anti-family policies' ahead of White House summit This bipartisan plan is the most progressive approach to paid parental leave Bombshell Afghanistan report bolsters calls for end to 'forever wars' MORE (N.Y.) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Julián Castro jabs ICE: 'Delete your account' Booker campaign unveils bilingual training program for Nevada caucus MORE (N.J.), who were among the first to respond, called for King to resign.  

"You are a disgrace," Gillibrand said in a tweet, linking to the article from the Des Moines Register, which was first to report King's comments.

Booker also used the comments to encourage donations to J.D. Scholten, King's challenger in 2018, who has announced a new bid to unseat the congressman in 2020. 

Other Democrats were quick to follow. 

“You would think it would be pretty easy to come out against rape and incest. Then again, you'd think it'd be pretty easy to come out against white nationalism,” South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Warren, Buttigieg duke it out in sprint to 2020 Krystal Ball warns about lagging youth support for Buttigieg MORE said in response to questions from reporters in Iowa.

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“So this is just one more example why there needs to be a sane representative in that district, and that's why I think J.D. Scholten will be an excellent public servant for people of that district,” he added.

“Steve King is a racist, a misogynist and a disgrace to the country,” Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Warren, Buttigieg duke it out in sprint to 2020 The Memo: Pelosi-Trump trade deal provokes debate on left MORE (I-Vt.) tweeted Wednesday afternoon. “He should not be a member of the United States Congress.”

Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas) also encouraged supporters to donate to Scholten and tweeted “no matter where you live, you know there’s no place for Steve King’s racism, bigotry, and hatred in Congress.”

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Warren, Buttigieg duke it out in sprint to 2020 The Memo: Pelosi-Trump trade deal provokes debate on left MORE (D-Mass.) lambasted King's comment as a "disgusting attack on victims of sexual assault," calling on the congressman to resign.

"Steve King must resign. His latest comment is a disgusting attack on victims of sexual assault. The people of #IA04 deserve better. We must work together to elect @JDScholten in 2020," she tweeted.

Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro said King had “time and time again … embarrassed himself and denigrated his office,” while Montana Gov. Steve BullockSteve BullockThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democrats worry about diversity on next debate stage The Hill's Morning Report — Pelosi makes it official: Trump will be impeached Steve Bullock exits: Will conservative Democrats follow? MORE (D) also encouraged donations to Scholten, tweeting “Every woman has the right over her own body — and voters have the right to reject this man for good.”

In a statement, former Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin DelaneyThe great AI debate: What candidates are (finally) saying about artificial intelligence Delaney to DNC: Open second debate stage for candidates who qualified for past events Krystal Ball: What Harris's exit means for the other 2020 candidates MORE’s (D-Md.) presidential campaign also excoriated the comments.

“Steve King’s comments were vile, repulsive, and unsurprising. Based on his words and actions, Steve King has made very clear who he is and what he believes. His beliefs and his actions run contrary to everything that Congressman Delaney believes and stands for,” the statement reads.

“That is why Congressman Delaney called for Steve King to resign in January” following the white supremacy comments, the statement adds.

Several of King’s Democratic colleagues in the House also expressed disgust at his comments.

“This is a disgusting interpretation of history, and an embarrassment to the Republican Party,” Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaOvernight Defense: House passes compromise defense bill | Turkey sanctions advance in Senate over Trump objections | Top general says military won't be 'raping, burning and pillaging' after Trump pardons House passes defense bill to establish Space Force, paid family leave for federal workers Bombshell Afghanistan report bolsters calls for end to 'forever wars' MORE (D-Calif.) tweeted. “Humanity exists in spite of those kinds of horrific actions: not because of them.”

“Gross! This would explain why these weirdos are fixed on smearing me with claims of incest,” tweeted Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarBiden narrowly ahead in Iowa as Sanders surges, Warren drops: poll Sanders, Omar to hit campaign trail in New Hampshire House approves two-state resolution in implicit rebuke of Trump MORE (D-Minn.), referencing a baseless conspiracy theory that claims she married her brother to commit immigration fraud.

Rep. Karen BassKaren Ruth BassParties clash as impeachment articles move closer to House vote Democratic lawmaker open to pursuing impeachment again if Trump wins in 2020 The US treats asylum seekers so poorly MORE (D-Calif.) also called on King to resign, saying that King making the remarks in support of banning all forms of abortion is “the most despicable part” of his comments.

King was previously stripped of his committee assignments after asking in an interview with The New York Times, "White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive?”

King has made other remarks in the past that have raised eyebrows on both racial issues — such as tweeting “we can’t restore our civilization with somebody else’s babies” — and on the issue of rape, falsely claiming in 2012 that it was “not against the law” for a man to rape and kidnap a 13-year-old girl and force her to get an abortion.

King also defended similar comments in 2012 from then-Senate candidate former Rep. Todd Akin (R-Mo.), who said women’s bodies could “shut that whole thing down” in the event of a “legitimate rape.”

The Hill has reached out to King's office for comment.

—Updated at 4:58 p.m.