Ocasio-Cortez blasts Electoral College as a 'scam'

First-term Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezWill Democrats attempt to pack the Supreme Court again? On The Money: Anxious Democrats push for vote on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi, Mnuchin ready to restart talks | Weekly jobless claims increase | Senate treads close to shutdown deadline McCarthy says there will be a peaceful transition if Biden wins MORE (D-N.Y.) is calling for the U.S. to abolish the Electoral College, saying that the voting system is a "scam" that negatively impacts minorities. 

Ocasio-Cortez made her argument on Monday in an Instagram story that includes her driving along a deserted highway and quipping, "many votes here, as you can see."

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"Very efficient way to choose leadership of the country. I mean I can’t think of any other way, can you?" Ocasio-Cortez says, before going on to cite a report from New York Magazine that argues the defenses of the system that determines the winner of presidential elections are flawed.

The freshman lawmaker said the Electoral College is a "scam" that has a "racial injustice breakdown" undermining the votes of people of color. 

"Due to severe racial disparities in certain states, the Electoral College effectively weighs white voters over voters of color, as apposed to a 'one person, one vote' system where all our votes are counted equally," she says, before pushing back against the argument that eliminating the Electoral College would give big states too much power. 

"Could you image if we had this kind democracy-altering 'fairness' provision for literally any other group?" she asks. "If we weighed, for example, black and indigenous voters more because of unfairness?" 

Ocasio-Cortez later asserts that plenty of Republicans live in Democratic-leaning states, saying that their votes would count equally in a popular vote. 

"Facts are facts America," Ocasio-Cortez concludes. "The Electoral College has to go."

The extended riff from the congresswoman comes as abolishing the Electoral College gains increasing traction, with several Democratic-leaning states entering a National Popular Vote interstate compact that calls for members to allocate their Electoral College vote to the candidate that wins the national popular vote.

The compact cannot go into effect until the coalition includes states that accumulate at least 270 electoral votes.

Multiple Democratic presidential candidates, including Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOvernight Defense: Appeals court revives House lawsuit against military funding for border wall | Dems push for limits on transferring military gear to police | Lawmakers ask for IG probe into Pentagon's use of COVID-19 funds On The Money: Half of states deplete funds for Trump's 0 unemployment expansion | EU appealing ruling in Apple tax case | House Democrats include more aid for airlines in coronavirus package Warren, Khanna request IG investigation into Pentagon's use of coronavirus funds MORE (D-Mass.) and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegBillionaire who donated to Trump in 2016 donates to Biden The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - GOP closes ranks to fill SCOTUS vacancy by November Buttigieg stands in as Pence for Harris's debate practice MORE, have also come out in support of eliminating the Electoral College. 

Many proponents of abolishing the system have pointed to President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden says voters should choose who nominates Supreme Court justice Trump, Biden will not shake hands at first debate due to COVID-19 Pelosi: Trump Supreme Court pick 'threatens' Affordable Care Act MORE's 2016 Electoral College victory over Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe Memo: Trump furor stokes fears of unrest Bloomberg rolls out M ad buy to boost Biden in Florida Hillicon Valley: Productivity, fatigue, cybersecurity emerge as top concerns amid pandemic | Facebook critics launch alternative oversight board | Google to temporarily bar election ads after polls close MORE despite losing the popular vote. A similar scenario occurred in 2000, when President George W. Bush won the Electoral College after the disputed contest in Florida, even as he lost the popular vote to Democrat Al Gore.

Many Republican lawmakers have dismissed the movement. Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamHarris slams Trump's Supreme Court pick as an attempt to 'destroy the Affordable Care Act' Sunday shows preview: Lawmakers prepare for SCOTUS confirmation hearings before election Confirmation hearing for Trump's Supreme Court pick to start Oct. 12 MORE (R-S.C.) said earlier this year that the push was "driven by the idea [that] Democrats want rural America to go away politically."