Scalise says it's unclear if bipartisan deal on guns will happen

Scalise says it's unclear if bipartisan deal on guns will happen
© Greg Nash

House Minority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseScalise blasts Democratic legislation on gun reforms Liz Cheney calls for 'proportional military response' against Iran On The Money: Senate panel scraps vote on key spending bill amid standoff | Democrats threaten to vote against defense bill over wall funding | Trump set to meet with aides about reducing capital gains taxes MORE (R-La.) said it’s unclear whether lawmakers can reach a bipartisan deal on gun legislation following a meeting with fellow Republican leaders at the White House on Tuesday.

The Louisiana Republican said while "good faith negotiations and conversations" are taking place between parties and chambers, he doesn’t feel the bills Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTimeline: The Trump whistleblower complaint DC statehood push faces long odds despite record support Ukraine could badly damage both Donald Trump and the Democrats MORE (D-Calif.) has advocated for the Senate to take up would prevent future instances of mass violence. Scalise said Tuesday’s talks centered around both potential new measures aimed at preventing future shootings and improving the implementation of current laws.

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"We talked about some of the things that still need to be done to make the background check system work better, making current laws work better. There are a lot of gaps in our current laws where people are able to buy guns, who shouldn't have been able to buy guns that had criminal records and other things that weren't getting fed into the background check system," he told reporters following the meeting.

"And so we passed a law to make that work better. He's looking at, you know, what might be other laws that he can get an agreement on, but the other concern is, you know, do the Democrats actually want to solve problems or do they want to just be more aggressive about taking away people's guns."

Scalise’s comments come as lawmakers and the White House attempt to figure out the next steps toward crafting gun policies in the wake of two mass shootings that took place last month.

Pelosi has pushed for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDC statehood push faces long odds despite record support Overnight Energy: California, 23 other states sue Trump over vehicle emissions rule | Climate strike protests hit cities across globe | Interior watchdog expands scope of FOIA investigation | Dems accuse officials of burying climate reports Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers say Zuckerberg to 'cooperate' on antitrust probes | Dems see victory after McConnell backs election security funds | Twitter takes down fake pro-Saudi accounts MORE (R-Ky.) to bring House-passed universal background checks legislation, which faces an uphill battle in the Republican-controlled upper chamber.

Sens. Toomey (R-Pa.)has crafted proposals with both Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinO'Rourke gun confiscation talk alarms Democrats Clarence Thomas, Joe Manchin, Rudy Giuliani among guests at second state visit under Trump Schumer: I don't know any 'Democrat who agrees' with O'Rourke on gun seizures MORE (D-W.V.) and Chris CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsSenate committee approves 0 million for state election security efforts Media and candidates should be ashamed that they don't talk about obesity Bill to return B in unredeemed bonds advances MORE (D-Del.), but it remains uncertain whether either plan can garner enough support or the support of the administration.

"We had a lengthy discussion about the fall agenda and there's no announcements to come out of it. We talked about the things you would expect us to talk about—the appropriations process, the possibility of gun legislation, and it was a good discussion," McConnell told reporters following the meeting.

Asked if he liked what he was hearing in the gun discussion, McConnell didn't answer as the elevator doors closed.

Jordain Carney contributed.