Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020

Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020
© Greg Nash

More than 30 lawmakers have announced they won't seek reelection in 2020.

In the House, 25 Republicans are heading for the doors, compared with just eight Democrats. Rep. Chris CollinsChristopher (Chris) Carl CollinsHouse passes bill to explicitly ban insider trading Duncan Hunter pleads guilty after changing plea On The Money: Economy adds 136K jobs in September | Jobless rate at 50-year low | Treasury IG to probe handling of Trump tax returns request | House presses Zuckerberg to testify on digital currency MORE (R-N.Y.) resigned from Congress effective Oct. 1, 2019.

On the Senate side, four GOP senators aren't seeking another term, while only one Democrat has said the same.

ADVERTISEMENT

Below is a list of who is retiring from Congress, who is vacating their seat to seek office elsewhere and who will leave before their term is up.

This list will be updated whenever a lawmaker announces a retirement or resignation.

RECENT UPDATES: Rep. Ted YohoTheodore (Ted) Scott YohoThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - An unusual day: Impeachment plus a trade deal GOP's Yoho announces retirement from Congress Haley: Giuliani should've been named 'special envoy' to Ukraine MORE (R-Fla.).

 

HOUSE REPUBLICANS

Bradley ByrneBradley Roberts ByrneSessions leads GOP Senate primary field in Alabama, internal poll shows Israeli, Palestinian business leaders seek Trump boost for investment project Sessions vows to 'work for' Trump endorsement MORE (Ala.)

Byrne announced in February 2019 that he will run for the Senate in 2020. He will attempt to unseat Sen. Doug Jones, the Democratic incumbent.

ADVERTISEMENT

Rob BishopRobert (Rob) William BishopWalden retirement adds to GOP election woes Overnight Energy: Automakers group sides with Trump in emissions lawsuit | Latest on California wildfires | Walden won't seek reelection | Park Service scraps plan to charge protesters for security Oregon GOP Rep. Greg Walden won't seek reelection MORE (Utah)

Bishop confirmed on July 29, 2019, that he will not seek reelection. He had previously said he would remain in office only if he could serve in a leadership position on a committee. Bishop was chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee, but lost his chairmanship when Democrats won the House majority in the 2018 midterm elections.

Susan BrooksSusan Wiant BrooksThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - Democrats to release articles of impeachment today Oregon GOP Rep. Greg Walden won't seek reelection Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 MORE (Ind.)

Brooks said she will not seek reelection during an interview with the Indianapolis Star on June 14, 2019.

In the interview, Brooks said, “This really is not about the party. It’s not about the politics. It’s just about, 'How do I want to spend the next chapter of my life?'"

Chris Collins (N.Y.)

Collins submitted his letter of resignation to Speaker Pelosi on Sept. 30, 2019, before pleading guilty to insider trading. Collins was previously arrested and indicted in August 2018 on insider trading charges.

Mike ConawayKenneth (Mike) Michael ConawayLive coverage: Democrats, Republicans seek to win PR battle in final House impeachment hearing Laughter erupts at hearing after Democrat fires back: Trump 'has 5 Pinocchios on a daily basis' Live coverage: Schiff closes with speech highlighting claims of Trump's corruption MORE (Texas) 

Conaway announced in a press conference on July 31, 2019, that he will retire at the end of his term.

“This chapter in our lives has been more fulfilling than I could have ever imagined. Well, all things come to an end, and my eighth term in Congress will be my endpoint,” Conaway said.

Paul CookPaul Joseph CookWarren bill would revoke Medals of Honor for Wounded Knee massacre Amazon poised to escalate Pentagon 'war cloud' fight The Hill's Morning Report - Trump eyes narrowly focused response to Iran attacks MORE (Calif.)

Cook announced on Sept. 17, 2019, that he will retire from Congress at the end of the 116th Congress to run for a seat on the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors.

Sean DuffySean DuffyJuan Williams: Trump has nothing left but smears On The Money: Trump seeks to shift spotlight from impeachment to economy | Appropriators agree to Dec. 20 funding deadline | New study says tariffs threaten 1.5M jobs Ex-Rep. Duffy to join lobbying firm BGR MORE (Wis.)

Duffy left Congress in September 2019.

"After eight and a half years, the time has come for me to focus more on the reason we fight these battles — family," Duffy said in a Facebook post. Duffy — who was first elected to represent Wisconsin’s 7th Congressional District during the Tea Party wave in 2010 — said he will leave his seat after finding out his ninth child has a heart condition.

Bill FloresWilliam (Bill) Hose FloresDemocrats push to end confidentiality for oil companies that don't add ethanol The Hill's Campaign Report: Warren, Sanders overtake Biden in third-quarter fundraising The Hill's Morning Report — Trump broadens call for Biden probes MORE (Texas)

Flores said on Sept. 4, 2019, that he will not seek reelection. He said he made the decision in order to honor a term-limit pledge he made when he first ran for office.

“After much prayer over the past few days and following conversations with my wife, Gina, during that time, I have decided that my current term will be my last,” Flores said in a statement.

Greg GianforteGregory Richard GianforteProviding more information on the prescription drug supply chain will help lower costs for all Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 House Democrats targeting six more Trump districts for 2020 MORE (Mont.)

Gianforte declared his gubernatorial candidacy at Montana’s state party convention on June 14, 2019.

Tom GravesJohn (Tom) Thomas GravesThe Hill's Morning Report — Pelosi makes it official: Trump will be impeached Republican Tom Graves announces retirement from House Lawmakers skeptical of progress on spending deal as wall battle looms MORE (Ga.)

ADVERTISEMENT

"As we all do, I'm entering a new season in life. An exciting season. So, the time has come for me to pass the baton. Now it's my turn to cheer, support and sacrifice for those who have done the same for me over the last two decades,” he said in a statement on Dec. 5, 2019.

George HoldingGeorge Edward Bell HoldingNorth Carolina congressman says he won't seek reelection after redistricting Democrats likely to gain seats under new North Carolina maps Education Dept. orders UNC to adjust policies after anti-Semitism complaint MORE (N.C.)

Holding said in Dec. 6, 2019, statement that he would not seek reelection after redistricting removed several rural counties from his district.

“I should add, candidly, that, yes, the newly redrawn Congressional Districts were part of the reason I have decided not to seek reelection. But, in addition, this is also a good time for me to step back and reflect on all that I have learned,” Holding said in the statement.

Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdGroup of veterans call on lawmakers to support impeachment, 'put country over politics' CNN's Bianna Golodryga: 'Rumblings' from Democrats on censuring Trump instead of impeachment Republicans preview impeachment defense strategy MORE (Texas)

Hurd tweeted on Aug. 1, 2019, that we would not seek reelection.

"I have made the decision to not seek reelection for the 23rd Congressional District of Texas in order to pursue opportunities outside the halls of Congress to solve problems at the nexus between technology and national security," Hurd said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Peter King (N.Y.)

King said in a statement on Nov. 11 that “after 28 years of spending 4 days a week in Washington, D.C., it is time to end the weekly commute and be home in Seaford."

Kenny MarchantKenny Ewell MarchantHouse GOP wants Senate Republicans to do more on impeachment Ethics sends memo to lawmakers on SCIF etiquette Ethics panel investigating Rep. Hastings over relationship with staffer MORE (Texas)

Marchant released a statement on Aug. 5, 2019, announcing he would not seek reelection.

"It is time for me to announce that I will not seek another term as Congressman from the 24th District of Texas," Marchant said. "I am looking forward to finishing out my term and then returning to Texas to start a new chapter."

Roger MarshallRoger W. MarshallMeat industry is trying to stifle plant-based food innovation Improving maternal health with data and care coordination Trump tears into impeachment probe, witnesses in early Twitter spree MORE (Kan.)

Marshall announced at the Kansas State Fair on Sept. 7, 2019, that he was running for the Senate.

Paul MitchellPaul MitchellEd Markey, John Rutherford among victors at charity pumpkin-carving contest Trump says his Doral resort will no longer host G-7 after backlash House Republicans voice concerns about White House's impeachment messaging MORE (Mich.)

Mitchell made a speech on the House floor, July 24, 2019, informing his colleagues he would not seek reelection.

“A career in Washington has never been my objective,” Mitchell said. “My objective has always been simply to work to address significant challenges this nation faces: health care, immigration and infrastructure for example.”

Pete OlsonPeter (Pete) Graham OlsonGeorge H.W. Bush grandson to enter Texas congressional race What's causing the congressional 'Texodus'? Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 MORE (Texas)

In a press release on July 25, 2019, Olson declared that he was retiring at the end of this term.

“Protecting our future and preserving our exceptional nation are the reasons I first ran for Congress,” Olson said. “Now, it’s time for another citizen-legislator to take up this mission, not to make a career out of politics, but to help lead in the cause of empowering our people, defending our liberties, and making sure America remains the greatest nation in history.”

Martha RobyMartha Dubina RobyOvernight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 Pelosi: GOP retirements indicate they'll be in the minority, with Democrat in the White House MORE (Ala.)

Roby released a statement on July 26, 2019, announcing she will not seek reelection.

“While my name will not be on the ballot in 2020, I remain committed to continuing the fight for Alabama and the people I represent until I cast my last vote on the floor of the United States House of Representatives,” Roby said.

Francis RooneyLaurence (Francis) Francis RooneyDemocrats gear up for high-stakes Judiciary hearing Amash says he will vote in favor of articles of impeachment Billboards calling on House Republicans to 'do their job' follow members home for Thanksgiving MORE (Fla.)

Rooney, who had refused to rule out impeaching President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Democrats worried by Jeremy Corbyn's UK rise amid anti-Semitism Warren, Buttigieg duke it out in sprint to 2020 MORE, announced Oct. 19, 2019, that he would not seek reelection. The Florida Republican told Fox News that he came to Congress to secure money for Everglades projects and for an offshore drilling ban to protect Florida.

"I thought it might take three terms, but I think I've done it in less than two, we've gotten over 10 times as much money per year for the Everglades," he said.

Jim SensenbrennerFrank (Jim) James SensenbrennerControversy on phone records intensifies amid impeachment Judiciary hearing gets heated as Democratic counsel interrogates GOP staffer Doug Collins wants hearing with GOP witnesses before articles of impeachment MORE (Wis.)

In an interview with Wisconsin radio host Mark Belling, Sept. 4, 2019, Sensenbrenner said that he would not seek reelection.

“When I began my public service in 1968, I said I would know when it was time to step back. After careful consideration, I have determined at the completion of this term, my 21st term in Congress, it will be that time," Sensenbrenner said in a statement.

John ShimkusJohn Mondy ShimkusHouse to vote on resolution opposing Russia's inclusion in G-7 Shimkus announces he will stick with plan to retire after reconsidering Shimkus says he's reconsidering retirement MORE (Ill.)

Shimkus released a statement on Aug. 30, 2019, announcing he would not seek reelection.

“As Illinois candidates begin to circulate petitions next week, now is the time for me to announce that I will not be seeking re-election. … Serving in Congress has been a blessing, but it has also been a sacrifice for my wife Karen, and our boys,” Shimkus said in the statement.

Mac ThornberryWilliam (Mac) McClellan ThornberryHouse passes defense bill to establish Space Force, paid family leave for federal workers The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - Democrats to release articles of impeachment today Former White House physician Ronny Jackson to run for Congress MORE (Texas)

Thornberry released a statement on Sept. 30, 2019, announcing he would not seek reelection.

“It has been a great honor to serve the people of the 13th District of Texas as their congressman for the last 25 years. They have given me opportunities to serve the nation in ways I could have never imagined, including as Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee," he said. "We are reminded, however, that 'for everything there is a season,' and I believe that the time has come for a change. Therefore, this is my last term in the U.S. House of Representatives."

Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul Walden'Medicare for All' backers notch win with high-profile hearing Democrats declare victory for eliminating drug protections in trade deal Impeachment surprise: Bills Congress could actually pass in 2020 MORE (Ore.)

“I will not seek re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives, nor election to any other office, but instead I will close the public service chapter of my life,” Walden said in an Oct. 28, 2019, statement.

Rob WoodallWilliam (Rob) Robert WoodallHere are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 House Democrats target 2020 GOP incumbents in new ad The House Republicans and Democrats not seeking reelection in 2020 MORE (Ga.)

Woodall said he will not seek reelection in an interview with The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Feb. 7, 2019.

Doing what you love requires things of you, and having had that family transition made me start to think about those things that I have invested less in because I've been investing more here,” Woodall said in the interview.

Ted Yoho (Fla.)

“I believed when I ran on term limits. I ran on a pledge to serve four terms — eight years and come home," Rep. Ted Yoho (R-Fla.) said on Dec. 10. "Many told me I was naive and they're probably right. I was told the district has changed three times and so the pledge isn't binding and I could rationalize that. However, I truly believe a person's word is their bond and should live up to their word."

 

HOUSE DEMOCRATS

Susan DavisSusan Carol DavisOvernight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by USAA — House Dems subpoena Giuliani associates Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to testify on Libra | Extremists find home on Telegram app | Warren blasts Facebook for not removing anti-Biden ad | California outlaws facial recognition in police body cameras | China rips US tech sanctions MORE (Calif.)

In a letter to her constituents Sept. 4, 2019, Davis wrote that she will not seek reelection 

“My decision today represents a desire to live and work ‘at home’ in San Diego,” she said in the letter. “I will continue to give my all for the next sixteen months and will work as earnestly and as enthusiastically as I have always tried to do.”

Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Gabbard news items generating more social interactions than other 2020 Democrats: study The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - An unusual day: Impeachment plus a trade deal MORE (Hawaii)

Gabbard announced in a series of tweets on Oct. 25, 2019, that she was not seeking reelection to focus on her 2020 Presidential bid.

“I’m fully committed to my offer to serve you, the people of Hawaii and America as your President and Commander-in-Chief. So I will not be seeking reelection to Congress in 2020. I humbly ask for your support for your support for my candidacy for President of the United States,” Gabbard tweeted.

Denny HeckDennis (Denny) Lynn HeckExclusive: Guccifer 2.0 hacked memos expand on Pennsylvania House races Heck enjoys second political wind Incoming lawmaker feeling a bit overwhelmed MORE (Wash.)

"Today, I announce my retirement from a career in public service that began over forty years ago," House Intelligence Committee member Denny Heck (D-Wash.) tweeted on Dec. 4, 2019, with a link to a Medium post explaining his decision to retire.

His retirement follows the conclusion of Intelligence Committee hearings regarding possible impeachable offenses committed by President Trump.

Katie HillKatherine (Katie) Lauren HillPelosi endorses Christy Smith in bid to replace Katie Hill Katie Hill pens op-ed about Congress resignation, toxic marriage, mental health and resilience Young Turks founder: Past remarks on women were attempt 'to be a stupid, politically incorrect Republican' MORE (Calif.)

"It is with a broken heart that today I announce my resignation from Congress," Hill said in an Oct. 27, 2019, statement. "This is the hardest thing I have ever had to do, but I believe it is the best thing for my constituents, my community, and our country."

David Loebsack (Iowa)

Loebsack released a statement on April 12, 2019, that he would not seek reelection. 

“When first elected, I had planned to serve no more than 12 years. However, after Donald Trump assumed the presidency, it became apparent that I needed to run for at least one more term in the hopes that I could provide a check on his worst impulses," Loebsack said in the statement.

Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyOn The Money: Pelosi, Trump tout deal on new NAFTA | McConnell says no trade vote until impeachment trial wraps up | Lawmakers push spending deadline to Thursday Lawmakers push spending deadline to Thursday Little progress as spending talks push past weekend MORE (New York)

Lowey, who became the first chairwoman of the House Appropriations Committee, announced Oct. 10, 2019, she will retire at the end of this Congress.

“After 31 years in the United States Congress, representing the people of Westchester, Rockland, Queens and the Bronx, I have decided not to seek re-election in 2020,” she said in a statement.

Ben Ray Luján (N.M.)

Luján tweeted on April 1, 2019, that he is running for Senate in New Mexico in 2020.

José Serrano (N.Y.)

Serrano announced on March 25, 2019, that he has been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and will not seek reelection. 

"Although this disease has not affected my work in Congress, over the last few months I’ve come to the realization that Parkinson’s will eventually take a toll, and that I cannot predict its rate of advancement," Serrano said.

 

SENATE REPUBLICANS

Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderWays and Means Committee announces rival surprise medical billing fix Impeachment surprise: Bills Congress could actually pass in 2020 Overnight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — Deal on surprise medical bills faces obstacles | House GOP unveils rival drug pricing measure ahead of Pelosi vote | Justices to hear case over billions in ObamaCare payments MORE (Tenn.)

Alexander announced on Dec. 17, 2018, that he would not run for reelection in 2020.

"I will not be a candidate for re-election to the United States Senate in 2020. The people of Tennessee have been very generous, electing me to serve more combined years as Governor and Senator than anyone else from our state," Alexander said.

Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziSenate approves stopgap bill to prevent shutdown Budget process quick fixes: Fixing the wrong problem Eleven GOP senators sign open letter backing Sessions's comeback bid MORE (Wyo.)

Enzi announced his retirement on May 4, 2019.

"I want to be able to focus on budget reform to get control of our national debt," he said in a statement. "I don’t want to be burdened with the distractions of a campaign. After this term I will find other ways to serve."

Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Lankford to be named next Senate Ethics chairman The Hill's 12:30 Report: Job growth soars in November MORE (Ga.)

Isakson announced Aug. 28, 2019, that he will step down from the Senate at the end of the year, citing health issues.

"After much prayer and consultation with my family and my doctors, I have made the very tough decision to leave the U.S. Senate at the end of this year. I have informed Georgia Governor Brian Kemp today that I will resign my Senate seat effective December 31, 2019," Isakson said in a statement. 

Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsLankford to be named next Senate Ethics chairman The Hill's Morning Report - Intel panel readies to hand off impeachment baton The job no GOP senator wants: 'I'd rather have a root canal' MORE (Kan.)

Roberts said on Jan. 4, 2019, that he would not seek reelection.

“I am announcing I will serve the remainder of this term as your senator, fighting for Kansas in these troubled times,” he said. “However, I will not be a candidate in 2020 for a fifth Senate term.”

 

SENATE DEMOCRATS

Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallOvernight Defense: House passes compromise defense bill | Turkey sanctions advance in Senate over Trump objections | Top general says military won't be 'raping, burning and pillaging' after Trump pardons Senate panel advances Turkey sanctions bill despite Trump objections Overnight Defense: Bombshell report reveals officials misled public over progress in Afghanistan | Amazon accuses Trump of 'improper pressure' in Pentagon contract decision | House Judiciary holds final impeachment hearing MORE (N.M.)

Udall announced on March 25, 2019, that he will not seek reelection in 2020.

“I’m confident that we could run a strong campaign next year to earn a third term, because of all the work you and I have done together, along with my wife, Jill, and my incredibly dedicated staff," Udall said in a statement. “But the worst thing anyone in public office can do is believe the office belongs to them, rather than to the people they represent. That’s why I’m announcing today that I won’t be seeking re-election next year.”