Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020

Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020

More than two dozen lawmakers have announced they won't seek reelection in 2020.

In the House, 19 Republicans are heading for the doors, compared with just five Democrats.

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On the Senate side, four GOP senators aren't seeking another term, while only one Democrat has said the same.

Below is a list of who is retiring from Congress, who is vacating their seat to seek office elsewhere and who will leave before their term is up.

This list will be updated whenever a lawmaker announces a retirement or resignation.

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HOUSE REPUBLICANS

Bradley ByrneBradley Roberts ByrneGOP seeks to gain more control of impeachment narrative GOP Senate candidate Tommy Tuberville says Trump has 'put a noose' around farmers' necks with trade war Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 MORE (Ala.)

Byrne announced in February 2019 that he will run for the Senate in 2020. He will attempt to unseat Sen. Doug Jones, the Democratic incumbent.

Rob BishopRobert (Rob) William BishopHere are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 Overnight Energy: House moves to block Trump drilling | House GOP rolls out proposal to counter offshore drilling ban | calls mount for NOAA probe House GOP rolls out energy proposal to counter Democrats offshore drilling ban MORE (Utah)

Bishop confirmed on July 29, 2019, that he will not seek reelection. He had previously said he would remain in office only if he could serve in a leadership position on a committee. Bishop was chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee, but lost his chairmanship when Democrats won the House majority in the 2018 midterm elections.

Susan BrooksSusan Wiant BrooksHere are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 Pelosi: GOP retirements indicate they'll be in the minority, with Democrat in the White House The Hill's 12:30 Report: House panel approves impeachment powers MORE (Ind.)

Brooks said she will not seek reelection during an interview with the Indianapolis Star on June 14, 2019.

In the interview, Brooks said, “This really is not about the party. It’s not about the politics. It’s just about, 'How do I want to spend the next chapter of my life?' "

Mike ConawayKenneth (Mike) Michael ConawayIntelligence watchdog huddles with members as impeachment push grows What's causing the congressional 'Texodus'? Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 MORE (Texas) 

Conaway announced in a press conference on July 31, 2019, that he will retire at the end of his term.

“This chapter in our lives has been more fulfilling than I could have ever imagined. Well, all things come to an end, and my eighth term in Congress will be my endpoint,” Conaway said.

Paul CookPaul Joseph CookThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump eyes narrowly focused response to Iran attacks Pelosi: Democrats will 'certainly' beat Trump in 2020 GOP struggles with retirement wave MORE (Calif.)

Cook announced on Sept. 17, 2019, that he will retire from Congress at the end of the 116th Congress to run for a seat on the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors.

Sean DuffySean DuffyFormer Rep. Sean Duffy and wife Rachel Campos-Duffy welcome 9th child Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 Duffy explains why unborn child's health caused him to resign from Congress MORE (Wis.)

Duffy is slated to leave Congress on Sept. 23, 2019.

"After eight and a half years, the time has come for me to focus more on the reason we fight these battles — family," Duffy said in a Facebook post. Duffy — who was first elected to represent Wisconsin’s 7th Congressional District during the Tea Party wave in 2010 — said he will leave his seat after finding out his ninth child has a heart condition.

Bill FloresWilliam (Bill) Hose FloresThe Hill's Campaign Report: Warren, Sanders overtake Biden in third-quarter fundraising The Hill's Morning Report — Trump broadens call for Biden probes Pete Sessions announces bid for Bill Flores's Texas House seat MORE (Texas)

Flores said on Sept. 4, 2019, that he will not seek reelection. He said he made the decision in order to honor a term-limit pledge he made when he first ran for office.

“After much prayer over the past few days and following conversations with my wife, Gina, during that time, I have decided that my current term will be my last,” Flores said in a statement.

Greg GianforteGregory Richard GianforteHere are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 House Democrats targeting six more Trump districts for 2020 House GOP fears retirement wave will lead to tsunami MORE (Mont.)

Gianforte declared his gubernatorial candidacy at Montana’s state party convention on June 14, 2019.

Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdGOP lawmaker: Trump administration 'playing checkers' in Syria while others are 'playing chess' Sunday shows — Mulvaney seeks to tamp down firestorm over quid pro quo comments, Doral decision Hurd: No Ukrainian officials have told State Department 'they felt like their arms were being twisted' MORE (Texas)

Hurd tweeted on Aug. 1, 2019, that we would not seek reelection.

"I have made the decision to not seek reelection for the 23rd Congressional District of Texas in order to pursue opportunities outside the halls of Congress to solve problems at the nexus between technology and national security," Hurd said.

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Marchant released a statement on Aug. 5, 2019, announcing he would not seek reelection.

"It is time for me to announce that I will not seek another term as Congressman from the 24th District of Texas," Marchant said. "I am looking forward to finishing out my term and then returning to Texas to start a new chapter."

Roger MarshallRoger W. MarshallHouse conservatives attempt to access closed-door impeachment hearing GOP ratchets up 2020 attacks as impeachment storm grows Internal poll shows Kobach trailing Democrat in Kansas Senate race MORE (Kan.)

Marshall announced at the Kansas State Fair on Sept. 7, 2019, that he was running for the Senate.

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Mitchell made a speech on the House floor, July 24, 2019, informing his colleagues he would not seek reelection.

“A career in Washington has never been my objective,” Mitchell said. “My objective has always been simply to work to address significant challenges this nation faces: health care, immigration, and infrastructure for example.”

Pete OlsonPeter (Pete) Graham OlsonWhat's causing the congressional 'Texodus'? Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 Texas Republicans sound alarm about rapidly evolving state MORE (Texas)

In a press release on July 25, 2019, Olson declared that he was retiring at the end of this term.

“Protecting our future and preserving our exceptional nation are the reasons I first ran for Congress,” Olson said. “Now, it’s time for another citizen-legislator to take up this mission, not to make a career out of politics, but to help lead in the cause of empowering our people, defending our liberties, and making sure America remains the greatest nation in history.”

Martha RobyMartha Dubina RobyOvernight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 Pelosi: GOP retirements indicate they'll be in the minority, with Democrat in the White House MORE (Ala.)

Roby released a statement on July 26, 2019, announcing she will not seek reelection.

“While my name will not be on the ballot in 2020, I remain committed to continuing the fight for Alabama and the people I represent until I cast my last vote on the floor of the United States House of Representatives,” Roby said.

Francis Rooney (Fla.).

Rooney, who had refused to rule out impeaching President TrumpDonald John TrumpZuckerberg launches public defense of Facebook as attacks mount Trump leaning toward keeping a couple hundred troops in eastern Syria: report Warren says making Israel aid conditional on settlement building is 'on the table' MORE, announced Oct. 19 that he would not seek reelection. The Florida Republican told Fox News that he came to Congress to secure money for Everglades projects and for an offshore drilling ban to protect Florida.

"I thought it might take three terms, but I think I've done it in less than two, we've gotten over 10 times as much money per year for the Everglades," he said.

Jim SensenbrennerFrank (Jim) James SensenbrennerFTC Democrat raises concerns that government is 'captured' by large tech companies Hillicon Valley: FCC approves T-Mobile-Sprint merger | Dems wrangle over breaking up Big Tech at debate | Critics pounce as Facebook's Libra stumbles | Zuckerberg to be interviewed by Fox News | Twitter details rules for political figures' tweets House investigators receive initial documents from top tech companies MORE (Wis.)

In an interview with Wisconsin radio host Mark Belling, Sept. 4, 2019, Sensenbrenner said that he would not seek reelection.

“When I began my public service in 1968, I said I would know when it was time to step back. After careful consideration, I have determined at the completion of this term, my 21st term in Congress, it will be that time," Sensenbrenner said in a statement.

John ShimkusJohn Mondy ShimkusSyria says it won't resume talks with US-backed Kurdish forces amid Turkish onslaught GOP lawmaker after Syria decision: 'Pull my name off the "I support Donald Trump" list' Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 MORE (Ill.)

Shimkus released a statement on Aug. 30, 2019, announcing he would not seek reelection.

“As Illinois candidates begin to circulate petitions next week, now is the time for me to announce that I will not be seeking re-election. … Serving in Congress has been a blessing, but it has also been a sacrifice for my wife Karen, and our boys,” Shimkus said in the statement.

Mac ThornberryWilliam (Mac) McClellan ThornberryPelosi arrives in Jordan with bipartisan congressional delegation Furious Republicans prepare to rebuke Trump on Syria Five ways Trump's Syria decision spells trouble MORE (Texas)

Thornberry released a statement on Sept. 30 announcing he would not seek reelection.

“It has been a great honor to serve the people of the 13th District of Texas as their congressman for the last 25 years.  They have given me opportunities to serve the nation in ways I could have never imagined, including as Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee," he said. "We are reminded, however, that 'for everything there is a season,' and I believe that the time has come for a change. Therefore, this is my last term in the U.S. House of Representatives."

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Woodall said he will not seek reelection in an interview with The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Feb. 7, 2019.

Doing what you love requires things of you, and having had that family transition made me start to think about those things that I have invested less in because I've been investing more here,” Woodall said in the interview.

 

HOUSE DEMOCRATS

Susan DavisSusan Carol DavisOvernight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by USAA — House Dems subpoena Giuliani associates Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to testify on Libra | Extremists find home on Telegram app | Warren blasts Facebook for not removing anti-Biden ad | California outlaws facial recognition in police body cameras | China rips US tech sanctions MORE (Calif.)

In a letter to her constituents Sept. 4, 2019, Davis wrote that she will not seek reelection 

“My decision today represents a desire to live and work ‘at home’ in San Diego,” she said in the letter. “I will continue to give my all for the next sixteen months and will work as earnestly and as enthusiastically as I have always tried to do.” 

David Loebsack (Iowa)

Loebsack released a statement on April 12, 2019, that he would not seek reelection. 

“When first elected, I had planned to serve no more than 12 years. However, after Donald Trump assumed the presidency, it became apparent that I needed to run for at least one more term in the hopes that I could provide a check on his worst impulses," Loebsack said in the statement.

Nita Lowey (New York)

Lowey, who became the first chairwoman of the House Appropriations Committee, announced Oct. 10 she will retire at the end of this Congress.

“After 31 years in the United States Congress, representing the people of Westchester, Rockland, Queens and the Bronx, I have decided not to seek re-election in 2020,” she said in a statement.

Ben Ray Luján (N.M.)

Luján tweeted on April 1, 2019, that he is running for Senate in New Mexico in 2020.

José Serrano (N.Y.)

Serrano announced on March 25, 2019, that he has been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and will not seek reelection. 

"Although this disease has not affected my work in Congress, over the last few months I’ve come to the realization that Parkinson’s will eventually take a toll, and that I cannot predict its rate of advancement," Serrano said.

 

SENATE REPUBLICANS

Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderGOP braces for impeachment brawl McConnell tightlipped as impeachment furor grows GOP senator: 'Inappropriate' to discuss opponents, but impeachment a 'mistake' MORE (Tenn.)

Alexander announced on Dec. 17, 2018, that he would not run for reelection in 2020.

"I will not be a candidate for re-election to the United States Senate in 2020. The people of Tennessee have been very generous, electing me to serve more combined years as Governor and Senator than anyone else from our state," Alexander said.

Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziPoll: Majority of independent voters want GOP to retain control of Senate in 2020 Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 Liz Cheney and Rand Paul extend war of words MORE (Wyo.)

Enzi announced his retirement on May 4, 2019.

"I want to be able to focus on budget reform to get control of our national debt," he said in a statement. "I don’t want to be burdened with the distractions of a campaign. After this term I will find other ways to serve."

Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonJoe Lieberman's son running for Senate in Georgia Poll: Majority of independent voters want GOP to retain control of Senate in 2020 Embracing President Mike Pence might be GOP's best play MORE (Ga.)

Isakson announced Aug. 28, 2019, that he will step down from the Senate at the end of the year, citing health issues.

"After much prayer and consultation with my family and my doctors, I have made the very tough decision to leave the U.S. Senate at the end of this year. I have informed Georgia Governor Brian Kemp today that I will resign my Senate seat effective December 31, 2019," Isakson said in a statement. 

Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsJeffress dismisses evangelical opposition to Trump's Syria decision: Not one will 'switch their vote' Overnight Defense: Trump defends Turkey amid fierce criticism | Senators demand briefing on Syria decision | Turkey confirms strikes on Syrian border | White House says it won't cooperate on impeachment inquiry Pat Robertson 'absolutely appalled' by Trump's Syria announcement MORE (Kan.)

Roberts said on Jan. 4, 2019, that he would not seek reelection.

“I am announcing I will serve the remainder of this term as your senator, fighting for Kansas in these troubled times,” he said. “However, I will not be a candidate in 2020 for a fifth Senate term.”

 

SENATE DEMOCRATS

Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallSenate fails to override Trump veto over emergency declaration Democratic senators condemn Trump for calling on China to investigate Bidens Green groups line up behind Markey ahead of looming Kennedy fight MORE (N.M.)

Udall announced on March 25, 2019, that he will not seek reelection in 2020.

“I’m confident that we could run a strong campaign next year to earn a third term, because of all the work you and I have done together, along with my wife, Jill, and my incredibly dedicated staff," Udall said in a statement. “But the worst thing anyone in public office can do is believe the office belongs to them, rather than to the people they represent. That’s why I’m announcing today that I won’t be seeking re-election next year.”