Pelosi announces launch of formal impeachment inquiry into Trump

 
Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiHouse Judiciary Committee formally receives impeachment report Overnight Energy: Pelosi vows bold action to counter 'existential' climate threat | Trump jokes new light bulbs don't make him look as good | 'Forever chemicals' measure pulled from defense bill Overnight Health Care — Presented by Johnson & Johnson – House progressives may try to block vote on Pelosi drug bill | McConnell, Grassley at odds over Trump-backed drug pricing bill | Lawmakers close to deal on surprise medical bills MORE (D-Calif.) on Tuesday formally launched an impeachment drive she had rejected all year, a momentous decision that carries huge implications for the 2020 elections.

In an announcement notable for its formal tone, Pelosi, who had rejected moving forward with impeachment for months, framed the move as a necessary response to the long trail of allegations against President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says he will 'temporarily hold off' on declaring Mexican drug cartels as terror organization House Judiciary Committee formally receives impeachment report Artist behind gold toilet offered to Trump sells banana duct-taped to a wall for 0,000 MORE.

“Our republic endures because of the wisdom of our Constitution enshrined in three co-equal branches that act as checks and balances,” Pelosi said from a flag-adorned Speaker’s Balcony behind her office in the Capitol. “The president must be held accountable. No one is above the law.”
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Her decision was sparked by Trump’s own admissions that he had spoken to Ukraine’s president about looking into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHouse Judiciary Committee formally receives impeachment report Democratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations MORE, a leading candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination, just weeks after withholding military aid to that country.

The allegations against Trump shocked Democrats, particularly since their timing occurred after the end of a long investigation by former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump says he'll release financial records before election, knocks Dems' efforts House impeachment hearings: The witch hunt continues Speier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump MORE focused on whether Trump or his campaign had cooperated with Russia in its meddling in the 2016 election.

Trump has denied any wrongdoing and said the aid to Ukraine, which was eventually delivered, was withheld because other countries had not offered help to Kiev. He also said he would release a transcript of his July 25 call, a move that did not satisfy Democrats.

The president’s conversations also launched a complaint from a whistleblower within the administration that the executive branch has refused to turn over to lawmakers. That has angered Democrats and contributed to an escalating number of them calling for an inquiry. Several outlets reported late Tuesday, however, that Trump was prepared to turnover the whistleblower report, as well.

The Speaker’s short announcement capped an extraordinary day on Capitol Hill where Pelosi held back-to-back meetings with the six committee chairmen investigating Trump, and then the full 235-member caucus.

The speed with which the evolving controversy turned into an impeachment inquiry was startling, even for longtime veterans on Capitol Hill.

“You had all of a sudden this kind of galloping series of events, where it became, ‘No I didn’t; what if I did?; so what?,” said Rep. Richard NealRichard Edmund NealOvernight Health Care: House to vote next week on drug prices bill | Conway says Trump trying to find 'balance' on youth vaping | US spent trillion on hospitals in 2018 Democrats could introduce articles of impeachment next week House to vote next week on sweeping bill to lower drug prices MORE (D-Mass.), chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, describing Trump’s attitude toward congressional investigators. “And I think that’s what propelled the next request that the Speaker made to the Caucus to proceed with a formal inquiry.”

The pivot also came after more than two dozen Democrats this week publicly endorsed impeachment articles, or an impeachment inquiry, into Trump’s alleged misconduct.

The long and diverse list included a bloc of vulnerable Democratic freshmen from swing districts, including Reps. Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerPro-Trump group targets Democrats with 'End the Witch Hunt' campaign Club for Growth extends advertising against House Dems over impeachment NRCC campaign prank leads to suspicious package investigation MORE (Va.), Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinIran building hidden arsenal of short-range ballistic missiles in Iraq: report Democrats debate scope of impeachment charges Democrats hit gas on impeachment MORE (Mich.), Andy Kim (N.J.) and Steven HorsfordSteven Alexander HorsfordProgressive freshmen jump into leadership PAC fundraising Mass shootings have hit 158 House districts so far this year Pelosi announces launch of formal impeachment inquiry into Trump MORE (Nev.), as well as close Pelosi allies like Reps. Debbie DingellDeborah (Debbie) Ann DingellHillicon Valley: House passes anti-robocall bill | Senators inch forward on privacy legislation | Trump escalates fight over tech tax | Illinois families sue TikTok | Senators get classified briefing on ransomware Overnight Health Care — Presented by Johnson & Johnson — Virginia moves to suspend Medicaid work rules | Powerful House panel sets 'Medicare for All' hearing | Hospitals sue over Trump price rule | FDA official grilled on vaping policy House passes anti-robocall bill MORE (Mich.), Zoe LofgrenZoe Ellen LofgrenLawmakers to watch during Wednesday's impeachment hearing Pelosi faces tough choices on impeachment managers GOP criticizes Pelosi for sidelining election security for impeachment MORE (Calif.) and Rosa DeLauroRosa Luisa DeLauroPowerful House panel to hold 'Medicare for All' hearing next week Overnight Health Care: Supreme Court sets date for Louisiana abortion case | Border Patrol ignored calls to vaccinate migrants against flu | DC sues Juul Border Patrol ignored recommendation to vaccinate migrants against the flu MORE (Conn.).

Pelosi had previously rejected an inquiry out of concern it could harm such Democrats, making her reversal all the more dramatic.

Pelosi’s move is politically risky for Democrats, as polling shows a majority are against impeachment. Pelosi had previously suggested impeachment would be a political gift to the White House, saying it could help Trump win a second term. Rep. Tom EmmerThomas (Tom) Earl EmmerRepublicans disavow GOP candidate who said 'we should hang' Omar George Papadopoulos launches campaign to run for Katie Hill's congressional seat Shimkus says he's been asked to reconsider retirement MORE (Minn.), who heads the House GOP campaign arm, predicted Tuesday that Pelosi’s decision would doom her majority next year.
 
In the closed-door caucus meeting, Pelosi downplayed the importance of the move in a possible message to centrists.
 
“It doesn’t change much from what is already going on, but we can call the umbrella of the committee work an impeachment inquiry,” Pelosi told lawmakers in the caucus meeting, tamping down the significance of the day’s events, according to a source in the meeting.

Despite the magnitude of the event, Pelosi’s move on Tuesday does not definitively mean the House will vote on articles of impeachment, and lawmakers leaving the late afternoon caucus meeting expressed some confusion over what would come next.

The decision to launch an impeachment inquiry does not require a vote, and the same six committees that had been investigating Trump will continue to do so.

Some lawmakers even suggested the shift was largely rhetorical. “A lot of us said effectively we’re doing it; but now we’re officially doing it,” said Rep. John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthOvernight Defense: Erdoğan gets earful from GOP senators | Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract decision in court | Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families Kentucky Democrat: McConnell's agenda driven by 'power without a purpose' MORE (D-Ky.).

Pelosi is not moving forward with the creation of a special select committee on impeachment, multiple Democratic sources said, and she set no deadline for the Judiciary Committee to complete its work even as she urged the panel to move “expeditiously.”

One Democratic lawmaker said there was “a lot of frustration in the room,” not just among progressives, but among some moderate members, as well. Democrats have received little clarity or guidance about next steps, the lawmaker said, even as Democrats have been criticized for muddling their impeachment message.

Rep. Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerREAD: White House letter refusing to participate in impeachment hearings White House tells Democrats it won't cooperate in impeachment hearings Democrat says he expects to oppose articles of impeachment against Trump MORE (D-N.Y.) was equally as vague as Pelosi in terms of what will happen next.

“Full speed ahead,” he told reporters without offering any timeline.

Still, Pelosi’s shift heartened many liberal impeachment supporters, who welcomed the change in messaging dynamics.

“It’s one thing to put in a footnote in a court document about a grand jury file that you’re exercising your prosecutorial role,” said Rep. Brad ShermanBradley (Brad) James ShermanMnuchin expresses concerns about proposed taxes on financial trades On The Money: House passes monthlong stopgap | Broader spending talks stall | Judge orders Democrats to give notice if they request Trump's NY tax returns | Progressives ramp up attacks on private equity Progressive Democrats ramp up attacks on private equity MORE (D-Calif.), referring to the Judiciary Committee’s effort in late July to obtain grand jury material from the Mueller investigation.

“But it’s another thing for the Speaker to stand up and say we are pursuing impeachment.”

Republicans hardly saw the change as symbolic, and the GOP’s campaign arm was busy throughout the day Tuesday blasting attack emails targeting each and every moderate Democrat conveying an openness to impeaching the president.

“Shalala joins with the socialists,” read the heading of one such email, targeting Florida Rep. Donna ShalalaDonna Edna ShalalaThree legal scholars say Trump should be impeached; one thinks otherwise Overnight Defense: Trump cancels presser, cuts short NATO trip | Viral video catches leaders appearing to gossip about Trump | Dem witnesses say Trump committed impeachable offenses | Trump reportedly mulling more troops in Middle East Pelosi to Democrats: 'Are you ready?' MORE (D).

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyCNN Pelosi town hall finishes third in cable news ratings race, draws 1.6M Economy adds 266K jobs in November, blowing past expectations The Hill's Morning Report — Pelosi makes it official: Trump will be impeached MORE (R-Calif.) piled on.

“I realize 2016 did not turn out the way Speaker Pelosi wanted it to happen,” he said, “but she cannot change the laws of this Congress.”

In between meetings at the United Nations, Trump fired off a series of tweets calling the impeachment inquiry “A total Witch Hunt!” and “PRESIDENTIAL HARASSMENT!”

Thursday could be another pivotal day.

Acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire will be in the hot seat, testifying before the House Intelligence Committee in a public hearing. Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffTrump denies report that he still uses personal cell phone for calls Schiff asks Pence to declassify more material from official's testimony Schiff: Impeachment testimony shows Trump 'doesn't give a shit' about what's good for the country MORE (D-Calif.) and other Democrats are demanding that Maguire hand over the whistleblower complaint, but he’s refused under direction from the White House and Justice Department.

Some Democrats said the practical implications of Pelosi’s announcement will be fully dependent on what she does next.

“The truth is only time will tell how serious the Speaker is about it,” said one Democratic lawmaker.

Juliegrace Brufke and Zack Burdyk contributed.