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House GOP lawmaker: Trump conversation with Ukraine leader 'not OK'

Rep. Michael Turner (R-Ohio), a member of the House Intelligence Committee, said on Thursday that President TrumpDonald John TrumpNearly 300 former national security officials sign Biden endorsement letter DC correspondent on the death of Michael Reinoehl: 'The folks I know in law enforcement are extremely angry about it' Late night hosts targeted Trump over Biden 97 percent of the time in September: study MORE's conversation with Ukraine's leader, during which Trump urged him to open an investigation into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenNearly 300 former national security officials sign Biden endorsement letter Trump narrows Biden's lead in Pennsylvania: poll Florida breaks first-day early voting record with 350K ballots cast MORE, was "not OK."

Turner openly criticized Trump as he began his questioning of acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire at a House Intelligence Committee hearing concerning a whistleblower complaint about Trump's July 25 call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.
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"I've read the complaint and I've read the transcript of the conversation with the president and the president of the Ukraine. Concerning that conversation, I want to say to the president: This is not OK. That conversation is not OK. And I think it's disappointing to the American public when they read the transcript," Turner said.

Shortly before the start of Thursday's hearing, the Intelligence Committee released a declassified version of the whistleblower complaint detailing Trump's interactions with Ukraine's president.
 
The complainant said "multiple White House officials with direct knowledge" described details of the phone call with Zelensky, including that "the president used the remainder of the call to advance his personal interests. Namely, he sought to pressure the Ukrainian leader to take actions to help the president’s 2020 reelection bid."

The complaint also said that White House officials were "deeply disturbed by what had transpired in the phone call."

Trump has acknowledged that he raised investigating whether Biden was involved in pressuring a Ukrainian prosecutor to drop an investigation of an energy company of which Biden's son Hunter was a board member. Biden has denied completely the allegations pushed by Trump and Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiRatcliffe, Schiff battle over Biden emails, politicized intelligence Hunter Biden's laptop: A Russian trick, a hack-job — or just what it looks like? Juan Williams: Trump's search for dirt falls flat MORE, the president's personal lawyer.

Trump has denied that he withheld military aid to Ukraine as leverage in pressing for an investigation of the Bidens.

A partial transcript of the phone call released by the White House on Wednesday shows that Trump brought up Biden and said that he would have Giuliani and Attorney General William BarrBill BarrDC correspondent on the death of Michael Reinoehl: 'The folks I know in law enforcement are extremely angry about it' DOJ says Trump can't be sued for denying rape accusation Juan Williams: Trump's search for dirt falls flat MORE call the Ukrainian leader and "get to the bottom of it."

"There's a lot of talk about Biden's son, that Biden stopped the prosecution and a lot of people want to find out about that so whatever you can do with the Attorney General would be great. Biden went around bragging that he stopped the prosecution so if you can look into it ... It sounds horrible to me," Trump said, according to the memo.
 
GOP lawmakers have largely stood by Trump and dismissed Democrats' calls for impeachment in the wake of the whistleblower complaint.

But a handful have expressed concern with the allegations, including Rep. Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdChanging suburbs threaten GOP hold on Texas Bottom line Trump throws curveball on Afghan troop levels MORE (R-Texas), another member of the Intelligence Committee.

"There is a lot in the whistleblower complaint that is concerning. We need to fully investigate all of the allegations addressed in the letter, and the first step is to talk to the whistleblower," Hurd, a former CIA officer who is not seeking reelection, tweeted at the start of Thursday's hearing.
 
Sen. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseCornyn: Relationships with Trump like 'women who get married and think they're going to change their spouse' RNC chairwoman: Republicans should realize distancing themselves from Trump 'is hurting themselves in the long run' The Memo: Trump's second-term chances fade MORE (R-Neb.), a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said Wednesday that “Republicans ought not to be rushing to circle the wagons to say there’s no there there when there’s obviously lots that’s very troubling there."