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Pelosi: Attorney general 'has gone rogue' to protect Trump

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi: Trump should accept election results 'like a man' The spectre of pension failures haunts this election Microsoft: Iranian hacking group targeting attendees of major international security conferences MORE (D-Calif.) on Friday accused Attorney General William BarrBill BarrPolice accountability board concludes that Seattle police officers used excessive force during encounters with protesters Trump hasn't asked Barr to open investigation into Bidens, McEnany says Seattle, Portland, NYC sue Trump administration over threat to pull federal money MORE of going "rogue" in his efforts to protect President TrumpDonald John TrumpHillary Clinton responds to Chrissy Teigen tweet: 'I love you back' Police called after Florida moms refuse to wear face masks at school board meeting about mask policy Supreme Court rejects Trump effort to shorten North Carolina mail-ballot deadline MORE from the fallout over a whistleblower complaint related to Trump's conversations with the president of Ukraine.

During an appearance on MSNBC's "Morning Joe," Pelosi argued that Barr was part of a White House "cover-up" of Trump's call to Ukraine's Volodymyr Zelensky, during which Trump asked Zelensky about the possibility of launching an investigation into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHillary Clinton responds to Chrissy Teigen tweet: 'I love you back' Supreme Court rejects Trump effort to shorten North Carolina mail-ballot deadline Overnight Defense: Trump campaign's use of military helicopter raises ethics concerns | Air Force jets intercept aircraft over Trump rally | Senators introduce bill to expand visa screenings MORE.

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"He's gone rogue," Pelosi said. "I think where they're going is a cover-up of a cover-up."

"I think it's sad, to have a Justice Department go so rogue," she continued. "Well, they have been for a while. And now it just makes matters worse."

The Speaker's comments on MSNBC were her first in a sit-down interview since announcing Tuesday that the House would launch an impeachment inquiry into Trump over his conversations with Zelensky, which Democrats argue show clear evidence that Trump attempted to pressure Ukraine's president into launching an investigation into Biden after speaking about possible military aid to the country.

Republicans and allies of the White House have argued that a readout of the call shows no improper influence exerted by Trump over the issue, and the White House has blasted Democrats for moving to impeachment proceedings over the issue.

More than 220 Democrats in the House say they back an impeachment inquiry, more than the 218 needed to impeach the president.