Pelosi tells Democrats to focus on Constitution, not Trump

Pelosi tells Democrats to focus on Constitution, not Trump
© Greg Nash

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump puts Supreme Court fight at center of Ohio rally CDC causes new storm by pulling coronavirus guidance Overnight Health Care: CDC pulls revised guidance on coronavirus | Government watchdog finds supply shortages are harming US response | As virus pummels US, Europe sees its own spike MORE (D-Calif.) is reportedly urging members of her caucus to focus on their constitutional duties, and not President Trump, as the House moves forward with an impeachment inquiry. 

Pelosi and top House Democrats doubled down on that focus during a private conference call with members Sunday afternoon, emphasizing the need to put congressional responsibility ahead of politics. 

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“I’m in Texas and they have a saying here: ‘Don’t Mess with Texas.’ Well, I say, ‘Don’t Mess with the Constitution, Mr. President,’ ” Pelosi said, according to an aide on the call. 

The aide said the Speaker told members the inquiry “isn’t about politics” or partisanship — “It’s about patriotism,” she said. 

“The idea that this has anything to do with whether you like him or not — forget that. That’s about the election. This is about the Constitution,” Pelosi said, according to an aide. 

The call was first reported by Politico

The news outlet reports that Rep. Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosThe Hill's Campaign Report: Biden asks if public can trust vaccine from Trump ahead of Election Day | Oklahoma health officials raised red flags before Trump rally DCCC dropping million on voter education program Clark rolls out endorsements in assistant Speaker race MORE (D-Ill.), head of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC), told vulnerable members to test their message in polling across their districts. 

The aide on the call said the Speaker also reiterated that the “polls have changed drastically about this.”

House Democratic Caucus Chairman Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesPelosi: House will stay in session until agreement is reached on coronavirus relief Races heat up for House leadership posts Postmaster general earned millions from company with ties to Postal Service: report MORE (N.Y.) also reportedly outlined a plan for members to use “repetition” with six words: “betrayal, abuse of power, national security."

“If we stick to the Speaker’s plan, we will prevail,” House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerSchumer: 'Nothing is off the table' if GOP moves forward with Ginsburg replacement Top Democrats call for DOJ watchdog to probe Barr over possible 2020 election influence House passes bill to protect pregnant workers MORE (D-N.Y.) added, according to Politico. 

A spokesperson for Pelosi’s office was not immediately available for comment regarding the reported conference call. 

Bustos also reportedly cited the DCCC’s first poll on impeachment since Pelosi launched a formal inquiry last week. Politico reports the poll found 54 percent of likely voters support the inquiry. 

Other polls showed an increase in public support for impeachment since the formal inquiry was launched amid new allegations that Trump encouraged Ukraine's president to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenJoe Biden looks to expand election battleground into Trump country Trump puts Supreme Court fight at center of Ohio rally Special counsel investigating DeVos for potential Hatch Act violation: report MORE and his son. Trump has continued to defend his call with the Ukrainian leader, saying it was appropriate.

A CBS News survey conducted by YouGov released Sunday showed that 55 percent of Americans support an impeachment inquiry. 

A Hill-HarrisX survey on Friday found support for impeachment proceedings rose to 47 percent, a 12-point increase compared to a poll conducted three months ago. 

Almost all House Democrats have backed the impeachment inquiry.

Speaking at the Texas Tribune Festival on Saturday, Pelosi similarly brushed off concerns over political ramifications. 

"It doesn’t matter," Pelosi said, referring to the possibility of losing control of the House in 2020. “Our first responsibility is to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States."

Updated at 8:27 a.m.