Schiff: Trump administration stonewalling will be taken as evidence of obstruction

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffFlynn urged Russian diplomat to have 'reciprocal' response to Obama sanctions, new transcripts show The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - George Floyd's death sparks protests, National Guard activation Hillicon Valley: Trump signs order targeting social media legal protections | House requests conference with Senate after FISA vote canceled | Minneapolis systems temporarily brought down by hackers MORE (D-Calif.) said Wednesday that efforts by the Trump administration to stymie the House's impeachment inquiry will be taken as evidence of obstruction of justice.

“We are concerned that the White House will attempt to stonewall our investigation," Schiff said during a joint press conference with Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump tweets as tensions escalate across US Judd Gregg: Biden — a path to the presidency, or not Trump asserts his power over Republicans MORE (D-Calif.).

“Any action like that, that forces us to litigate, or have to consider litigation, will be considered further evidence of obstruction of justice.” 

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House Democrats formally launched an impeachment inquiry last week after details emerged of a phone call in which Trump pressed Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenStopping Israel's annexation is a US national security interest Trump slams Biden staff for donating bail money to protesters At least 4,400 people arrested in connection with protests: report MORE, a leading 2020 presidential candidate, and Biden's son, Hunter Biden.

Attention was brought to the July 25 conversation by a whistleblower complaint from within the intelligence community that was released to the public last week.

Democratic committee chairs have requested a series of documents and depositions from current and former members of the Trump administration related to dealings with Ukraine since the formal launch of the impeachment inquiry.

Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoHouse, Senate panels to question ousted State Dept. inspector general on Wednesday: report National security adviser says foreign powers trying to exploit US race relations Britain and Europe need to step up their support for Hong Kong MORE warned Tuesday, however, that officials at his agency would not show up for scheduled depositions with House investigators.

Schiff on Wednesday said that those kind of efforts to block the investigations would be interpreted as confirming the allegations in the complaint.

“We will also draw the inference, though, as appropriate, that they are trying to conceal facts that would corroborate the allegations in the whistleblower complaint," he said.

But Schiff also left open the possibility of avoiding court battles with the White House.

“We’ll have to decide whether to litigate, or how to litigate," he said. "We’re not fooling around here though, we don’t want this to drag on months and months and months, which appears to be the administration’s strategy.”

House Democrats earlier Wednesday threatened to subpoena the White House for documents if they do not get requested information.

Shortly after Schiff's comments, Trump called the California Democrat a "lowlife" in a tweet, adding that he would be lucky to have Pompeo's "brains, honor and strength."

Trump previously said Schiff should resign for paraphrasing a transcript of the president's call with Ukraine's leader.

--Updated at 12:05 p.m.