Schiff: Trump administration stonewalling will be taken as evidence of obstruction

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffThe Hill's Morning Report - House prosecutes Trump as 'lawless,' 'corrupt' What to watch for on Day 3 of Senate impeachment trial Democrats' impeachment case lands with a thud with GOP — but real audience is voters MORE (D-Calif.) said Wednesday that efforts by the Trump administration to stymie the House's impeachment inquiry will be taken as evidence of obstruction of justice.

“We are concerned that the White House will attempt to stonewall our investigation," Schiff said during a joint press conference with Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSekulow indicates White House not interested in motion to dismiss impeachment articles Overnight Health Care: Trump restores funding for Texas program that bars Planned Parenthood | Trump to attend March for Life | PhRMA spent record on 2019 lobbying Key House committee chairman to meet with Mnuchin on infrastructure next week MORE (D-Calif.).

“Any action like that, that forces us to litigate, or have to consider litigation, will be considered further evidence of obstruction of justice.” 

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House Democrats formally launched an impeachment inquiry last week after details emerged of a phone call in which Trump pressed Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Morning Report - House prosecutes Trump as 'lawless,' 'corrupt' What to watch for on Day 3 of Senate impeachment trial Sanders wants one-on-one fight with Biden MORE, a leading 2020 presidential candidate, and Biden's son, Hunter Biden.

Attention was brought to the July 25 conversation by a whistleblower complaint from within the intelligence community that was released to the public last week.

Democratic committee chairs have requested a series of documents and depositions from current and former members of the Trump administration related to dealings with Ukraine since the formal launch of the impeachment inquiry.

Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoThe Hill's Morning Report - House prosecutes Trump as 'lawless,' 'corrupt' Overnight Defense: Trump downplays troops' concussion injuries in Iran attack | Dems offer case against Trump on day two of trial | UN links Saudis to hack of Bezos' phone Pompeo willing to testify in impeachment trial if 'legally required' MORE warned Tuesday, however, that officials at his agency would not show up for scheduled depositions with House investigators.

Schiff on Wednesday said that those kind of efforts to block the investigations would be interpreted as confirming the allegations in the complaint.

“We will also draw the inference, though, as appropriate, that they are trying to conceal facts that would corroborate the allegations in the whistleblower complaint," he said.

But Schiff also left open the possibility of avoiding court battles with the White House.

“We’ll have to decide whether to litigate, or how to litigate," he said. "We’re not fooling around here though, we don’t want this to drag on months and months and months, which appears to be the administration’s strategy.”

House Democrats earlier Wednesday threatened to subpoena the White House for documents if they do not get requested information.

Shortly after Schiff's comments, Trump called the California Democrat a "lowlife" in a tweet, adding that he would be lucky to have Pompeo's "brains, honor and strength."

Trump previously said Schiff should resign for paraphrasing a transcript of the president's call with Ukraine's leader.

--Updated at 12:05 p.m.