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Democrats subpoena Pentagon, budget chiefs in impeachment push

House Democrats on Monday subpoenaed the heads of the Defense Department and Office of Management and Budget for documents related to the Trump administration's decision to withhold financial aid to Ukraine while the president pushed the allied nation for an investigation into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenEx-Biden adviser says Birx told him she hoped election turned out 'a certain way' Cheney rips Arizona election audit: 'It is an effort to subvert democracy' News leaders deal with the post-Trump era MORE and his son, Hunter.

In letters to Defense Secretary Mark EsperMark EsperCotton, Pentagon chief tangle over diversity training in military Navy denies NFL rookie Cameron Kinley's request to delay commission to play for Tampa Bay Overnight Defense: Pentagon keeps Trump-era ban on flying LGBT flags | NATO chief urges 'consequences' for Belarus MORE and Office of Management and Budget (OMB) acting director Russell Vought, the three committee chairmen leading the House's impeachment inquiry asked for the documents to be provided by Oct. 15.

“The enclosed subpoena demands documents that are necessary for the committees to examine this sequence of these events and the reasons behind the White House’s decision to withhold critical military assistance to Ukraine that was appropriated by Congress to counter Russian aggression,” House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffEx-DOJ official Rosenstein says he was not aware of subpoena targeting Democrats: report Nixon's former White House counsel: Trump DOJ was 'Nixon on stilts and steroids' Trump DOJ demanded metadata on 73 phone numbers and 36 email addresses, Apple says MORE (D-Calif.), Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelDemocrats call on Blinken to set new sexual misconduct policies at State Department Lawmakers on hot mic joke 'aisle hog' Engel absent from Biden address: 'He'd wait all day' Bowman to deliver progressive response to Biden's speech to Congress MORE (D-N.Y.) and Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsDemocrats plot next move after GOP sinks Jan. 6 probe Lawmakers press AbbVie CEO on increased US prices of two drugs Overnight Health Care: AstraZeneca may have included outdated data on vaccine trial, officials say | Pelosi says drug pricing measure under discussion for infrastructure package | Biden administration extends special ObamaCare enrollment until August MORE (D-Md.) wrote.

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Congress had appropriated $250 million to the Defense Department for the Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative. But according to reports, President TrumpDonald TrumpEx-DOJ official Rosenstein says he was not aware of subpoena targeting Democrats: report Ex-Biden adviser says Birx told him she hoped election turned out 'a certain way' Cheney rips Arizona election audit: 'It is an effort to subvert democracy' MORE asked Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyHeadhunters having hard time finding jobs for former Trump officials: report Trump holdovers are denying Social Security benefits to the hardest working Americans Mulvaney calls Trump's comments on Capitol riot 'manifestly false' MORE, currently the acting White House chief of staff, to put a hold on the Ukraine aid in July 2019.

Trump held a call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky on July 25 in which he urged an investigation into the Bidens and said he would instruct his personal lawyer, Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiGiuliani endorses Republican Curtis Sliwa for NYC mayor The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Democrats' agenda in limbo as Senate returns CNN obtains audio of 2019 Giuliani call linked to Ukraine meddling allegations MORE, and Attorney General William BarrBill BarrEx-DOJ official Rosenstein says he was not aware of subpoena targeting Democrats: report Garland sparks anger with willingness to side with Trump Trump DOJ demanded metadata on 73 phone numbers and 36 email addresses, Apple says MORE to follow up with the Ukrainian government.

The White House eventually released its hold on the aid around the date of Sept. 11, following multiple inquiries from members of Congress about why the aid was delayed.

The committee chairmen are demanding that Esper hand over documents related to Trump's phone calls with the Ukrainian president and efforts by any current or former Trump administration officials to pressure the Ukrainian government to investigate the Bidens.

They are also seeking documents from both Esper and Vought on the delay of foreign assistance to Ukraine, including communications with people in the White House and other agencies, as well as the decision in September announcing that the aid would go forward. In addition, the committee chairmen are asking for documents related to communications with Congress about the status of the foreign aid, such as briefings and written notifications.

The House committee chairmen have issued three other subpoenas as part of the impeachment inquiry launched two weeks ago.

They have subpoenaed Secretary of State Mike PompeoMike PompeoSunday shows preview: Biden foreign policy in focus as Dem tensions boil up back home Sunday shows preview: Infrastructure expected to dominate as talks continue to drag The triumph and tragedy of 1989: Why Tiananmen still matters MORE, Giuliani and Mulvaney for documents related to Trump's conversations with Zelensky and the efforts to hold up the financial aid for Ukraine.

The committees also sent a letter on Friday to Vice President Pence asking for documents related to his role in Trump's efforts to press for an investigation into the Bidens, but the request was not a subpoena.

The chairmen reiterated a threat to other subpoena recipients in recent days that failing to comply with their demands would be used as evidence of obstruction in potentially writing articles of impeachment.

"Your failure or refusal to comply with the subpoena, including at the direction or behest of the president or the White House, shall constitute evidence of obstruction of the House's impeachment inquiry and may be used as an adverse inference against you and the president," they wrote in the letters to Esper and Vought.

The three House committees are also conducting depositions this week with two State Department officials. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland is scheduled to appear on Tuesday, while former Ukraine Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch is set to speak with lawmakers on Friday.

Updated at 1 p.m.