Ex-Ukraine ambassador arrives to give testimony

Former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch appeared on Capitol Hill Friday morning for closed-door testimony in the House impeachment inquiry.

Yovanovitch is expected to discuss her dismissal as ambassador in May, when she was recalled to Washington, and her knowledge of the efforts by President TrumpDonald John TrumpPelosi arrives in Jordan with bipartisan congressional delegation Trump says his Doral resort will no longer host G-7 after backlash CNN's Anderson Cooper mocks WH press secretary over Fox News interview MORE and his personal lawyer, Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiGiuliani asked State Dept. to grant visa for ex-Ukraine official at center of Biden allegations: report Overnight Energy: Trump taps deputy energy secretary to replace Perry | Praises pick Dan Brouillette as 'total professional' | Perry denies quid pro quo over Ukraine Ex-Watergate prosecutor says evidence in impeachment inquiry 'clearly' points to Trump MORE, to pressure the Ukrainian government to open a corruption investigation into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenCNN's Anderson Cooper mocks WH press secretary over Fox News interview Yang cautions Democrats: Impeachment might not be 'successful' Ocasio-Cortez: Sanders' heart attack was a 'gut check' moment MORE and his son.

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Her appearance bucked expectations. On Tuesday, the White House counsel issued a letter warning Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi arrives in Jordan with bipartisan congressional delegation Trump says his Doral resort will no longer host G-7 after backlash Scrap House defense authorization provision benefitting Russia MORE (D-Calif.) that it has no intention of cooperating in the Democrats' requests for documents and witness testimony as they pursue their impeachment inquiry.

And State Department Secretary Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoErdoğan got the best of Trump, experts warn Graham: I'm seeking to make Trump successful 'but not at all costs' Ex-Watergate prosecutor says evidence in impeachment inquiry 'clearly' points to Trump MORE earlier in the week had blocked the deposition of another top diplomat, U.S. Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland, who had flown to Washington and expressed interest in testifying before the three committees — Intelligence, Oversight and Reform and Foreign Affairs — leading the impeachment investigation.

Sondland has since been subpoenaed, and his lawyer said Friday that Sondland hopes to testify next week.

It's unclear if Yovanovitch was cleared by the State Department to testify Friday, or if her appearance came in defiance of the White House's threat of blanket stonewalling.

Leading up to her arrival in the Capitol, where scores of reporters and banks of cameras were waiting uncertainly, there was plenty of speculation about whether she would appear or not.

As lawmakers from both parties trickled in ahead of the 10 a.m. deposition, they all seemed to be equally in the dark about whether she would testify.

"I haven't heard a thing," said Rep. Mike QuigleyMichael (Mike) Bruce QuigleyIn testimony, Dems see an ambassador scorned, while GOP defends Trump Ex-Ukraine ambassador arrives to give testimony Tax-return whistleblower in spotlight amid impeachment fight MORE (D-Ill.), a member of the Intelligence Committee, as he descended the Capitol staircase to the secure basement hearing room where the closed-door deposition is taking place.

Other lawmakers seen entering the hearing were Democratic Reps. Jim HimesJames (Jim) Andres HimesSunday shows — Officials rush to Trump's defense on Syria, sanctions Intelligence Committee Democrat: 'No requirement' for impeachment inquiry vote Sunday Show Preview: Trump's allies and administration defend decision on Syria MORE (Conn.), Denny HeckDennis (Denny) Lynn HeckExclusive: Guccifer 2.0 hacked memos expand on Pennsylvania House races Heck enjoys second political wind Incoming lawmaker feeling a bit overwhelmed MORE (Wash.) and Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffWhite House staggers after tumultuous 48 hours Trump embarks on Twitter spree amid impeachment inquiry, Syria outrage House Republicans 'demand the release of the rules' on impeachment MORE (Calif.), the chairman of the Intelligence Committee. GOP members included Reps. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsTestimony from GOP diplomat complicates Trump defense Obama: Cummings showed us 'the importance of checks and balances' The Hill's Morning Report - Tempers boil over at the White House MORE (N.C.), Lee ZeldinLee ZeldinTrump embarks on Twitter spree amid impeachment inquiry, Syria outrage Graham huddles with House Republicans on impeachment strategy State Dept. official told to lay low after voicing concerns about Giuliani: Dem lawmaker MORE (N.Y.), Scott PerryScott Gordon PerryEx-Trump aide to tell Congress she objected to Ukrainian ambassador's removal: report Ex-Ukraine ambassador arrives to give testimony GOP, Trump look to smother impeachment inquiry MORE (Pa.) and Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanTrump embarks on Twitter spree amid impeachment inquiry, Syria outrage Testimony from GOP diplomat complicates Trump defense The Hill's Morning Report - Tempers boil over at the White House MORE (Ohio), the ranking member of the Oversight panel.