Top State Department official arrives for testimony in impeachment probe

A top State Department official arrived at the Capitol Tuesday morning to testify on President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrat calls on White House to withdraw ambassador to Belarus nominee TikTok collected data from mobile devices to track Android users: report Peterson wins Minnesota House primary in crucial swing district MORE's dealings with Ukraine, the latest witness in Democrats' fast-moving impeachment inquiry into allegations of presidential wrongdoing.

George Kent, the deputy assistant secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs, oversees administrative policy in a bloc of Eastern European countries, including Ukraine, which has emerged as the focal point of the growing investigation.

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Trump and members of his inner circle have come under increased scrutiny following allegations that the administration recalled the U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, Marie Yovanovitch, over her concerns that leading figures — including Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiFeehery: Weak mayors destroy America's great cities Coronavirus concerns emerge around debates Giuliani says Black Lives Matter is 'domestic terrorist' group MORE, Trump's personal lawyer — were pressing Ukrainian leaders to deliver political favors to the president.

Kent had tried to protect Yovanovitch from the internal smear campaign building against her, according to documents delivered to Congress earlier this month by the State Department's inspector general.

He is being deposed by three separate House committees leading the Democrats' impeachment inquiry: Intelligence, Oversight and Reform and Foreign Affairs.

Heading into the secure room in the Capitol basement where the depositions are taking place, Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffGOP chairmen hit back at accusation they are spreading disinformation with Biden probe Schiff, Khanna call for free masks for all Americans in coronavirus aid package House Intelligence panel opens probe into DHS's involvement in response to protests MORE (D-Calif.) declined to comment on the coming witness.

Kent is the fourth witness in the impeachment investigation. Earlier in the month, lawmakers heard from Kurt VolkerKurt VolkerGOP senators request details on Hunter Biden's travel for probe Yovanovitch retires from State Department: reports Live coverage: Senators enter second day of questions in impeachment trial MORE, the administration's former special envoy to Ukraine; Yovanovitch testified on Friday, defying the administration's effort to block her appearance; and the committees on Monday heard lengthy testimony from Fiona Hill, Trump's former top Russia analyst on the National Security Council. Hill stepped down voluntarily in July before Trump's phone call to Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

Separately, the Intelligence Committee has also interviewed Michael Atkinson, the inspector general of the U.S. intelligence community.

The details surrounding the closed-door depositions have largely been kept under wraps. Democrats have released certain details of the various testimonies — including a string of text messages, delivered by Volker, between top diplomats discussing the Ukraine affair — which they say verify the allegations against the president.

"The arrows continue to point in just one direction, which is that a crime was committed — extortion, bribery, soliciting campaign help," Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael Swalwell'This already exists': Democrats seize on potential Trump executive order on preexisting conditions Swalwell: Barr has taken Michael Cohen's job as Trump's fixer The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Chris Christie says Trump team wasn't aggressive enough early in COVID-19 crisis; Tensions between White House, Fauci boil over MORE (D-Calif.), a member of the Intelligence Committee, said Monday. "It was confessed to by the president. And there's an active cover-up going on right now."

Yet Democrats have refused Republican entreaties to release the full transcripts of the interviews and make the hearings public, drawing sharp criticism from GOP leaders arguing that the transparency would lead to Trump's exoneration.

"The tragedy here — the crime here — is that the American people don't get to see what's going on in these sessions," Rep. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanWorld's most trafficked mammal gives Trump new way to hit China on COVID-19 The 'pitcher of warm spit' — Veepstakes and the fate of Mike Pence Tucker Carlson calls Fauci a 'fraud' after tense hearing MORE (Ohio), senior Republican on the Oversight and Reform Committee, said Monday, ahead of Hill's testimony.